Category Archives: Photographers’ Lecture Series

Cig Harvey, Maker of Mysterious Images, Continues Photographers’ Workshop Series

cig 2
Photo by Sam Adler

For our second installation of the 2017 Photographers’ Lecture Series, we welcome acclaimed photographer Cig Harvey, maker of odd, off-kilter images from which one can’t look away. She will speak in the Dodge Room of Reed Campus Center on Feb. 16 at 6:30 p.m.

Harvey’s photographs and artist books have been widely exhibited and remain in the permanent collections of major museums and collections, including the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas; the Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine; and the International Museum of Photography and Film at the George Eastman House, Rochester, New York. Harvey began working in a darkroom at 13 and has been dedicated to photography ever since. She grew up in the deep valleys of Devon in the UK, and came to the States for her MFA in 1999, after years spent living in Barcelona and Bermuda.

Her first monograph, You Look At Me Like An Emergency (Schilt Publishing, 2012,) is a collection of 10 years of pictures and written vignettes. It sold out in all printings and was named one of PDNʼs Best Books of the Year 2012. Harvey had her first solo museum show at the Stenersen Museum in Oslo, Norway, in conjunction with the release. The book was well reviewed in a number of publications, including The Independent, Aesthetica, the Boston Globe, Blink, PDN, and Pro Photographer.

Harvey’s second monograph, Gardening at Night (Schlit Publishing, 2015,) was published in conjunction with solo shows at Robert Mann Gallery, New York; Robert Klein Gallery, Boston; and Paul Kopeiken Gallery, Los Angeles. The book received critical acclaim with features and reviews in Vogue, The Telegraph, the International Wall Street Journal, the International New York Times, and Aesthetica, among others.

The International Wall Street Journal said of the series, “Though the subjects and setting are familiar to us, we cannot help but feel that Cig Harvey has led us through the looking glass to a world of wonder. In the way that twilight is not quite day and not quite night, the photographs of Gardening at Night are stories not yet fully developed, while still capturing the unexpected yet oddly harmonious moments that surround us daily.”

Harvey’s work has been displayed at Paris Photo, Art Miami, and AIPAD every year since 2006. She has been a nominee for John Gutmann fellowship and the Santa Fe Prize, and a finalist for the BMW Prize at Paris Photo and for the Prix Virginia, an international photography prize for women.

Her devotion to visual storytelling has lead to innovative international campaigns and features with New York Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar Japan, Kate Spade, and Bloomingdale’s. Harvey teaches workshops and regularly speaks on her work and processes at institutions around the world. She is known for her high energy, sense of humor, and creativity. She brings a profound sense of optimism to all that she does.

Ed Hing ’77, Williston photography teacher and organizer of the series, said he asked her to speak here because of her creativity and enthusiasm about image-making. “Her work is sensitive and mysterious,” he said. “I always want to know more about the image after I’ve looked at one.”

Wildlife Photographer Melissa Groo Kicks off Photographers’ Lecture Series

Melissa Groo will be on campus on January 19.
Melissa Groo will be on campus on January 19.

Award-winning wildlife photographer, writer, and conservationist Melissa Groo on January 19 will kick off Williston’s 2017 Photographers’ Lecture Series, which brings notable photographers to the Williston campus for a public lecture and in-depth classroom instruction for Williston students.

Groo began her career as a photographer after working in a number of diverse fields, including banking, education, modeling, and silversmithing. A passionate advocate for wildlife and an accomplished technical photographer, she quickly won prestigious assignments for leading photography magazines. She has completed three for Smithsonian Magazine, covering the great sandhill crane migration in Nebraska (March 2014), the rare spirit bear in Brittish Columbia’s Great Bear Rainforest (September 2015), and the endangered Rothschild’s Giraffe in Uganda (forthcoming cover story, March 2017).

grooegret
Snowy egret, Photo by Melissa Groo

Her photographs have been published in many magazines, including Smithsonian, Audubon, Outdoor Photographer. Groo has received awards and honorable mentions in national and international photography competitions, including Audubon (Grand Prize winner 2015), Nature’s Best, NANPA (North American Nature Photography Association), Festival de L’Oiseau, Birds as Art, the HBW World Bird Photo Contest, and Nature Photographer Magazine. She shows regularly and her prints are in personal and corporate collections. Her winning Audubon photos were exhibited in the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., from 2015-2016.

groospiritbears
Spirit bears, photo by Melissa Groo

All of Groo’s photographs are taken in the wild, without any baiting. She feels strongly about the use of ethical practices in the photography of wildlife, and tries her best to disrupt her subjects as little as possible. She created Audubon’s Guide for Ethical Bird Photography with Kenn Kaufman, and she’s advised National Wildlife Magazine and NANPA, as well as the National Audubon Society, on guidelines for ethical photography. She is also a judge for the National Audubon Society and the BigPicture Natural World photo contests.

