Tag Archives: Class of 1945

G. Arnold Haynes ’45

G. Arnold Haynes, Visionary and Pioneer Of Wellesley, MA. died peacefully on October 15, 2017 at his home; just four days before his 90th birthday. He attended Wellesley Public Schools and graduated from the Williston Academy (Easthampton, MA), Nichols Junior College (1950) and Boston University (1951). He served in the U. S. Army (1946 – 1948). Arnold was the beloved husband for 61 years of the late Carol Congdon Haynes who died on October 13, 2012. He and Carol shared passions for family, education, reading, art, and travel. Arnold formed G. Arnold Haynes, Inc. in 1953; later becoming Haynes Management Inc, a real estate development and management company based in Wellesley Hills, MA. He became a legendary residential builder and developer in Wellesley, Weston and surrounding towns. He was a visionary and one of the first pioneers to develop and build suburban office buildings along Rte. 128. Haynes Management grew to be a major commercial property owner and management company in the western suburbs of Boston. It was Arnold’s pride and joy and he actively ran the company until his death. He was also passionate about banking and was a director of Newton Cooperative Bank, Pioneer Bank and Chart Bank spanning four decades. Arnold was a creative force and generous benefactor who supported many schools and organizations, included Williston North Hampton School, the Rivers School in Weston, Vanguard School in Lake Wales, FL, Wavus Camp in Jefferson, ME, the Boy Scouts of America (Knox Trail Counsel), Cure Alzheimer’s Fund, the Castle Preservation Society in Moultonborough, NH, the Barnstormers Theatre in Tamworth, NH and the Wright Museum in Wolfeboro, NH. He was a member of the Wellesley Country Club, Bald Peak Colony Club and Mountain Lake Colony Club, where he was an avid golfer. He is survived by his three children and their spouses; Melinda and Stephen Bradley of Wellesley, MA, Jonathan and Bernadette Haynes of Boston, MA, and Andrea and Stephen Perry of Greenville, SC, and his sister Carol Nelson and long-time caregiver, Kathy Caldwell. He is also survived by his eight grandchildren, Jessica Bradley Roberson and her husband Neil, Chandler Bradley and his wife Lara-Anne, Christina Bradley, Whitney, Melissa and Meredith Haynes, Madison and Leland Perry and two great grandchildren Reid and Brooke Roberson.

Herbert Fisher ’45

Herbert Fisher of Bloomfield Hills, MI died peacefully in his sleep on September 30, 2017, aged 89. Mr. Fisher had a long career as a market research and advertising executive. He retired from corporate advertising in the 1980s to become co-founder of Allison-Fisher, Inc., a market research firm. Mr. Fisher was a graduate of Williston Academy, Harvard College and University of Chicago, where he earned a PhD in sociology. Among his numerous non-profit endeavors, he served as a Trustee of Cranbrook School. He is survived by his wife of 68 years, Ann (“Betty”) Dederick Fisher, his four children, eight grandchildren and one great grandchild. The family plans a private service in the Bahamas.

Persis Brown Smith ’45

On June 16th, 2017 Persis B. Smith passed away after a brief illness at Brookdale Place in Colorado Springs. She was 91 years old.

She was born in Colorado Springs on February 24, 1926. She was the daughter of the late Alfred Brown and Lucy Jones Brown. Dr. Brown was the superintendent of the Colorado School for the Deaf and Blind for many years.

Persis was the granddaughter of Asa T. Jones, a Colorado Springs pioneer who came to cure his tuberculosis from Spencer, Massachusetts. He was a leading businessman in Colorado Springs and “gave birth to many charities” (Sun newspaper, July 24, 1972). He built the Cheyenne Building now home to Phantom Canyon Brewing Company on the corner of Pikes Peak and Cascade Avenue.

Persis went to Columbia Elementary School, North Junior High and the Colorado Springs School before graduating from the Williston Northampton School for Girls in Easthampton, Mass. She graduated from Vassar College and received a Masters Degree at the University of Denver in child psychology. She worked at the Rocky Mountain Rehabilitation Center in Colorado Springs for 15 years.

