Tag Archives: Class of 1964

Carolyn Clarke Brown ’64

Carolyn Clarke Brown, 73, was born in Northampton, Massachusetts on March 15 (the “Ides of March”), 1946 and died in Rockport, Maine on Oct. 26, 2019. Her parents were Bertram W. Clarke and Katherine Knight Clarke.

At age 16, Carolyn was thrown from a horse and sustained a severe concussion. For two weeks, she hovered on the threshold of death and was not expected to survive. However, she recovered and came to regard all the subsequent years of her life as “extra years.” Those who knew and loved her would argue that there were not enough “extra years.”

Carolyn attended high school initially in the public school system in Williamsburg, Mass. before enrolling in the Northampton School for Girls (now the Williston Northampton School), from which she graduated in 1964. She attended the University of Maine at Orono, earning a B.A. in 1968 and an MLS in 1974. One unique feature of Carolyn’s life is that she had a single job interview in 1968, which launched a 46-year career as an academic librarian at the University of Southern Maine (USM) in Portland. She left the University in 2014 as head of acquisitions and serials services in the library.

She married William B. Hughes in 1982; he died in 1992. She began a long-term relationship with Scott W. Brown in the mid-1990s; they married in 2014. Their wedding has the distinction of (probably) being the only one to have ever taken place at the USM library. Carolyn and Scott did everything together, ranging from activities that were mundane (going to the store or post office) to strenuous (hiking, building walking trails, renovating a barn) to just plain fun (cooking, road trips in their red antique Corvette convertible).

Carolyn was an exceptionally warm, kind, friendly, and generous person who was always willing to pitch in and help. Many describe her as one of the nicest people they had ever met. She loved cooking, as evidenced by her 500-plus cookbook collection. She especially loved cats, and owned many over the years. She loved them all, but her favorite was a one-eyed stray female from a shelter that Scott named MQ (for Monocular Quadruped). MQ was smart, loving, and feisty, just like her owner.

Carolyn’s maternal ancestors were centered in New York and New Jersey, and tended to be educated professionals. In contrast, her paternal ancestors were DownEasters from Machiasport, Maine and they went to sea. Her forebears include numerous sea captains, mariners, and sailors of ships both large and small. Her father and an uncle were crew members on Howard Hughes’ yacht “The Southern Cross” in the 1930s. Another uncle served on Atlantic convoy ships in World War II. Carolyn and Scott have spent many enjoyable times at the family salt water farm in Machiasport, built by a sea captain ancestor in 1841. One particularly interesting marine artifact at the farm is the log book of a great-grandfather who operated the schooner “Saarbruck” in the 1870s. The “Saarbruck” shipped cargo between Machiasport, New York, and Rio de Janeiro.

Carolyn is survived by her husband, Scott of Union and Machiasport; adopted stepchildren, Donna L. Boyle of South Portland and William D. Hughes of Westbrook along with their families; and a cousin, Dawn Woodbrey of Orono and her family. A life-long friend was Judy Carloni of Shapleigh and Englewood, Fla., who Carolyn met when they were both age 3; they remained friends for the next 70 years.

According to her wishes, Carolyn will be buried in the East Union, Maine cemetery alongside Scott’s relatives. A gathering of friends and family to celebrate her life will be held in both Union and Machiasport in the spring.

Carolyn would wish that any donations made should be directed to a local animal shelter, especially to provide support for stray cats.

Barbara Santaniello Brown ’64

Barbara Jean (Sanders) Brown, age 72, went to be with the Lord on June 25, 2019 after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease. She was born in Springfield, Massachusetts on July 28, 1946. She was a graduate of Williston Northampton School and Elmira College. After college, she married the love of her life, James H. Brown with whom she lived a blessed and glorious life for 50 years. She was a member of First Presbyterian Church in Knoxville, Knoxville Christian Women’s Connection, Knoxville Symphony League, and a lifetime member of Presbyterian Women. She was involved in many organizations in Knoxville as well as in Erie, Pennsylvania.

Barbara is preceded in death by her parents, Jean Atkinson and Donald Santaniello.

She is survived by her husband, James H. Brown, her sister Carol Kelley ’66, both of Knoxville, her brother, Joseph Santaniello and wife Angela of Massachusetts, nephew, Jim Lepine and wife Jennifer of Cummings, GA, niece, Jackie Delorm and husband Rob of East Berne, New York, sister-in-law, Jeanie Belhobek and husband George of Pepper Pike, OH, 2 great nephews and 1 great niece, Goddaughter Shelby Brooks and husband Tracy, special friend and caregiver, Alisa Jones and husband Chris, all of Knoxville. She will be greatly missed by many.

