Category Archives: 1960s

Douglas E. Little ’67

Douglas Edward Little, 68, of Southbury, CT, died on Sunday, November 19, 2017 in Middlebury. He was husband of the late Deborah Little. He was born on May 9th, 1949 in New Britain to Edward and Jennie Little. Douglas attended Williston Academy in Easthampton, MA. He graduated from Syracuse University and obtained his Master’s degree from Southern Connecticut State University. While an undergraduate, he became a brother of the Lamda Chi fraternity and met his future wife Deborah White. After graduation, he worked dutifully for many years as an educator for the State Of Connecticut and Department Of Correction. Towards the end of his time there, he suffered a severe stroke that, by all medical accounts, should have killed him. Fearlessly refusing to let it quell his passion for life, he learned to walk again, and spent the rest of his life happily doing whatever he wanted despite his physical limitations. His days became rife with traveling, investing, screenwriting, filmmaking, entrepreneurship, art collecting, shooting, and even treasure hunting. Even as his health deteriorated more in his final years, he never stopped dreaming of what he could achieve in the future. While no one will ever forget Douglas as the eccentric, entertaining man who handed out glow sticks and payed for things with two dollar bills just to brighten a day for others, he’ll be forever remembered by those closest to him for his greatest achievements: his enduring resolve, and the endlessly selfless manner in which he conducted himself as a son, husband, father, brother, uncle, friend, educator, and American. He was a paragon of how to live with purpose for both yourself and others. Douglas is predeceased by his father Edward, mother Jennie, daughter Phoebe, and wife Deborah. He is survived by his sons Edward and Radley, as well as his brothers Alan and William.

Marshall R. Louis ’60

 

Marshall Robert Louis, Jr., was born Jan. 26, 1943 and raised in Auburn, NY. He received his secondary education at Williston Academy, undergraduate at Yale, and graduate education at New York University.
Marshall served our nation in many roles, including at the US State Department as a Cultural Affairs Officer. After a distinguished career that included service in Zaire, Israel, Japan, Brazil, Colombia, and many other countries, he retired to central Maine.
He died after a brief battle with cancer on Nov. 11, 2017, in Bangor, Maine.
Marshall is survived by his three children, Rachel Barnett, Josh Louis, and Ana Gabriela Loius; and granddaughter, Olivia. He is also survived by his fiancée, Beth Zaccaro, and his much-loved dogs, Nor’easter, Klondike, Allegra, and Applejack. He is survived by three siblings, Tom (’62), Ken (’65), and Sue Louis. He had many friends in Milo and the Lake View Plantation area.
He was a man of many talents, a deep thinker, and had a positive impact on our nation’s international reputation. We love him, miss him, and will remember him.

James Bump ’64

James Bump, of Putnam, CT, passed away in November 2017.

Jim was born in Springfield, MA, son of C. Kilbourne and Gertrude (Lapham) Bump.

He went to Williston Academy after attending Minnechaug High School. At Westminster College, New Wilmington, PA, class of 1969, he majored in piano, after realizing that he could read music faster than text. There he began to build instruments, laying the foundation for several years of lute building and about 19 years at Old Sturbridge Village. At OSV, he demonstrated crafts and built replicas of furniture and tools, from plows to looms to a printing press, so that historical techniques could be shown without damaging the original antiques.

In the 1990’s, Jim worked as a church organist and accompanist to students, soloists and choruses. Trying a week of classes at Summer Keys, Lubec, ME, he was taken on as piano accompanist for adult amateur musicians. He fell in love with Lubec, and bought a 5 bedroom house, where he rented rooms to music students, making friends from around the world. After 10 years, he resigned from accompaniment and concentrated on hosting string quartets, in which he was always the viola.

In 2012, Jim helped to start the Northeast Connecticut Community Orchestra, which continues to meet in Ashford, CT and perform in several nearby towns.

Jim is survived by his brother Ben and sister-in-law Ellen Bump, cousins, and longtime companion Rachel Lewis and her family.

