Category Archives: 1950s

Irwin Kelman Cohen ’53

Irwin Kelman “Kel” Cohen, M.D., died on June 9, 2019, in Richmond, Virginia, at the age of 84. He passed away peacefully at his home with his wife at his side. Kel held confidently to his belief that life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but rather that one ought to skid in sideways, with the body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and while screaming “Wow – what a ride!” Kel is survived by his wife, Gayle Williams; his children, David (Candace) Cohen of Madison, Wisconsin and Nancy (Mike) Kotz of Kensington, Maryland; and his grandchildren Hunter, Lowell, Anna and Hannah. He is also survived by his wife’s daughter, Alison (Carl) Meadows and their children, Clara and Libby. He was preceded in death by his parents, Morris and Ida Kelman Cohen; and his brother, William Cohen. Kel was born March 30, 1935, in Troy, New York. He grew up in Massachusetts and on the shores of Lake Winnisquam in New Hampshire, where his lifelong love for the Boston Red Sox was sparked. After graduating from Williston Academy in Massachusetts, he went on to his beloved Kenyon College and then graduated from Columbia University. He earned his M.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill School of Medicine. Kel continued his training at Dartmouth, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and the National Institutes of Health, after which he realized he wanted to pursue an academic career because of the influence of his mentors at Kenyon and UNC. Kel came to Richmond in 1972 to the then Medical College of Virginia, now the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System and founded the Plastic Surgery program as well as the first Wound Healing Laboratory for research in the United States. His many years at MCV were a source of great fulfillment and satisfaction. He continued to support the university and its programs in any way he could long after retirement. As an educator, Kel served on the Board of Plastic Surgery and was an editor of its journal. He founded the Wound Healing Society, served as its president and was the founding president of the Wound Healing Foundation. He lectured on wound healing and plastic surgery throughout the world, published over 125 papers and edited a definitive textbook on wound healing. His awards include Physician of the Year by the Richmond Maimonides Society and Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Wound Healing Society, The Society for the Advancement of Wound Care and the World Union of Wound Healing Societies. Prior to his death, he spearheaded the organization of the Wound Healing Coalition to give wound healing its proper place in medical science and its deserved recognition with the NIH, FDA, United States Congress, CMS and the public. Kel loved the residents and students he guided and felt a deep satisfaction in the good work they did in health care, knowing that his influence made a difference. He was loved in return by them and also by his countless patients, whom he always treated with respect, kindness and genuine caring, for his hope was to make a meaningful difference in their lives. Despite the rigorous demands of his career, Kel still found time to embrace life with zest and zeal, often while enjoying a memorable meal accompanied by a fine wine. He loved music, photography and cooking, and traveling the globe. He was a lifelong learner with curiosity about everything. He was a true blue Carolina Tar Heel fan. Kel embraced a wide circle of friends from many different occupations, countries, languages and backgrounds and he enjoyed keeping in frequent touch with all of them. Still, far above his career was his family and although at times work kept him from them, he agonized when it did. The accomplishments of which he was most proud are his children and grandchildren. Kel believed strongly that life was eternal because his children and grandchildren carried his DNA and he would always live through his offspring. To Kel, his children and grandchildren made him immortal and death would never be the victor. He loved the line from the poet E.E. Cummings, “How do you like your blue-eyed boy Mister Death?” A Celebration of Life will take place at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to a charity of one’s choice.