A celebration of life will be held on Saturday, June 29 at 2:00 pm at First Presbyterian Church at 620 State St., Knoxville, TN 37902. Barbara’s family will receive friends following the service. In lieu of flowers, memorials in Barbara’s name may be made to First Presbyterian Church.

Glenn F. Swanson ’64

Glenn Frank “Swanee” Swanson passed away on April 26, 2019 at his home in Easthampton, MA at the age of 73. He had just finished chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer and the cause of death was sudden and unexpected, but he did not suffer and his family is thankful for that. He will be remembered as a dedicated teacher, loving father, and supportive friend. Swanee was born in 1946 in Brockton, MA to Frank and Maida (Grinnell) Swanson. He graduated from the Williston Northampton School in Easthampton, MA, where he served as both proctor and captain of the soccer team and also played basketball and baseball. He attended Haverford College, graduating in 1968 with a degree in history, after which he returned to Williston as a teacher of history, and philosophy. He also earned a Masters in history from UMass Amherst. During his 46 years at Williston, he also coached many sports, and served as the Dean of Students for 17 years.

Click here to view the full obituary.

James Bump ’64

James Bump, of Putnam, CT, passed away in November 2017.

Jim was born in Springfield, MA, son of C. Kilbourne and Gertrude (Lapham) Bump.

He went to Williston Academy after attending Minnechaug High School. At Westminster College, New Wilmington, PA, class of 1969, he majored in piano, after realizing that he could read music faster than text. There he began to build instruments, laying the foundation for several years of lute building and about 19 years at Old Sturbridge Village. At OSV, he demonstrated crafts and built replicas of furniture and tools, from plows to looms to a printing press, so that historical techniques could be shown without damaging the original antiques.

In the 1990’s, Jim worked as a church organist and accompanist to students, soloists and choruses. Trying a week of classes at Summer Keys, Lubec, ME, he was taken on as piano accompanist for adult amateur musicians. He fell in love with Lubec, and bought a 5 bedroom house, where he rented rooms to music students, making friends from around the world. After 10 years, he resigned from accompaniment and concentrated on hosting string quartets, in which he was always the viola.

In 2012, Jim helped to start the Northeast Connecticut Community Orchestra, which continues to meet in Ashford, CT and perform in several nearby towns.

Jim is survived by his brother Ben and sister-in-law Ellen Bump, cousins, and longtime companion Rachel Lewis and her family.

Daniel M. Cain ’64

cainDaniel M. Cain passed away on March 31, 2017, at his farm house in West Cornwall, CT, after an eight month battle with brain cancer. His wife of 21 years, Kathleen, was at his side at the time of his death and for every step throughout his long ordeal. In addition to his wife, Mr. Cain is survived by his son William, 20, a sophomore at Cornell University, three siblings, William Cain and Constance Decelles of Holyoke, Massachusetts and James Cain of Larchmont, New York, and numerous nieces , nephews, and in-laws.

Mr. Cain was born in Holyoke, Massachusetts, on February 24, 1945, the third of four children of William P. Cain a local plumber and Sabina (Wozniak) Cain, a homemaker. Mr. Cain’s father passed away in 1959 and his mother held things together while raising her four children, ages 9 to 18. His mother passed away in 2006.

In his senior year in high school Mr. Cain was selected as one of top 100 high school football players in the nation during the fall of 1963. His Holyoke High School team was the Western Massachusetts co-champion that year and he broke the schools rushing and scoring records, both of which stood for decades after his graduation. His skills on the grid iron along with his enthusiastic and warm personality opened the door to a full scholarship for a post graduate year at Williston Academy in Easthampton, Massachusetts. At Williston he led his team to an undefeated season while earning First Team All-New England honors. After entertaining offers from college football programs throughout the east and mid-west, including Notre Dame, Army, Columbia, Dartmouth and Holy Cross, Mr. Cain chose Brown University where he started on the freshman team before sustaining a career ending knee injury during his sophomore year.

After graduation from Brown in 1968, Mr. Cain began a career in commercial banking with the Bank of New York. Realizing at an early stage that reading estate plan documents in the bank’s trust department was not his natural calling he left the bank in 1970 for an extended tour of Europe on his BSA motorcycle. A near fatal accident in Rome encouraged him to submit an application to the MBA program at Columbia University where he graduated in 1972.