She writes for several nature photography magazines and teaches photography, as well as maintaining involvement in organizations that promote conservation and ethical photography.

Groo has recently been named recipient of Audubon Connecticut’s 2017 Katie O’Brien Lifetime Achievement Award, which annually recognizes a person who has demonstrated exceptional leadership and commitment to the conservation of birds, other wildlife, and their habitats. She will also receive North American Nature Photography Association’s 2017 Vision Award. This award is given to a photographer every two years in recognition of early career excellence, vision and inspiration to others in nature photography, conservation and education.

Wood duck, photo by Melissa Groo
Wood duck, photo by Melissa Groo

Groo worked for years at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, on elephant communication in their Bioacoustics Research Program. She was a research assistant for scientist Katy Payne with The Elephant Listening Project, and spent field seasons in the rainforest of central Africa studying forest elephants in the wild.

“Melissa’s respect, love, and admiration for her animal subjects comes through in work that is stunningly beautiful,” said Williston Visual and Performing Arts Teacher Edward Hing ’77, who coordinates the series. “She brings passion and professionalism to her craft, with the goal of making a positive impact on our dwindling wild places.”

The Photographers’ Lecture series features internationally acclaimed photographers who present and discuss their work to the school and community. Advanced photography students will have the opportunity to participate in a class taught by the photographers preceding the public lecture. Past visiting photographers have included Steve McCurry, known for his National Geographic magazine cover of the girl from Afghanistan, and award-winning sports photographer Damian Strohmeyer.

The free public lecture will take place in the Dodge Room in the Reed Campus Center from 6:30 to 8 p.m.

Top Sports Photographer Damian Strohmeyer to Speak at Williston Northampton Photographers Lecture Series

Philadelphia Eagles running back Darren Sproles (43) runs for yardage against the Dallas Cowboys November 27, 2014 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. Philadelphia defeated Dallas 33-10. (AP Photo/Damian Strohmeyer)
Philadelphia Eagles running back Darren Sproles (43) runs for yardage against the Dallas Cowboys November 27, 2014 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. Philadelphia defeated Dallas 33-10. (AP Photo/Damian Strohmeyer)

“Did I get this or not?” photographer Damian Strohmeyer recalls asking himself in the seconds after David Tyree’s famous Helmet Catch, the play in the closing minutes of Super Bowl XLII that some have called the greatest in NFL history. A security guard had briefly blocked his camera, but fortunately for football fans, Mr. Strohmeyer did indeed get the shot. His 2008 photograph would soon become yet another iconic image in a remarkable career that now spans more than two decades.

Working for Sports Illustrated, among other clients, the Boston-area photographer has covered the World Series, the NCAA Men’s and Women’s Final Four, the NBA Finals, the World Cup, the Stanley Cup, the Indianapolis 500, several Olympics and 28 Super Bowls. On March 29, however, you can see him, and hear his stories from the field, in the Dodge Room of the Reed Campus Center, as he continues Williston’s Photographers’ Lecture Series. The free event begins at 6:30 p.m. and is open to the school community and the public.

Photography and Digital Video Instructor Ed Hing, who runs the lecture series, says he had been looking to bring a sports photographer to Williston for a number of years. “Every kid is involved in sports here,” he says, “Its such a big part of campus life.” Prior to his talk, Mr. Strohmeyer will be teaching a hands-on workshop to Williston photography students, Mr. Hing noted, and will perhaps demonstrate techniques by shooting the action on the Williston athletic fields.

Mr. Strohmeyer’s list of accomplishments and accolades is considerable.

He has been honored numerous times by the National Press Photographers Association in their annual Pictures of the Year awards, as well as by The University of Missouri in their annual Pictures of the Year competition. He has been recognized by The Pro Football Hall of Fame, which also exhibits his work. He was the photographer for A March for Honor, a book chronicling small town Indiana High School basketball, written by Sports Illustrated senior writer Alexander Wolff.

His list of corporate clients includes Nike, Sylvania, The Animal Planet, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Best Buy, Ackerman McQueen, Canon, Suffolk University, and Boston University. He had done editorial photography for Bloomberg Business Week, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, and Web MD. But he is perhaps best known for his work with Sports Illustrated, whose editors have featured his work on the cover more than 70 times.

Mr. Strohmeyer is originally from Kansas and graduated from Washburn University in Topeka. He is married to Joanne Rathe, a photographer at The Boston Globe and has three children, Jessye, Zach, and Leah. They live in Lexington, Massachusetts.

Mr. Hing notes that the Photographers’ Lecture Series has brought in a remarkable collection of talented photographers over the years, but their work may not always have been as well-known to students as Mr. Strohmeyer’s. This talk, he notes, “is an opportunity to see a world-recognized sports photographer. I mean, 70 Sports Illustrated covers is insanely impressive.”