Persis was married four times to wonderful men. First, to the late Wessel Ruhtencrantz Von Ruhtenberg and then to John Max Wolf of the Wolf Ranch in Black Forest. She later married Myron Wood, the well-known photographer. Finally, she was married to the late Dr. Robert Smith for 22 years. He preceded her in death at 99 years in 2012. He was one of the founding doctors of the Colorado Springs Medical Center.

Persis Smith was an accomplished painter, studying for years under the well-known local artist Herman Raymond. She was a member of the Broadmoor Garden Club, Tuesday Club and the Colonial Dames Society. She volunteered for years at Silver Key, was a member of Grace and St. Stephens Episcopal Church and was an active member of and donor to the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center.

She is survived by her daughters, Lucy Lewis of Colorado Springs, Persis Schlosser of Castle Rock, Colorado, five grandchildren, one great-grandchild and eleven step-children.

Lafayette Keeney ’45

keeneyLafayette “Laf” Keeney, 89, of Fenwick in Old Saybrook, husband of the late Janet (Hale) Keeney (2002), entered into eternal peace, Thursday, February 18, 2016 at Yale New Haven Hospital. Lafayette was born on December 18, 1926 in Somersville, CT and was the youngest of six children of Ralph and Julia (Allen) Keeney. He grew up in Somersville and attended Valley Forge Military Academy (not as a problem child, he really wanted to go), received his high school diploma from Norwich University and his college diploma from Nichols College. He served honorably in the United States Army as part of the force that occupied Germany at the conclusion of World War II. He married Janet Hale of Portland, CT in August 1950 and moved to Somers, CT where they raised their family of three sons. Each is married today and Lafayette proudly has eight grandchildren and five great grandchildren. He spent his entire business life at Sage-Allen & Co., a specialty department store headquartered in Hartford until his retirement as Chairman and CEO in 1990. Throughout his professional career, Lafayette served on the boards of many local companies and institutions including the Hartford Chamber of Commerce, Arthur A. Watson & Co., Fleet Bank, Hartford Hospital, St. Francis Hospital, Suffield Academy, and Nichols College. He was a sixty year Mason and a member of Composite Lodge #28 in Suffield and a member of Royal Order of Jesters, Court #141 in Hartford. He was the longest serving member and past Commodore of the Canoe Club in East Hartford. He was a member of the Westbrook Elks Lodge 1784. He was a member of the First Church of Christ in Old Saybrook. Lafayette and Janet built their dream house and moved to the Fenwick section of Old Saybrook in 1988. He was very active in the community serving many years as a member of the Board of Burgesses and elected to three terms as Warden. He had a lifelong passion for the New York Yankees and was at the Stadium when Don Larsen pitched the perfect game in the 1956 World Series. He enjoyed coffee and conversation each morning with his buddies in Old Saybrook. They spent many hours planning the annual Scum Beach Picnic. His door was always open for old friends to visit and if he wasn’t at his house, odds were you could find him on the golf course or chasing bluefish up and down the beach. Lafayette is survived by his three sons, Frank D. Keeney and his wife Beverly of Old Saybrook, CT, Ralph D. Keeney and his wife Cathy of Cortland, NY, and Jeffrey H. Keeney and his wife Caryn of Portland, OR; a sister, Julia Ann Walton and her husband Bill of Fenwick; eight grandchildren; five great grandchildren. Besides his wife Janet, Lafayette was predeceased by a granddaughter, Emily; three brothers, Norm, Bud, and Tom; and a sister, Caroline.

James G. Rogers ’45

Dr. James Gladney Rogers succumbed to heart failure, complicated by advanced Alzheimer’s Disease, at Loma Linda Hospital, California, on October 5, 2016, his daughter Becky’s birthday. He died as he lived – gently, with dignity, and accompanied by loving family.

Jim was born in Stamford, Connecticut to James Thomas Rogers and Miriam Pomeroy Rogers on November 20, 1927. He was their only child and was adored by them both. As a young child, he moved with his parents to Texas, where his father founded a miniature, duck pin bowling alley, followed by a tract of homes in Ft. Worth. When a freak hail storm blew all the roofs off of the homes before any of them had been sold, his father had to declare bankruptcy and move the family to Chicago where they lived briefly with his father’s sister, Lillian, her husband, Jack Agar, their daughter, Joyce, and their son, Jack. Jim’s father began work at the Agar Meat Packing Company. After several years the family moved suddenly to Southern California in order to save the health of both Jim and his father, who had both contracted Rheumatic Fever.

