Category Archives: 1950s

Natalie Field ’53

Natalie Field, of Jackson, Michigan, died November 8, 2015. She is survived by her sister Harriet (Tat) Field Miller ’55 of Grand Rapids, MI and her Jackson family of friends: Lynne Loftis, Liz Wierzbicki, Judy Horn, Janeen Cargill and her extended family at Rex Terrace. She was born March 18, 1935 in Jackson to Leonard H. and Janet McGee Field. Natalie graduated from Smith College in 1957 with a degree in mathematics. After college she worked for General Electric with a team of engineers designing nuclear submarines, and then returned to Jackson where she was active in the Jackson Junior Welfare League, the Jackson County Republican Party and the Ella Sharp Museum. She loved reading, cats, train travel and everything connected with Elk Lake.

Thomas S. Cottrell ’51

Thomas Sylvester Cottrell, M.D. of Cutchogue, NY died at age 83 of a stroke at his home on Sept. 17, 2017. Tom Cottrell was born in Chicago to Sylvester V. and Cleo Medley Cottrell, spent his childhood in Detroit and graduated from Williston Academy in Easthampton, MA. After earning a Bachelor of Arts degree from Brown University in 1955 he returned to Williston to teach English. Training at Officer Candidate School in Newport, R.I., led to a commission in the U.S. Navy from 1957 to 1960 aboard the USS Scanner, based in California. Tom married his wife of 58 years, Jane Chichester Cottrell, in San Francisco in 1959. Lieutenant (LTJG) Cottrell received an honorable discharge from the U.S. Navy in 1965. Dr. Cottrell earned his M.D. from Columbia University in the City of New York, College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1965. His fellowship in pathology at Yale University in 1967 researching diseases of the lung was recognized for excellence by the John and Mary Markle Foundation. In 1968, Dr. Cottrell began his career in academic medicine as Senior Associate Dean of New York Medical College in Valhalla, N.Y. He joined the Stony Brook University faculty in 1979 as a founding architect of the School of Medicine, where he was affectionately known as Doctor Tom. At Stony Brook, few could evade the personal focus that Doctor Tom brought to all those he interacted with during his 21-year tenure as Executive Associate Dean and Associate Professor of Pathology, leading up to his retirement in 2000. At that time, he was given Professor Emeritus status in recognition of his valued service to the university. Doctor Tom’s impact extended beyond the Dean’s Office to all those students and colleagues who confidently sought out his insight and advice as a mentor and friend. Survivors include his wife, Jane; his brother, Stephen; three adult children, including Matthew Thomas Cottrell, Anne Cottrell Patin and Sarah Jane Lazar; and grandsons, Nicholas Cottrell Patin and Andre Thomas Patin.

William H. Aydelotte ’55

William H. “Willie” Aydelotte, 82, passed away October 3, 2017 at his home in Reno, NV. Willie was born in Schenectady, NY on August 14, 1935 to William and Margaret Aydelotte. Willie grew up in Schenectady and attended Williston Academy in Easthampton, MA and Bryant College in Providence, RI where he earned a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.

Upon graduation, Willie went to work for the Travelers Insurance Company in Hartford, CT. Although he was trained in all facets of the Life, accident and Health Departments, he eventually was placed in the Employee Benefits Division. After a year of training, The Travelers transferred him to their branch office in San Francisco, CA.

After several years in the insurance industry, Willie was lured away by a client who wanted him to head a recreational facility near Heavenly Valley, CA. Willie sold his insurance agency and moved to South Lake Tahoe where he helped to develop several townhouse and recreational facilities. Eventually the real estate venture failed and Willie was forced to move to Reno where he became a real estate agent until his retirement in 1995.

One evening, a friend invited Willie to square dancing class to learn the dance and meet a lovely friend of theirs who was well versed in the dance and would be his “partner for the evening.” The “partner for the evening” turned into a partner for life and Mary Anna and Willie were married in August 1991.

Willie was very active in Free Masonry. He was Worshipful Master of his Lodge, Potentate of Kerak Shrine and president of many clubs and organizations, both in Reno and Ft. Myers, FL where he retired. He loved to play golf and was a member of the United States Professional Tennis Association. He was also an avid skier also belonged to the National Ski Patrol.

Willie is survived by his wife Mary Anna, his sister Margaret Mills of New York, his brother G. Thomas of Greenwich, CT, nieces Julie Levine and Lee Aydelotte Boffey, nephew Tommy Mills, two stepsons, Chris and John and many, many other relatives by marriage.

Barton D. Kagan ’52

Barton David Kagan of Randolph, MA, on September 10, 2017.  Beloved husband of 62 years to his dear wife Barbara (Block) Kagan of Randolph. Cherished father of Phyllis Kagan Clayman and her husband Larry Clayman of Massachusetts, Rory Kagan and her husband Rafael Garces of Virginia, and Anita Kagan of Massachusetts. Devoted grandfather of Gregory Clayman of California, Julie Clayman of Massachusetts, Raquel Garces of Virginia and Renee Garces of Virginia. Adored brother of Richard G. Kagan ’60 and his wife Celia of Massachusetts and Florida. Treasured brother-in-law of Nelson E. Block and his wife Rhonda of Massachusetts. Revered son of the late Sidney J. and Mildred B. Kagan of Malden. Also survived by many nephews, nieces and cousins. Bart was a cum laude graduate of Williston Academy where he was a member of the Chess Club, Debate Club, the school newspaper and the school yearbook, as well as holding a state record in Track. He received his Bachelor of Arts from Yale University and his Juris Doctorate from The New England School of Law, where he was his class valedictorian. He had many interests, most notably anything to do with New England sports teams, which he followed with a zealous passion. There wasn’t a math problem he couldn’t solve, and a dog he didn’t love. He was a true family man and derived his greatest pleasure from his wife, children and grandchildren.