John A. Alogna ’62

John A. Alogna, 74, of Bethlehem, PA died November 5th, 2017. He was born in Wethersfield, CT, the son of first generation Italian immigrants, Ella Corinne Maturo and Michael Paul Alogna. He attended the Williston Northampton School in Easthampton, MA and went on to Dickinson College in Carlisle, PA. At a business conference, his father and future father-in-law realized they both had children attending schools in the same area (his future wife, Winifred (Wink) attended a prep school, Penn Hall, located in Chambersburg, PA). After being introduced by the fathers, John and Wink went on a first date, which must have made an impression on them both, as they recently celebrated their 49th wedding anniversary surrounded by family and friends. Upon his graduation and following their marriage, they moved to Philadelphia, PA where he received his MBA and Juris Doctorate from Temple University. John started his legal career with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in Harrisburg. After living and working in Pittsburgh and Williamsport, PA he and his growing family relocated to Bethlehem in 1981 when he joined the Fuller Company as Vice President, General Counsel and corporate Secretary. During his tenure, John expanded Fuller’s Legal Department, oversaw management of the international subsidiaries, and was instrumental in developing and implementing policies and procedures that had profound and lasting impacts on Fuller’s business. John was one of a handful of Fuller executives who collectively bought Fuller from GATX Corporation in 1986. He had significant involvement in every major endeavor Fuller pursued including the sale of the company on February 14 1990, to a Danish industrial conglomerate, F.L.Smidth & Co. John continued to serve as a director, senior vice-president and general counsel of Fuller (which later changed its name to FLSmidth Inc.) until his retirement in 2002. He was a long time board member and served several terms as Chairman of the Board of the Lehigh Valley Business Coalition on Health Care, which is the major voice and advocate of local employers on health care issues. He was also a long time board member of the national nonprofit People’s Medical Society where he played an active role in propelling the society to become one of the largest consumer health advocacy organizations in the U.S. Upon retirement, John volunteered with the Service Corp of Retired Executives where he advised entrepreneurs in business fundamentals. He was recognized in leading the Lehigh Valley chapter of SCORE to national distinction in fundraising. He also dedicated many volunteer hours with the Historic Bethlehem Society, serving on the Board of Trustees. In 2013, John was chosen as the Historic Bethlehem Society’s annual Honoree for his work on behalf of the organization. John’s love of discourse also led him to start multiple discussion groups with diverse groups of people, discussing current issues and the impact they had on society. His love of people, animals, and the environment drove him to work tirelessly to alleviate the pain of others. Even during his last days, his greatest sorrow was seeing others suffer. Survivors: John is survived by his loving wife Winifred; his son Forrest and wife Sandrine of Paris, France and their children (Lucy and Felix); his daughter Nora and husband Indrajit (Ed) of Goa, India and their children (Ella, Sachi, and Max); his son Michael and wife Elizabeth of Bethlehem, PA and their children (Wyatt, Reese, Quinn, and Cora); his son Alexander of Bethlehem, PA; daughter Marian and husband Alistair of Jersey City, NJ and their daughter (Lillian); and his youngest daughter Victoria of Dunedin, New Zealand; He is also survived by his best friend and brother Michael T. Alogna ’57 of Arlington, MA; and sister Patricia Reiss of Lake Forest, IL. His sister, Donna Edson of Clinton, NJ, predeceased him.

G. Alec Harwood ’60

George “Alec” Harwood, 75, of Homosassa, Fla., passed away August 28, 2017.
He was born in Scarsdale, N.Y. Alec was an avid computer geek and worked as an internal consultant for Hewlett Packard prior to retirement.
He is survived by his wife of 32 years, Judith Harwood of Homosassa, Fla.; two daughters, Sarah Whittemore (Mark) of Maui, Hawaii, Amy Williams of Lake Mary, Fla.; step-son, Brian Barbieri (Kim) of Salem, N.H.; brother, Hugh Harwood ‘59 (Nancy) of Aiken, S.C.; five grandchildren, Dakota, Cassidy, Makena, Jacob, and Kayley. Alec had one niece and one nephew and two great-nephews, loving family, and friends.

Stephen C. Finn ’66

Steve Finn passed peacefully in the arms of his wife Connie with his son Jeremy at his side and in the heart of his daughter Sarah at Brigham and Women’s hospital on Sunday evening, May 28, 2017. He fought a long courageous battle with many different illnesses for several years.

Steve attended Williston Academy in Northampton and Bentley College. He was the owner and President of E&J Distributors a third generation business in Northampton. Steve was among the first to break ground and move his business to the Northampton Industrial Park. Steve served on community and industry boards. In support of the Jimmy Fund, Steve organized and ran numerous Massachusetts Legislature golf tournaments.His favorite spot was Block Island and after retiring he was able to enjoy, even more, his love of sports and the outdoors. He was an avid golfer and sports fan with special love for the Red Sox and the Patriots. Steve enjoyed boating and fishing and gardening and riding his mower to make the most beautiful lawn. He loved all the birds and animals that would visit him on his deck especially his friend Mike the duck. Steve loved to travel and took numerous cruises to the Mediterranean and the Caribbean. He spent several weeks in Nevis, a gift from his friends Mike and Ronnie Hartnett. He had an amazing rock collection that he gathered on his early morning walks on the beaches of Block Island. He found heart shaped and Block Island shaped rocks that were special gifts to his nieces and nephews.