In California, they settled in Sun Valley, where his father set up a fruit stand near a local park, then advanced to a partnership in a hardware store in Tujunga, where the family then moved. It was here that Jim’s father suffered his first, devastating, stroke that paralyzed the left side of his body. After a year of hospitalization at the Veterans Hospital in Santa Monica, the family left California to be near his mother’s family in Connecticut. They traveled across country in a new ’37 Dodge. His father died from another stroke seven years after his first one. Jim was 16 years old.

Jim and his mother moved back to Southern California where she, with her Bachelor’s degree from Connecticut Women’s College, was able to contribute to, and eventually support, the family. She wrote regular articles for the Fuller Brush Newsletter, the Bristler. She also contributed articles and interviews with Hollywood celebrities, to several popular movie magazines. Due to her work, she enjoyed complimentary tickets to the Academy Awards every year.

Jim was a true intellectual. He was notoriously well-read and could quote poetry and prose appropriately in almost any situation–including poems by his mother, Miriam, who was a beautiful poet. He graduated from Williston Academy in Easthampton, Massachusetts in 1945. He studied music as an undergrad at Yale, where he also explored other interests, from ethnomusicology and singing to languages and physics. He graduated in 1949. His first job after moving back to Southern California was at Eastman Kodak, then as an optical engineer at Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation (1950-1956). He eventually became a Human Factors Engineer at Hughes Aircraft, first in Culver City, then in Fullerton, California, which led him to work on top-secret projects that the family still doesn’t know much about. During this period he went back to graduate school at UCLA, earning his Masters in Engineering in 1962 and another Masters in Psychology in 1970. He received his Doctorate in Psychology from UCLA in 1973, eventually becoming a psychology professor at San Bernardino State University. His granddaughter Katherine writes, “Much of my earliest interest in psychology came from Gramps, inspired by his stories of the Stanley Milgram shock experiments and by my own perusal of the (now outdated) psychoanalytic theory books at my grandparents’ house in Crestline, California. Every Christmas, when Nana and Gramps came to visit, I enjoyed telling Gramps about whatever I was learning in school at the time. He was enthusiastic and seemed to legitimately enjoy these things as much as I did.”

Jim was a lifelong musician. He performed regularly as a tenor soloist in community productions of Gilbert and Sullivan operettas, Bach Oratorios, Menotti’s Amahl and the Night Visitors, and annually at performances of Handel’s Messiah. He was the Choir Director for 35 years at St Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Fullerton, California. He composed anthems, descants, antiphons, and responses, many of which were published.

Jim’s family life was interconnected with his music skills. He met his wife, Nancy Odelle Bejach Rogers, in the choir at All Saints Episcopal Church in Beverly Hills. They married on May 18, 1951, and celebrated their first anniversary at the Good Samaritan Hospital in downtown Los Angeles, where their daughter, Deborah Anne was born. Four years later came Rebecca Katherine and the family was complete. The family has many fond memories of singing rounds and four-part harmony on their way to camping in Yosemite and Sequoia National Parks. All of “Jim’s Girls” also sang in his choirs. Nancy and Jim celebrated 65 years of marriage this last May.

Jim leaves behind his wife, Nancy Rogers, in Crestline, California; his daughter, the Rev. Deborah Magdalene, in Wappingers Falls, New York; his daughter, Dr. Rebecca Lyman, in Rexburg, Idaho; eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren, with one on the way.

John D. Anthony, Jr. ’45

john anthonyCDR. John David Anthony, Jr. USNRET. died on April 17, 2016. John is survived by his loving wife, Susie, their 5 children, 13 grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren. Born in Detroit, MI in 1927, he grew up on Cape Cod during the Great Depression. Enlisting in the Navy during the Korean conflict in 1948, he became a fighter pilot, served honorably for 25 years and retired in 1971 to Jacksonville, FL. That year John began his lifelong entrepreneurial pursuits, which culminated in his and Susie’s final business, the Bayard Country Store antique mall, the first in Jacksonville. They joyfully retired to St. Augustine, FL in 2001, and John played golf, his passion, to the very end.