W. Kirkland Taylor ’53


Westervelt Kirkland (“Kirk”) Taylor passed away on May 7, 2019 at Swedish Medical Hospital in Seattle, Washington. He was 85 years old. A Seattle resident since the mid-1970’s, Kirk came to Seattle from New York to pursue his career as a civil rights and criminal defense attorney. Admitted to practice in Washington in 1977, Kirk joined the Seattle Public Defender office and soon became a senior attorney supervising and mentoring up-and-coming public defense attorneys. Thereafter, Kirk went on to practice privately handling criminal and civil rights cases as well as assignments in intellectual property, real estate and business law matters. Kirk’s nearly 50 years in the legal field began with his engineering expertise and tenure as a patent examiner in the United States Patent Office, followed by his years working at IBM in Fishkill, New York. The New York State Attica Correctional Prison riot of 1971 marked a pivotal professional turning point for Kirk who had made the decision to shift focus to civil rights and criminal defense. His activism and defense work for inmates caught up in the Attica uprising reflected his passion to combine a zest for the law and legal training with a desire to fight for the rights of individuals, including those downtrodden, marginalized or however challenged by the justice system. While sparring with adversaries, Kirk’s unassuming demeanor masked his talent for negotiating and unrelenting spirit to win. And, guided by a humanitarian ethos, his approachable style resonated with many clients who have shared accolades and heartfelt thanks for his work. Kirk earned his Juris Doctor from American University’s Washington College of Law. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania’s Moore School of Electrical Engineering, he held a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering. Before college, Kirk graduated from The Williston Northampton School in Massachusetts. An outdoorsman, Kirk swapped leisure time spent on Martha’s Vineyard for a joyful life in the Pacific Northwest, often remarking on its beauty and sharing tales of his sailing, fishing, camping and hiking pursuits. He cherished his regular jogs along Lake Washington, workouts at the YMCA and quite a few other favorite pastimes, such as playing poker and chess with his inner circle of friends and colleagues. While his reading list was broad, Kirk was a devotee of the detective genre. And, his overseas travels to Southeast Asia, Brazil and Europe provided even more enchanting stories to tell. Forever an animal lover, Kirk always had a spirited canine companion at his side. Born in New York City on December 20, 1933, Kirk was raised in the St. Albans area of Queens, New York. His father, Westervelt A. Taylor, was a Queens County district attorney and MIT (class of 1927) and Fordham Law graduate, and mother, Zenaide Anderson Taylor, a teacher. A jazz music enthusiast, he recalled during his youth a home filled with music as Mom played piano and at times close St. Albans friends and neighbors, some of whom revered as jazz legends, would visit and join in. In a ceremony officiated by his uncle, the Reverend Jesse F. Anderson, Sr. of Philadelphia, Kirk married Dorothy H. Anderson in the spring of 1959 and is survived and will be missed greatly by their children Kevin, Karen and Todd Taylor. In 2015, Kirk married again and is survived by his wife of 4 years, Patricia Espey. Grandchildren, along with the rest of his family and friends, will remember him fondly as well.

Maria Burgee Dwight LeVesconte ’52

By day, a barefooted Mimi Dwight sang along to Joni Mitchell as she drove a station wagon full of her five children and a shedding Saint Bernard around the streets of Holyoke, Massachusetts. In the evenings, she met in back rooms to organize for social justice in her community and beyond.

Born and raised in Holyoke, she was the youngest daughter of Henry and Marcelle Burgee. Her adolescence at the Northampton School for Girls earned the comment on her report card that “Mimi is a good student, but she seems inordinately interested in boys.” They were interested back.

At Bryn Mawr College in the early 1950s, she joined her first protest march. Her zeal for social justice led her inadvertently to the field of gerontology, which became her passion and profession.

In Massachusetts she was known as Mimi Dwight. Under that name, she co-founded the Urban Ministries (a multi-faith coalition dedicated to participatory government within the inner city of Holyoke); she served on the Commission on the Status of Women, the State Welfare Commission, and the Housing Finance Agency, among others. In the early 1970s, she braved local and state politics to create the nation’s first municipal Geriatric Authority, spearheading the successful effort to turn an outdated Municipal Home into a groundbreaking geriatric rehabilitation center. The building was later named in her honor.

Propelled by her interest in the challenges she saw in the field of aging, she enrolled at Hampshire College to finish the bachelor’s degree she had postponed in favor of marriage and children. When she learned that Hampshire would not accept any credits from her two years at Bryn Mawr, she resolutely set out to complete her Hampshire degree in one year.

After graduating, she loaded her two youngest into a quirky car and drove cross-country to get a master’s degree in Gerontology from the University of Southern California. In Los Angeles she became Maria Dwight, a single mother raising two boys and beginning a career that would see her rise to become a world-renowned visionary in the field of aging.

She joined Gerontological Planning Associates as vice president in 1975 and in 1982 formed her own company, Gerontological Services Inc. GSI became a national advocate for participatory planning for services and facilities for older adults. Focusing on primary data collected directly from older people, GSI developed operational, design and marketing plans for innovative approaches for its clients, who included LGBTQ, Born Deaf, Chinese-American, Japanese American, Native American, Religious Women, expatriates in Mexico and Costa Rica, faith based long term care and housing providers, hospitals, developers, architects, cities, towns, day centers, CCRCs and moderate-income housing projects.