He was predeceased by his parents and his sister Barbara “Bonnie” Snyder. Steve leaves his loving wife Constance Volante Finn; his son Jeremy Finn and his wife Erika; and their four children, Liam, Rian, Kiera and Owen; his daughter Sarah Finn Cullen and her husband John; and their two children, Daniel and Justin; his brother William Finn and his partner Holly Sherick; and many nieces and nephews. There was a special place in his heart for Bill Dawkins who was a second son to him. Most important Steve was a devoted husband, father, grandfather and friend. He was a kind and generous man who loved and was loved by many.

 

 

Mark R. Berman ’69

 

Mark R. Berman, a fixture of the local business community who enjoyed a second career as a college administrator, died at his home in Williamsburg, MA on Friday, May 5, 2017, after a brief illness. He was 65.

Berman graduated from Williston Academy in 1969. He earned his undergraduate degree from Syracuse University in 1973, where he lettered in men’s swimming. He obtained an MBA and law degree from Syracuse in 1976. In 1977, Berman joined the management of Yale Genton, the venerable West Springfield clothier started by his grandfather. He served as general manager, vice president and eventually president of Yale Genton. In 2008, Berman followed his passion for education and joined the administration of American International College in Springfield as associate vice president for educational enterprise. He later became executive vice president for administration. During his tenure at AIC, Berman was instrumental in a number of major initiatives, including significant capital improvements on campus.

Throughout his business career, Berman devoted his time and talents to a host of local institutions, including as a board member at the Clarke School for the Deaf, the UMass Fine Arts Center, the Springfield Library and Museums, and Baystate Health Systems. He was a past director of the West Springfield Chamber of Commerce and a corporator at the Springfield Institute for Savings. His colleagues and associates will remember him as a leader and mentor who was wholeheartedly devoted to the institutions of which he was a part. He was a man of great personal dignity, and afforded that same dignity to everyone he met.

Berman is survived by his loving wife, Martha G. Baker; his stepchildren, Michael C. Moran and Jennifer E. Norris, and their spouses, Melissa M. Moran and William J. Norris; and his grandchildren, Claire, Ryan, Liam, and Henry. With Martha, Mark joyfully left the office behind, traveled the world, improved his golf game, read voraciously, mastered the grill, perfected the gimlet, relaxed on the beach in his beloved Westport, welcomed the arrival of four grandchildren, and relished in his new role as their “Papa.”

Daniel M. Cain ’64

cainDaniel M. Cain passed away on March 31, 2017, at his farm house in West Cornwall, CT, after an eight month battle with brain cancer. His wife of 21 years, Kathleen, was at his side at the time of his death and for every step throughout his long ordeal. In addition to his wife, Mr. Cain is survived by his son William, 20, a sophomore at Cornell University, three siblings, William Cain and Constance Decelles of Holyoke, Massachusetts and James Cain of Larchmont, New York, and numerous nieces , nephews, and in-laws.

Mr. Cain was born in Holyoke, Massachusetts, on February 24, 1945, the third of four children of William P. Cain a local plumber and Sabina (Wozniak) Cain, a homemaker. Mr. Cain’s father passed away in 1959 and his mother held things together while raising her four children, ages 9 to 18. His mother passed away in 2006.

In his senior year in high school Mr. Cain was selected as one of top 100 high school football players in the nation during the fall of 1963. His Holyoke High School team was the Western Massachusetts co-champion that year and he broke the schools rushing and scoring records, both of which stood for decades after his graduation. His skills on the grid iron along with his enthusiastic and warm personality opened the door to a full scholarship for a post graduate year at Williston Academy in Easthampton, Massachusetts. At Williston he led his team to an undefeated season while earning First Team All-New England honors. After entertaining offers from college football programs throughout the east and mid-west, including Notre Dame, Army, Columbia, Dartmouth and Holy Cross, Mr. Cain chose Brown University where he started on the freshman team before sustaining a career ending knee injury during his sophomore year.