Robert Treat ’45

Robert TreatRobert Fuller Treat was born on March 6, 1927, in Hartford, Conn. He was the son of Merritt W. and Frances K. Treat.
Bob attended school in West Hartford, Conn., and graduated from the Williston Academy in 1945. After graduating, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy, where he received numerous medals. After the Navy, he graduated from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design. He was associated with the family business of Clapp & Treat Hardware in Hartford, Conn., while further pursuits included working for a tour company in Europe, where he did extensive traveling. After returning to the U.S., he worked for Western Publishing in New York City.

In 1961, Bob married Sigrid Johnson, daughter of Carl and Thelma Johnson of Baltimore. Former residents of West Hartford, Conn., and Ridgewood, N.J., the Treats moved in 1971 to Oxford, on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, where he and Sigrid raised two children. He continued to put his entrepreneurial skills to work in his Easton retail business, Chelsea Cupboard, until retirement.

While in retirement, Bob was a volunteer to the Easton Water fowl Festival for many years. He also had a keen interest in gardening and could be found throughout Oxford helping residents keep their gardens beautiful. He loved all Oxford had to offer. He was a member of the Tred Avon Yacht Club and the Easton Lions Club. On any given day, he would ride his bicycle through town to catch up with friends along the way.

Survivors include his wife of 54 years, Sigrid Treat of Oxford; two children, Carl Treat and his wife Michael of Easton, and Alison Dalley and her husband Richard of Lambertville, N.J.; and a granddaughter, Kristin Treat.

At Bob’s request, his body was donated for the advancement of science.

Nancy Morse Willeson ’45

Nancy MorseNancy Lee (Morse) Willeson, A.K.A. Nancy Maxwell-Willeson, aged 87 went to be with her Lord April 18.

Nancy was living in Palm Harbor, FL. She was born January 20, 1928 in Wellesley Hills, MA, to Roger Earle & Gladys Carr Morse. She spent summers as a child at the family farm in Francestown, N.H., and also at the family cottage in Chatham, Cape Cod, MA. She graduated from Northampton School For Girls, in Northampton, MA, and she also graduated from Principia College in Elsah, IL.

She married Ronald (Max) Maxwell-Willeson Sept. 6, 1952, and brought up her four children in Wayland, MA and later in Chatham, MA.

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James Gillchrest, Jr ’45

GillchrestJames A. Gillchrest, Jr., 88, died peacefully at home, surrounded by his loving family, on Wednesday, April 1, 2015. Born in Thomaston on Nov. 28, 1926, he was the son of James, Sr. and Eva Demuth Gillchrest. He began his education in Thomaston, and later graduated from Williston Academy in Northampton, Mass.

Following high school, Jim enlisted in the U.S. Navy, serving during World War II. After being honorably discharged, he attended University of Maine at Orono, earning a Bachelor of Science in 1949. While at UMO, Jim was a member of the Phi Eta Kappa Fraternity.

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Joan Penfield Begg ’45

PennfieldJoan Farist Penfield Begg, formerly of Trumbull and Falls Village, died peacefully November 13, 2014 at Connecticut Hospice, Branford, CT at the age of 87.

Born in Bridgeport, CT on March 1, 1927 to Joel Farist Penfield and Ethel Logan Penfield., she was a longtime resident of the Nichols section of Trumbull, CT and Falls Village, CT.

She graduated from Northhampton School for Girls, Endicott College and earned a B.S. in Dental Hygiene from the University of Bridgeport. She has been a Member of Trinity Episcopal Church, Nichols, CT for nearly sixty years, a member of Salisbury Arsenal Chapter of the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, Associate member Freelove Baldwin Stow Chapter, Milford, CT, The National Society Colonial Dames XVII, the Winthrop Fleet Chapter, Salisbury, CT, Past President National Society Magna Carta Dames, National Society Daughters of American Colonists, CT Chapter.

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