Ilana Panich-Linsman ’02 Returns for Photographers’ Lecture Series

 

Emily, 11, poses for a photo with her fellow competitors. Emily is not pleased with the outcome of this pageant-- she had hoped to get a higher title. Emily Dextraze is an eleven-year-old beauty pageant competitor who lives in Westfield, Massachusetts, a small town of 42,000 people in Western New England located about two hours west of Boston, Massachusetts. The beauty pageant industry in the United States is estimated to be worth 5 billion U.S. dollars annually; the estimated number of pageants in the U.S. ranges from 5,000 to 100,000, according to an Internet search. It is conservatively estimated that 2.5 million American girls, from babies to teenagers, participate. The cost to a family for a daughter to participate in a pageant ranges from $1500 to considerably more. Entry fees, elaborate costumes, makeup, hairdressing, artificial tans and weeks of professional coaching contribute to the high cost. Photo by Ilana Panich-Linsman
Emily, 11, poses for a photo with her fellow competitors. Emily is not pleased with the outcome of this pageant– she had hoped to get a higher title. Emily Dextraze is an eleven-year-old beauty pageant competitor who lives in Westfield, Massachusetts, a small town of 42,000 people in Western New England located about two hours west of Boston, Massachusetts.
The beauty pageant industry in the United States is estimated to be worth 5 billion U.S. dollars annually; the estimated number of pageants in the U.S. ranges from 5,000 to 100,000, according to an Internet search. It is conservatively estimated that 2.5 million American girls, from babies to teenagers, participate.
The cost to a family for a daughter to participate in a pageant ranges from $1500 to considerably more. Entry fees, elaborate costumes, makeup, hairdressing, artificial tans and weeks of professional coaching contribute to the high cost. Photo by Ilana Panich-Linsman

Ever since Ilana Panich-Linsman graduated from the Williston Northampton School in 2002, her career as a photographer has been on an amazing upward trajectory.

A former student of photography teacher Ed Hing, Ms. Panich-Linsman earned her bachelor’s degree at Scripps College before completing the Eddie Adams Workshop, earning a master’s degree in photojournalism and documentary photography from University of the Arts, London, and graduating from the International Center of Photography’s photojournalism program, where she received a Director’s Fellowship.

Mr. Hing noted that, even as a high school sophomore, Ms. Panich-Linsman started at a higher level than most students.

“Ilana was a student that always took her photography a step beyond expectations,” he wrote in an email. “The imagery was personal and inventive and she was willing to push herself outside of her comfort zone.”

Mr. Hing recalled a biography assignment that Ms. Panich-Linsman completed with flair by calling the subject, noted photojournalist Mary Ellen Mark, for an interview.

“I knew she had the determination to make things happen,” Mr. Hing wrote. “We’ve talked at many points throughout her career building years and it’s been amazing to be able to watch her succeed.”

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS - M.P., 21, waits with her 2 year old daughter at the San Antonio Greyhound Bus Station for a bus to Houston where she has family. November 10, 2015: Asylum-seeking women, most of them with children, have been bussed to San Antonio's central bus station from Dilley Residential Center or Karnes County Residential Center. Organizations including the Interfaith Welcome Coalition and the Red Cross greet the majority of women at the Greyhound Bus Station and assist the women in traveling on or offer temporary shelter in San Antonio. From here, many will transport to family members throughout the country. Others will go to Raices House, a shelter in San Antonio, where they will be assisted. Most women are forced to wear electronic ankle monitors. Ilana Panich-Linsman for The New York Times
SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS – M.P., 21, waits with her 2 year old daughter at the San Antonio Greyhound Bus Station for a bus to Houston where she has family. November 10, 2015: Asylum-seeking women, most of them with children, have been bussed to San Antonio’s central bus station from Dilley Residential Center or Karnes County Residential Center. Organizations including the Interfaith Welcome Coalition and the Red Cross greet the majority of women at the Greyhound Bus Station and assist the women in traveling on or offer temporary shelter in San Antonio. From here, many will transport to family members throughout the country. Others will go to Raices House, a shelter in San Antonio, where they will be assisted. Most women are forced to wear electronic ankle monitors. Ilana Panich-Linsman for The New York Times

On January 21, Ms. Panich-Linsman will return to Williston to talk about her documentary photography, as well as working for such clients as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, NBC News, The Boston Globe, Al Jazeera America, and CNN.

“It’s a thrill to see her credit line on a regular basis in The New York Times,” Mr. Hing wrote. “I’m not surprised by what she’s accomplished so far. She’s telling thoughtful and interesting stories with her images and she’s still in the early stages of her career.”

Ms. Panich-Linsman was named one of Magnum Photo’s 30 under 30 2014, and received the Multimedia Award at the 2010 Lumix Festival for Young Photojournalism. She was nominated for the World Press Photo Joop Swart Masterclass and participated in the VII Mentorship Program, assisting Stephanie Sinclair and Donna Ferrato.