Among achievements too numerous to list, she served on the Board of Overseers of Brandeis University, on the Boards of Centura Health System (Denver), Stonewall Communities (Boston), Wise and Healthy Aging (Los Angeles), the Williston Northampton School and, most recently, Friends House in Santa Rosa, CA.

For 30 years, Maria taught at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design’s summer session; she presented at Harvard’s Schools of Medicine and Public Health; at MIT, UMass, Boston University School of Medicine; at California University of San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego and Irvine; and her alma mater, the USC School of Gerontology. She testified before the United States House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor and the United States Senate Committee on Housing and Urban Affairs.

She was a frequent speaker at international conferences including AHSA Asian Conference India, Asian Health Conference Singapore, International Association of Homes and Services for the Aging Conferences, as well as “Quo Vadis” in Berlin. Maria was appointed to the White House Conference on Aging, National Advisory Committee in 1981 and also served it as a delegate, advocating for the integration of housing and services. Her work was recognized with countless awards, culminating in the “Continuing Care Hall of Fame Lifetime Achievement Award” in 2017.

She was an intrepid traveler who migrated with the reindeer in the Arctic and marched with the penguins in the Antarctic (as well as lots of warm and exotic places in between).

Maria’s small rented bungalow in Santa Monica was never empty. She fed and mothered a vast extended family of skate rats, actors, hard-core musicians, activists, surfers, students, co-workers, artists and writers, as well as her own brood. She was equally comfortable with Senators, Governors and CEOs as with members of the Flesh Eaters, Dream Syndicate and Sonic Youth. And she was admired and adored by them all.

Maria leaves four children: Bill Dwight (Lida Lewis) of Northampton, Lili Dwight (Byron Coley) of Deerfield, Valle Dwight (Phil O’Donoghue) of Florence, and Ryan Dwight of Huntington Beach, California, as well as eight grandchildren: Eli Dwight, Hudson and Addison Coley, Tim and Aidan O’Donoghue, and Ella, Liam and Dylan Dwight. She is also survived by her sister, Paula Gallup ’49 (John Gallup), of Longmeadow, as well as many nieces and nephews. Her husband, Edward LeVesconte; and her son, Timothy Monk Dwight, pre-deceased her.

The family is planning memorial services for later this summer; one at her home in the redwoods of Northern California, and the second in her childhood haunts of western Massachusetts.

Donations in her honor may be made to Whole Children, 41 Russell St, Hadley, MA 01035; www.wholechildren.org.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that you elect a woman President in 2020.

Read more about Maria in the Spring 2016 issue of the Bulletin.

Rodney C. Farnham ’56

Rodney C. “Rod” Farnham, 82, passed away Friday, April 26, 2019, after a long illness. He leaves his wife of 59 years, Phyllis (Underwood) Farnham; his son, James T. Farnham and his wife Linda of Ipswich; his daughter, Merideth J. Farnham of Orlando, Fla.; and his son, Stuart T. Farnham and his wife Julie of Colorado Springs, Colo. He is survived by seven grandchildren, Benjamin, Nathaniel, Elizabeth, Rachel, Hannah, Cole, and John Farnham; and one great-granddaughter, Halie. He is also survived by his sister-in-law and her husband, Grace and Bob Varney; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his brother, John R. Farnham. Rod was born and raised in Northampton, the son of the late F. Russell and Irene (May) Farnham. He spent his early years between Lake Dunmore, Vermont, and western Massachusetts. He attended Williston Academy and was an alumnus of the University of Massachusetts. He met his future wife, Phyllis, at UMass, marrying in 1959. They lived in Conn., Mass., and N.H., throughout their marriage, residing in Hingham for over thirty years. Rod was a retired Reinsurance Executive and was an avid golfer, gardener and cook. He and Phyllis loved to vacation in Vermont, Cape Cod, and Canada. No funeral services are currently scheduled. A private burial may occur at a later date. Donations in memory of Rod can be made to the Norwell Visiting Nurses Association and Hospice via the NVNA and Hospice Charitable Fund, 120 Longwater Drive, Norwell, MA 02061, 781-610-1409.