After graduation from Brown in 1968, Mr. Cain began a career in commercial banking with the Bank of New York. Realizing at an early stage that reading estate plan documents in the bank’s trust department was not his natural calling he left the bank in 1970 for an extended tour of Europe on his BSA motorcycle. A near fatal accident in Rome encouraged him to submit an application to the MBA program at Columbia University where he graduated in 1972.

After a brief tenure in the corporate finance department at Merrill, Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Smith, Mr. Cain joined his brother, James, at a fledgling health care investment banking group within Eastdil Realty in 1974. Over the past 40 plus years Mr. Cain was regarded as one the industry’s top health care services investment bankers. He was a pioneer in the origination and execution of countless merger and acquisition transactions among non-profit and investor owned health care providers. In the 1980s his recognition that the health care industry was plagued with inefficiencies and excess capacity convinced him that the industry was ripe for consolidation, a trend that is in full bloom today. In addition, Mr. Cain executed hundreds of millions of dollars in capital raises for hospitals, physician groups and various organizations serving the health care industry.

After five years at Eastdil, Mr. Cain and his brother, James, left together to join the public finance department at Salomon Brothers where Mr. Cain served as the head of the group. While tax exempt bond financing was the focus of that group within Salomon Brothers, Mr. Cain’s real interest and passion was in bringing health care organizations together through mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures and other forms of affiliation. As a result the Cains left Salomon Brothers in late 1982 to form the firm now operating as Cain Brothers.

Mr. Cain’s brother, James, vividly recalls his father in law saying the Cain boys were crazy to leave Salomon. The Cains were making more money than most players on the New York Yankees. James remembers that they left Salomon on very good terms and were told to come back if things didn’t work out. Things did work out and 35 years later Cain Brothers is growing, prospering and is well known and highly regarded throughout the industry. Most importantly this success has occurred while maintaining a culture focused on doing right by its clients and employees.

Mr. Cain was also a founding partner of two venture capital firms-CB Health Ventures and Health Enterprise Partners. Implementing a strategy to raise capital for and within the health care industry these funds raised capital from organizations that would also be informed users of the services and products provided by the portfolio companies. Both venture funds have successfully raised and invested hundreds of millions in early stage health care service and technology companies.

Mr. Cain displayed a high level of energy and creativity. He was often ahead of his time and enjoyed developing innovative and at times overly complicated strategies for addressing a capital or strategic need that others may have address with more traditional and conventional solutions. If plain vanilla was the solution he quickly lost interest. His support team often cringed when asked to execute his game plan. That said, clients loved his creative gene and his ability to convey his enthusiasm for the work he did and the extraordinary outcome he envisioned. He was also loved by his colleagues and respected by competitors.

Entering a meeting room or event with his customary “hey sports fans” Mr. Cain would inject a jolt of energy into any event or meeting. As time passed and his dual careers as an investment banker and venture capitalist thrived his philanthropic interests grew as well. In addition to supporting his various alma maters he was a generous benefactor to many health care, educational and cultural organizations thorough the United States. He also gave of his time serving on numerous boards including the Williston-Northampton School, the Salisbury School, the Norman Rockwell Museum, the Shaker Hancock Village and the Columbia Business School.

When not in the office or the board room Mr. Cain spent his time traveling with friends and family to destinations throughout the world or tending to the needs of the several farms he owned in Connecticut, upstate New York and Virginia. He loved to burn off his high octane energy levels building stone walls or bailing hay. His West Cornwall farm served as a setting for annual Thanksgiving gatherings and touch football games for his growing immediate and extended family and many other festive occasions. His wife, a gourmet cook, would spends days preparing the proper and substantial menu and decorating the farm to reflect the event being celebrated.

His brother James said that “Dan was more than a brother, a mentor, a partner and friend.” His one great year on the football fields of Western Massachusetts opened a new world to our whole family. We were suddenly introduced to new experiences, people, organizations and attitudes outside our hometown of Holyoke, Massachusetts. Dan dragged me off the couch and onto practice fields in Holyoke, then to Williston, an Ivy League education and finally diverted my career path as a bartender and wrestling coach to one in investment banking. He had a similar and lasting impact on my siblings and their children. Dan loved his family, his farms, his friends and his business colleagues and always extended a helping hand whenever a need or an ask arose.”

The family held a private service near his farm in Litchfield County and plans to hold a memorial service at the Salisbury School within the next two months. Mr. Cain gives credit for his success in business and life to not only his family and friends and to the opportunity provided at Williston. Accordingly, the family suggests that voluntary contributions in his honor be made to the Williston Northampton School.