After a brief tenure in the corporate finance department at Merrill, Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Smith, Mr. Cain joined his brother, James, at a fledgling health care investment banking group within Eastdil Realty in 1974. Over the past 40 plus years Mr. Cain was regarded as one the industry’s top health care services investment bankers. He was a pioneer in the origination and execution of countless merger and acquisition transactions among non-profit and investor owned health care providers. In the 1980s his recognition that the health care industry was plagued with inefficiencies and excess capacity convinced him that the industry was ripe for consolidation, a trend that is in full bloom today. In addition, Mr. Cain executed hundreds of millions of dollars in capital raises for hospitals, physician groups and various organizations serving the health care industry.

After five years at Eastdil, Mr. Cain and his brother, James, left together to join the public finance department at Salomon Brothers where Mr. Cain served as the head of the group. While tax exempt bond financing was the focus of that group within Salomon Brothers, Mr. Cain’s real interest and passion was in bringing health care organizations together through mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures and other forms of affiliation. As a result the Cains left Salomon Brothers in late 1982 to form the firm now operating as Cain Brothers.

Mr. Cain’s brother, James, vividly recalls his father in law saying the Cain boys were crazy to leave Salomon. The Cains were making more money than most players on the New York Yankees. James remembers that they left Salomon on very good terms and were told to come back if things didn’t work out. Things did work out and 35 years later Cain Brothers is growing, prospering and is well known and highly regarded throughout the industry. Most importantly this success has occurred while maintaining a culture focused on doing right by its clients and employees.

Mr. Cain was also a founding partner of two venture capital firms-CB Health Ventures and Health Enterprise Partners. Implementing a strategy to raise capital for and within the health care industry these funds raised capital from organizations that would also be informed users of the services and products provided by the portfolio companies. Both venture funds have successfully raised and invested hundreds of millions in early stage health care service and technology companies.

Mr. Cain displayed a high level of energy and creativity. He was often ahead of his time and enjoyed developing innovative and at times overly complicated strategies for addressing a capital or strategic need that others may have address with more traditional and conventional solutions. If plain vanilla was the solution he quickly lost interest. His support team often cringed when asked to execute his game plan. That said, clients loved his creative gene and his ability to convey his enthusiasm for the work he did and the extraordinary outcome he envisioned. He was also loved by his colleagues and respected by competitors.

Entering a meeting room or event with his customary “hey sports fans” Mr. Cain would inject a jolt of energy into any event or meeting. As time passed and his dual careers as an investment banker and venture capitalist thrived his philanthropic interests grew as well. In addition to supporting his various alma maters he was a generous benefactor to many health care, educational and cultural organizations thorough the United States. He also gave of his time serving on numerous boards including the Williston-Northampton School, the Salisbury School, the Norman Rockwell Museum, the Shaker Hancock Village and the Columbia Business School.

When not in the office or the board room Mr. Cain spent his time traveling with friends and family to destinations throughout the world or tending to the needs of the several farms he owned in Connecticut, upstate New York and Virginia. He loved to burn off his high octane energy levels building stone walls or bailing hay. His West Cornwall farm served as a setting for annual Thanksgiving gatherings and touch football games for his growing immediate and extended family and many other festive occasions. His wife, a gourmet cook, would spends days preparing the proper and substantial menu and decorating the farm to reflect the event being celebrated.

His brother James said that “Dan was more than a brother, a mentor, a partner and friend.” His one great year on the football fields of Western Massachusetts opened a new world to our whole family. We were suddenly introduced to new experiences, people, organizations and attitudes outside our hometown of Holyoke, Massachusetts. Dan dragged me off the couch and onto practice fields in Holyoke, then to Williston, an Ivy League education and finally diverted my career path as a bartender and wrestling coach to one in investment banking. He had a similar and lasting impact on my siblings and their children. Dan loved his family, his farms, his friends and his business colleagues and always extended a helping hand whenever a need or an ask arose.”

The family held a private service near his farm in Litchfield County and plans to hold a memorial service at the Salisbury School within the next two months. Mr. Cain gives credit for his success in business and life to not only his family and friends and to the opportunity provided at Williston. Accordingly, the family suggests that voluntary contributions in his honor be made to the Williston Northampton School.