Jack D. Hathaway ’55


With sad but peaceful hearts we announce the death of Jack Dalton Hathaway. Jack passed away peacefully at home in Woodstown, New Jersey, early Tuesday morning, May 14, 2019 at age 83. Born January 11, 1936 to Harry and Edith Clark Dalton in Ware, Massachusetts, Jack’s biological father died at an early age and Jack was subsequently adopted by his stepfather Holland Marsh Hathaway, whom he always considered his father. Jack is survived by his wife of 59 years, Gertrude “Trudi” Huber Hathaway and their two sons, John Clark Hathaway (Judy) and Douglas Huber Hathaway (Nan) and their five grandchildren, Evan, Clark, Caroline, Elizabeth and Hillary. He is also survived by his brother Clark P. Hathaway (Linda). Jack grew up in Nahant, Massachusetts and Barrington, Rhode Island. He attended Barrington High School and Williston Academy, a boarding preparatory school in Easthampton, Massachusetts, where he lettered in soccer and basketball. In 1959 he graduated from Gettysburg College with a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and History. He earned a Master’s in Education from Shippensburg University in 1968. His athletic career in soccer and basketball followed him to Gettysburg College and in 2008, Jack was inducted into the Gettysburg College Hall of Athletic Honor. At Gettysburg Jack was a member of Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity. After college, Jack served in the Army and married his college sweetheart. He began his teaching and coaching careers in 1962 at Waynesboro High School in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. In 1968 his family moved to South Jersey where he accepted a position as teacher and head basketball coach at Pennsville Memorial High School. In 1980 Jack established the boys’ varsity soccer program at Pennsville High School and coached for many years. Jack truly loved teaching and coaching and made a difference in the lives of many of his students as evidenced by letters he often received years after they graduated. In 1984 he was named New Jersey Social Studies Teacher of the Year and in 1990 he was an exchange teacher to Russia with a program called “Hands Across the Water”. Community volunteerism was always a significant part of Jack’s life. When he moved to South Jersey, he became involved immediately with the Salem County YMCA, which allowed him to work with the youth in the Woodstown area. After his retirement in 1993 from public education he took on numerous volunteer positions. He was a board member of the American Red Cross for NJ – PA and for 18 years he coordinated the Woodstown Red Cross Blood Drive. He was a Salem County Habitat Board member and was President from 1999 – 2002; past chairperson of the Woodstown Historic Preservation Commission; a founding member of the Woodstown Beautification Committee and worked endlessly to secure funding for lampposts and flags in the Borough of Woodstown. Jack was a valued mentor in the Interfaith Council Tutoring Program for 18 years and was a dedicated volunteer for Meals on Wheels. In 2017 he was recognized for his decades of volunteer leadership by receiving the Woodstown Outstanding Citizen Award. Although he served on several boards and committees within the Woodstown Presbyterian Church, he always felt that his time as a Deacon was the most important. He went on three Mission Trips to Romania to help build a Christian Orphanage and numerous mission trips within the U.S. Jack loved spending time in Cape May with his family and friends. One of his favorite pastimes was gathering twice a month with his Hearts group always with a goal of “shooting the moon”. An extra special pastime of Jack’s was playing team sports with the Salem County Civic Softball League and the Pennsville Basketball Rec League. Jack and Trudi along with friends loved exploring far away destinations, the Scandinavian countries were Jack’s favorites. But his greatest joy was sitting and talking with his children and five grandchildren. A Memorial Service will take place at the Woodstown Presbyterian Church, 46 Auburn Street, Woodstown, NJ on May 31, 2019 at 11:00 am with a light lunch and visitation time following the service. Burial will take place in the church Memorial Garden at the convenience of the family. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Woodstown Beautification Committee c/o Lester Robeson, 160 East Avenue, Woodstown, NJ 08098 or the Woodstown Presbyterian Church, 46 Auburn Street, Woodstown, NJ 08098.