The lecture will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Dodge Room, Reed Campus Center, and like all the talks in the series, is free and open to the public.

Photographers’ Lecture Series Presents David Wells

Courtesy of David Wells
Courtesy of David Wells

David H. Wells, a freelance documentary photographer who specializes in multimedia productions and photo-essays, will present the next in the Photographers’ Lecture Series on April 21.

Mr. Wells, who is affiliated with the outdoor photography distribution company Aurora Photos, specializes in intercultural communication and visual narratives.

On his blog and podcast site, “The Wells Point,” Mr. Wells explains that creating exceptional photographers requires the photographer to go above and beyond in their preparations.

Continue reading

Abelardo Morell to Present at Photographers’ Lecture Series

Courtesy of Abe Morell
Courtesy of Abe Morell

The Cuban-born artist Abelardo Morell uses some of the oldest known photography methods to illuminate new perspectives about the familiar, the new, and the now.

On Tuesday, April 14, Mr. Morell will present the second in this year’s Photographers’ Lecture Series at 6:30 p.m. in the Dodge Room, Reed Campus Center. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Mr. Morell, whose work has been shown in the Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Art Museum in New York, and The Boston Museum of Fine Art, among others, uses camera obscura and tent cameras to illuminate a unique view of the world.

Continue reading

Eduardo Angel Opens 2015 Photographers’ Lecture Series

Courtesy of Eduardo Angel
Courtesy of Eduardo Angel

Photographer and filmmaker Eduardo Angel will present the first in this year’s Photographers’ Lecture Series on March 27.

The lecture will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Dodge Room, Reed Campus Center, and like all the talks in the series, is free and open to the public.

“Eduardo Angel’s specialty is digital video and it’s going to be a much more technical ‘how to’ lecture,” wrote Fine and Performing Arts Teacher Ed Hing, who organizes the series. “It should be very informative and fast paced.”

Continue reading

Photographers’ Lecture Series Presents Ben Brody

BrodyWeb-3A photojournalist whose foreign coverage has included everything from doomed dam projects to assassinations will present the third and final talk in the 2014 Photographers’ Lecture Series on April 29 at 6:30 p.m. in the Dodge Room, Reed Campus Center. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Ben Brody has covered the American military at war as both a soldier and as a civilian. While enlisted in the U.S. Army as a combat journalist, he photographed for more than two years in Iraq, covering Baghdad’s descent into sectarian chaos and 2007’s troop surge. Since leaving the Army in 2008, he has worked primarily for GlobalPost in Afghanistan, photographing and writing in the restive southern provinces.

For more information on this or other events in the series, contact Ed Hing at ehing@williston.com or Traci Wolfe at twolfe@williston.com or at (413) 529-3311.

Lance Keimig Presents Photographers’ Lecture Series

Lance Keimig Death_Valley-0182Lance Keimig, a photographer best known for his nocturnal images, will present the second lecture in this year’s Photographers’ Lecture Series on April 15 at 6:30 p.m. The lecture is free and open to the public and will be held in the Dodge Room, Reed Campus Center.

Mr. Keimig’s book, Night Photography: Finding Your Way In The Dark, was published by Focal Press in August of 2010, and has been translated into six languages. A second edition will be published in late 2014. In a short documentary of the same name, Mr. Keiming described his work as a unique way of compressing time.

Continue reading

2014 Photographers’ Lecture Series Begins in Black and White

Milo Standing in a Puddle, The Meadows

A photographer who specializes in haunting black and white landscapes from trips abroad will help launch the 2014 season of the annual Photographer’s Lecture Series. Stephen Petegorsky, a Northampton-based photographer, will present his work during a public lecture on Tuesday, April 1, at 6:30 p.m. in the Dodge Room, Reed Campus Center.  The lecture is free and open to the public.

Born in New York City, Mr. Petegorsky has lived in the Northampton area for 40 years. He graduated from Amherst College in 1975 as a Fine Arts major, and later received an M.F.A. in Photography from Rhode Island School of Design.

His creative work has been exhibited internationally, and is in collections throughout this country as well as in Europe.  He has taught at Amherst College, Smith College, Hampshire College, and the University of Connecticut, and works as a freelance photographer specializing in photography of artworks.

Mr. Petegorsky has made black and white landscape images for most of his photographic career, and has also made pieces that involve transferring Polaroid emulsions onto boards covered with gold leaf.  Since 1998, he has worked as a volunteer with a group that has aided people with disabilities in developing countries.  His photographs documenting their efforts in Nicaragua, Honduras, Ethiopia, Peru, Colombia, and Jordan became the basis for his most current body of work.

For information on the Photographers’ Lecture Series, contact Traci Wolfe by or at (413) 529-3311.