David Gregory ’57

David Gregory, age 77 of Toney, Alabama, passed away on Sunday, Jan. 15, 2017. He is survived by his wife of 57 years Martha, daughter; Donna (Brian) Fuller, son; Matt (Jan) Gregory, two grandchildren; Alex Fuller and Madison Fuller. Mr. Gregory was preceded in death by his grandson Wesley Fuller. Mr. Gregory retired from IBM after 29 years. He was a U.S. Army veteran and a member of Mt. Zion Baptist Church and an avid Alabama fan.

Clarence L. Simpson, Jr. ’51

Mr. Clarence Lorenzo Simpson, Jr., former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court and former Attorney General of Liberia, died January 30, 2016 at his Brewerville, Liberia home. He was in his 83rd year.

Following his return home with a Law degree, Mr. Simpson, son of President Tubman’s first Vice President Clarence Lorenzo Simpson, was appointed Legal Counsel of the Ministry of Public Works.

President Tubman later called young Mr. Simpson as Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Liberia.

Following the death of President Tubman and the accession of Dr. William R. Tolbert as President of Liberia, he named Mr. Simpson as Attorney General and Minister of Justice, a job he held for a number of years.

Mr. Simpson was born on June 15, 1933 to the union of Counselor Clarence Lorenzo and his wife Mrs. Abrametta Stubblefield Simpson. He received his high school diploma from Williston Academy in Easthampton, Massachusetts, and later enrolled at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA. He later took the LLB degree from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

On July 19, 1961 he married Judith Mars Simpson in Kakata, Margibi County and this union was blessed with seven children.

His survivors include his widow, Mrs. Judith Mars Simpson; children, Clarence L. Simpson III, Mrs. Lorraine Simpson Harvey Mrs. Linda Simpson Emiroglu, Clarine Simpson Vaughn, Cheryl Simpson Cornwall, Christian and Alpha Simpson; several grand children; and sister Amanda Simpson.

Mr. Simpson, Jr., like his father, was a lifelong Episcopalian.

Jay S. Brisk ’54

Jay S. Brisk, 81, died of heart and kidney failure in Boston on June 20, 2017. He is survived by his brother and sister-in-law, Richard and Susan Brisk; sister, Hazel Buchwald; nieces, grandnieces and grandnephew. At age 14, while watching a July 4th fireworks display, he was hit by an errant rocket. Despite a long and difficult recovery, he graduated Great Neck High School while also studying piano and music composition at Julliard School of Music. A dedicated New Yorker, he graduated Columbia University, School of General Studies and later taught writing at NYU and acted in some off-off Broadway plays.

Jorge Ibarra Cuesta ’50

At age 85, Jorge Ibarra Cuesta, died in Havana on Wednesday, June 7, 2017. The influential Cuban historian was  author of works essential to understanding the process of construction of the Nation.

For his merits he was distinguished with the National Prize of Social Sciences (1996), the Ministry of Culture and the Cuban Book Institute, and the National History Award (2008), awarded by the National Union of Historians of Cuba, in both cases For the work of all life.

Born in Santiago de Cuba on August 11, 1931, he studied in that city and then in the United States. On his return, he graduated as a lawyer at the Universidad de Oriente. In the Santiago of the 50 participated in the clandestine fight against the dictatorship.

After the revolutionary triumph he worked in the National Council of Culture, joined the Revolutionary Armed Forces, worked in the ICRT and the Institute of History and was developing a consistent work in which he emphasizes his contribution to the writing of the Manual of Cuban History , Of the Political Direction of the FAR. The University of Havana was awarded the title Doctor in 1997. He was an active member of the Writers Association of Uneac.

His height as an essayist was revealed in Mambisa Ideology (1967); Approaches to Clio (1979); Nation and national culture (1981); A psychosocial analysis of the Cuban: 1898-1925 (1985); Cuba: 1898-1921, political parties and social classes (1993); Cuba: 1898-1958, structures and social processes (1996); And Máximo Gómez in the face of imperialism (2000).

About himself, with modesty, he affirmed: “I have only thought of sketching problems, revising the conceptions of the past and discussing everything. I do not pretend to have created a new school or way of seeing things. If I have made some contributions it has been in the field to stimulate discussion and criticism among my colleagues. It is true that, like every historian, I have brought to light some unpublished facts, but the interpretation I have given it is yet to be discussed. In the end, it is not I who values ​​my work more knowledge of cause, but the new promotions of historians.

When Ibarra dedicated the XVIII International Book Fair of Havana in 2009, his colleague Fernando Martínez Heredia spoke these words to extol the legacy of who now says goodbye: “Jorge has come the long way with the upstanding flag of the social scientist And the difficult militancy of the intellectual, with unshakeable honesty, a lofty and growing prestige, and an ever-fighting spirit. ”

This is a translation of the following page:  http://www.granma.cu/cuba/2017-06-07/fallecio-el-historiador-jorge-ibarra-cuesta-07-06-2017-23-06-41