James N. Perkins ’51

Jim Perkins, entrepreneur, writer, sportsman, conservationist and patriot, died April 16, 2019. He was 85.
Born in Littleton, NH, a hardscrabble town near the Canadian border, he was the son of Nick and Lucia Perkins, who emigrated from Greek Macedonia. His parents built a life in Littleton opening a popular restaurant, The White Mountain Café, where Jim learned to wash dishes, bake pies and make friends. The family later opened the Perkins Motel, the first Florida style resort motel in the state.
Jim grew up hiking, hunting, fishing and skiing, fostering a lifelong love of the mountains and respect for the environment. The beneficiary of his parents’ reverence for education, Jim graduated from Williston Academy and Dartmouth College.
While at Dartmouth he was mentored by Corey Ford, a prolific humor and nature writer. While still in college, Jim was published in The Saturday Evening Post and Field and Stream and co-wrote a screenplay for John Wayne’s independent film company, Batjac Productions.
Jim described his rich and varied career as “moving words and pictures in various ways.” His early achievements included executive positions with Curtis Publishing, Doubleday & Co., Playboy Press and The Times Mirror Company, where he initiated successful book projects such as the Outdoor Bible Series and the Audubon Nature Encyclopedia, which sold millions of copies.
Following his corporate publishing career Jim started his own marketing agency. He went on to originate The Home Shopping Show, a half-hour program delivered by satellite on which national advertisers such as Revlon, Pillsbury and Chevrolet demonstrated their products. Advertising Age called Jim a “new media visionary and one of the original cable idea men.” He joined with the Hearst Corporation and ABC Television to head a venture specializing in cable programming and is credited with creating the original Lifetime and ARTS networks. Next, he followed the developing technology, creating communication projects for a joint venture between Citibank, Nynex and RCA called CNR Partners.
Conservation was a continuing thread in Jim’s life. As an Air Force lieutenant he worked in the Office of Public Information. He became a captain and as one of the most junior officers in the Pentagon, Jim developed a program to designate Air Force bases as conservation areas. His concept was accepted and it is credited with protecting some 30 million acres and hundreds of endangered species of plants and animals on military bases around the world. For this big idea Jim received The U.S. Commendation Medal, the nation’s second highest peacetime award. More recently he was honored again by the Department of Defense for “One Good Idea.”
After moving to Litchfield County, Connecticut, Jim became a trustee of the Sunny Valley Association, protecting 2,500 acres. He originated and chaired The New Milford Inland Wetlands Commission and was president of The Housatonic Valley Association. He received an official citation from the Connecticut General Assembly for helping to protect thousands of acres in Kent from projected casino development.
An avid athlete, Jim loved cruising on his trawler The Chimera, and was still skiing in his 80s in Colorado and Montana. He also loved golf, heading up the Northwest Seniors League, and was a 28-year member of The Lake Waramaug Country Club.
Fearless, intelligent, hardworking, stylish, curious, generous and fun, he was known as “a guy who makes things happen.” Beloved husband, father, brother and patriarch, Jim is survived by Judy, his wife of 40 years, and daughters Susan (an MBA, CFA, attorney and skydiver), Karen (a PhD in molecular biology, educator and triathlon competitor) and Elizabeth (a stage, film and television actor). His survivors also include his sister Pamela Perkins; brothers-in-law Bruce Berger and James Holb; sons-in-law Julio Macat and Jon Stark; his aunt Catherine Tegu; eight grandchildren; and many talented cousins, nieces and nephews, all of whom Jim loved and respected as individuals. He was preceded in death by his sister Nitsa Perkins Bailey.
Jim’s autobiography By Way of Luck – How Chance Shaped a Storied Life, chronicles his ever evolving adventures.
Services will be held June 8, 2019 at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Kent, where Jim was a member of The Vestry. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to The Kent Memorial Library, The Kent Volunteer Fire Department or the Kent Land Trust.
Those who cannot attend may wish to send a note with a memory of Jim to judyperkins77@gmail.com.

Karen McKenzie Anderson ’54

Karen McKenzie Anderson of Wernersville, PA, passed away peacefully in her home with her family present on February 25, 2019, at the age of 82 after a brief illness. She was predeceased by her husband of 45 years. Born on September 6, 1936, Karen was the only child of Kenneth W. McKenzie and Elizabeth “Betty” McKenzie. She grew up in Essex, Connecticut and graduated from the University of Vermont in 1958. That same year, she married David C. Anderson after his graduation from the United States Naval Academy. During David’s military service, the family moved frequently and lived overseas. They settled in West Hartford and Farmington, Connecticut, while David practiced law in Hartford for over 30 years.Karen enjoyed being a part of Phoebe Berks Village for 10 years where she met many new friends and served in several volunteer roles. She was an active member of the Friends Wernersville Public Library. Karen loved birdwatching and travel. She is survived by her three daughters and by seven grandchildren: Celia Anderson Davis (Paul E. Davis) of Parkton, Maryland and their children Samuel and Dorothy (Dee Dee); Jane Anderson Price (Stephen H. Price) of Wernersville and their children Morgan, Emma and Gwyn; and Deborah C. Stevens (Michael F. Stevens) of Niles, Michigan and their children Luke and Caleb.A private graveside service at the Mountain View Cemetery in Bloomfield, Connecticut, is planned for a future date. Lamm & Witman Funeral Home, Inc., 243 W. Penn Ave., Wernersville, is handling arrangements. In lieu of flowers, donations in Karen’s memory may be directed to Wernersville Public Library or to a charity of the donor’s choice.

Richard B. Brady ’58

Richard B. Brady, 79, beloved husband of Irene T. Brady, passed away due to complications of lung cancer on March 18, 2019. Dick was the son of John F. and Gertrude (Clifford) Brady, and was born on August 15, 1939 in Hartford, Connecticut. A life-long resident of West Hartford, he was a man of strong faith in God and known for his humor. He loved golfing, fishing and boating and summers at Old Lyme Shores. A humble man and wonderful storyteller, he loved to ignite the imagination of others, including young children with his story of the “green hand.” Dick is survived by: his wife of 54 years, Irene; his sister, Gillian Hollister and her husband, Bob; his Four Bouys (the fond name of his boat): Christopher, Patrick, Peter and Kevin, and their spouses and significant others; and his four grandchildren he adored, Ryan, Caitlyn, Kathryn and Ayn, as well as many nieces and nephews. Dick was predeceased by his brother, Jack, and is survived by Jack’s wife Cathy. Friends may call at Molloy Funeral Home, 906 Farmington Avenue, West Hartford, on Sunday, March 24th from 2 pm until 5 pm. A Mass will be held on Monday, March 25th at 10 am at St. Thomas the Apostle Church, 872 Farmington Ave., West Hartford, CT 06119, followed by burial at Fairview Cemetery, 200 Whitman Avenue, West Hartford. In lieu of flowers, donations In Memory of Richard B. Brady may be made to the Smilow Cancer Hospital at the St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center (www.saintfrancisdonor.com) or the American Cancer Society (cancer.org). Online expressions of sympathy at www.molloyfuneralhome.com.
And, as Dick would say, “See ya around the globe.”

Barbara Allen Roberts ’55

Barbara Theo (Allen) Roberts, age 82, of Framingham, MA, passed away March 7, 2019, with her family by her side after a long illness. Barbara was born to the late Mr. and Mrs. Joseph G. Allen in Springfield, MA on December 6, 1937. Barbara attended Northampton School for Girls and graduated from Classical High School in 1955. She continued her education at Boston University graduating with a degree in 1959. Born and raised in Springfield and Longmeadow, MA, she spent the bulk of her life in Framingham, MA, before moving to Dublin, OH where four of her grandchildren resided for the final years of her life. For 40 of those years she lived in a house she cherished and often described her bedroom as “living amidst nature in a glass treehouse.” Barbara married the late Sumner B. Roberts in 1962 and they are survived by two children: Emily Wick of Norfolk, MA and Andrew Roberts (Mimi Rivard) of Dublin, OH. She was predeceased by her beloved son-in-law K. Bryant Wick Jr. She is survived by five grandchildren: Grady Wick, Sumner “Chappie” Wick, Simone Rivard-Roberts, Andre Roberts and Derara Roberts. Each of them will miss the pocket money stealthily bestowed on them with each interaction with their Grammy. Barbara also leaves behind her loving sister Carol (Harvey) Gloth and their children Larry (Danielle) and Joey Ann. She truly loved keeping in touch with her aunts and uncles and many loving cousins, nieces and nephews. Barbara loved keeping track of her extended family and bestowing thoughtful gifts upon them as they graduated, married, and had children of their own. She also had a strong belief in the power of cards for all occasions and hand written thank you notes; a lost art in her humble opinion. Barbara was an accomplished interior designer and loved creating spaces filled with beautiful and functional things that had great meaning and fit the lifestyles of her grateful clients. Barbara loved to travel and often regaled her friends and family with stories about the places she had been and the people she had seen. Barbara was immensely proud of her children and grandchildren, and was a fiercely loyal mother and grandmother. “In for a penny, in for a pound” was her view of her family and she never gave up on a soul whose corner she was in. Barbara was not the sort of person who wanted one to be confused about where she stood on any particular issue, and she was much appreciated for her sage counsel on all manner of life’s issues. Late in life, Barbara continued to show her independence, autonomy and courage when faced with challenging health news. Barbara chose to forego treatment and focus on the quality of her remaining life and lived three times past her initial prognosis on a strict diet of milkshakes and hamburgers. Her family takes great solace in knowing she lived her life exactly the way she wanted to right up until her passing. Her gratitude, humility and humor in her final year were a wonder to behold. A Celebration of Life event will be held in Barbara’s honor on April 5th, 2019 at 11:30 a.m. at The Wayside Inn in Sudbury, MA. Please reach out to the family if you plan to attend. In lieu of sending flowers, the family requests that people make donations in Barbara’s name to a cause she held dear due to the impact it had on her family: the American Diabetes Association . Please mail gifts to: 40 Speen Street Framingham, MA 01701.

Ann Hyde Ahlquist ’51

Ann H. Ahlquist, 86, passed away unexpectedly on Feb. 18, 2019 at Maine Medical Center in Portland. She was born Sept. 8, 1932, in Portland to Samuel and Elizabeth (Swan) Hyde. Ann graduated from Cape Elizabeth High School, and then Northampton School for Girls in Northampton, Mass., in 1951. From there, she entered Boston Bouve School and Tufts University, majoring in physical education. Ann taught in that field at King Junior High School in Portland for some 30 years until her retirement. Ann grew up in Cape Elizabeth and became an accomplished horse rider by age 15, earning many ribbons with her horse, On Parade. She competed in many horse shows throughout Maine, Pennsylvania, and Madison Square Garden in New York. She boarded her horses in Scarborough at a small farm owned by Leon H. Ahlquist, who shared the same love of horses, and on April 4, 1977, they were married. She had seven massive display cases in her home filled with winning ribbons in 3-gaited and saddle classes. Many more ribbons decorate the home’s woodwork and walls. She rode for The Dressage Riding Club of Cape Elizabeth, and the Pleasant Hill Riding Club. Ann and Leon were very much in love and were always with one another throughout their marriage, sharing the farm work equally in what became a land-locked Noah’s Ark. Noah had two of everything; Ann and Leon had multiples of many, both animal and fowl. Although not all at once, there were at times eight cows, two bulls, a pair of draft horses, 14 mini horses (for show), three mini goats, 17 beagles (for trials), two pair of peacocks, Cochin and bantam hens, seven types of ducks, and pheasants, countless hens, and 17 bee hives. When the livestock grew in numbers, the old barn on the back of the house was torn down, and a brand-new expanded barn was erected further back behind the house to ease the workload. They sold eggs, honey, and beeswax candles. Besides all this, they also had landscape and lawn care customers in the Prout’s Neck area for 18 years. Ann worked part time at two Pratt Abbott Dry Cleaners during this time as well. Both Ann and Leon were big Red Sox, Patriots and Celtics fans, watching many of the games. Ann belonged to the Maine Farm Bureau Association, The Maine Miniature Horse Club, The American Miniature Horse Association, and The Southern Maine Beagle Club. Ann was predeceased by her parents; and one sister, Elizabeth H. Stone. Survivors include, one sister, Jane and husband, Robert Chesebro, of Portland; nephew, Carl Ahlquist and wife, Judy, of Scarborough; nephews, Jeffrey A. Stone of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., Mark A. Stone and wife, Kristen, of Franklin, Tenn.; and niece, Kathleen S. Haarbauer of Cudjoe Key, Fla.; many grandnephews and nieces also survive. Per Ann and Leon’s wishes, no services are being held at this time.