Tag Archives: Northampton School for Girls

Barbara Seabury Engel ’48

Barbara “Bobi” Seabury Engel, age 89, passed away April 12, 2019 in Naples, Florida. Bobi was born on February 9, 1930 in Springfield, MA. She was the daughter of Raymond M. Seabury of Longmeadow, MA and Laura Barker of Newport, RI. Bobi was predeceased by her sister Margaret (Seabury) Lyman, her brother Raymond Seabury, Jr., her daughter Cynthia Engel and her grandson, Joshua Sasen. Bobi is survived by her husband, Dr. N. Eugene “Gene” Engel. She is also survived by her sons Phillip Johnson of Salem, MA, David Engel of Easley, South Carolina, Donald Engel and his wife Donna of Naples, FL; her daughters Laura Lovell and her husband Ross of East Haddam, CT, Christine Sasen of Springfield, Carolyn Brennan and her husband Thomas of Wilbraham and Zandra Engel of Agawam, MA; ten grandchildren, and several great-grandchildren. Bobi grew up in Longmeadow. She was a resident of Wilbraham and Brewster before moving to Naples, FL in 1995. Bobi attended the Northampton School for Girls and the House in the Pines Junior College majoring in Art History. Bobi was a former member of the Junior League of Springfield, the Dennis Yacht Club of E. Dennis and the League Club of Naples. Bobi served as the Director of Youth Programs for both the Wilbraham United Church and the Dennis Yacht Club. Bobi was a proud member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She was an avid bridge player, loved to dance, athlete, painter, craft lady, dramatist and had her most fun as a puppeteer. Bobi and her husband Gene were blessed to travel throughout the world after retirement. A Memorial Service will be held at 11:00 a.m. on June 20th at Bethlehem Church, 123 Allen St., Hampden, MA. There will be a private burial service. Memorial donations in Bobi’s name may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 225 N. Michigan Ave., Fl. 17, Chicago, IL 60601 or at www.alz.org

Margaret Moore Eckman ’45


Margaret Moore Eckman, 91, died on January 18, 2018 at her home in Bremen, Maine. She was born in Chester, Connecticut on January 1, 1927, the last of five children to Ernst D. and Elsie (Warner) Moore. She is survived by her husband of 65 years, Roland Eckman; two sons, Andrew and John; five grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. There will be no service, and burial will be private.

Margaret Ould Bell Craig ’36


Mrs. Margaret Ould Bell Craig, died April 24, 2019 in Middletown R.I. at the age of 99. She graduated from Northampton School for Girls in 1936, and from Wellesley College in 1940. After raising four daughters with her husband Frederick E. Craig in N.J. they enjoyed many happy retirement years in Rhode Island near the ocean. She is survived by four daughters, three grandchildren, and 3 great grandchildren.

Claire Neiley Moss ’46

Claire Neiley Moss was born in Binghamton, New York in 1928. She began her education in the Endicott Public Schools, later attending Northampton School for Girls, Skidmore College, Boston State Teacher’s College, and Harvard University. A resident of Cambridge, Massachusetts for more than sixty-five years, she was active in schools, church, and community affairs. During the 1960’s, Claire was the first director of the Roxbury-Belmont Summer Program, a summer school that preceded the formal integration of the Boston and area public schools. Claire taught in Westwood and later in Belmont for thirty-one years. Upon retirement, she was a field supervisor for education students at Harvard University. Claire also worked with Amnesty International in London and with The Tuesday Meals Program at First Parish Unitarian Universalist Church in Harvard Square. In 1983 she married Van Wood. They traveled and enjoyed life together for many years. She loved the arts and was herself artistic. Her family, her students, and her friends will remember Claire for her kindness, her devotion to social justice, her passion for both teaching and learning, and her love of life. She met life challenges by always working toward good possibilities ahead. Claire was pre-deceased by her husband Van (2007) and by her three brothers Dick (1988), Bob (2011) and Chick (2015). She is survived by her two daughters Molly Moss (David) and Kate Moss Manski (Chuck), as well as her four grandchildren including Ben Manski (Sarah), Becca Manski, Anna Rosenbluth (Paul), and Peter Rosenbluth (Milvi), and by six great-grandchildren: Alex, Hannah, Aivi, Lev, Miku, and Isaac. If you wish to make donations in honor of Claire, please consider The Tuesday Meals Program at First Parish Unitarian Universalist Church in Cambridge, Amnesty International, or Planned Parenthood. Claire worked all her life for a better world. A memorial for family and close friends will be scheduled at a later time.

Ellen von Hofen Beckman ’42


Ellen Beckman, a longtime resident of Kirkwood, Missouri, beloved wife of the late Robert Page Beckman, died in peace in Glen Carbon, Illinois, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2018.

Born Jan. 21, 1924, in Cranford, New Jersey, Ellen resided in Massachusetts most of her young adult life. She graduated from Smith College in 1947 and completed her M.A. degree in 1967 from University of Missouri. Ellen worked as assistant librarian at Kirkwood High School from 1970 to 1980.

Ellen loved to read, learn and travel. She is survived by three children, Ericka Beckman (Richard) Baim, Alan (Jenny) Beckman and Keith (Gloria) Beckman, and two granddaughters, Lindsay A. and Sarah J. Beckman.

Maria Burgee Dwight LeVesconte ’52

By day, a barefooted Mimi Dwight sang along to Joni Mitchell as she drove a station wagon full of her five children and a shedding Saint Bernard around the streets of Holyoke, Massachusetts. In the evenings, she met in back rooms to organize for social justice in her community and beyond.

Born and raised in Holyoke, she was the youngest daughter of Henry and Marcelle Burgee. Her adolescence at the Northampton School for Girls earned the comment on her report card that “Mimi is a good student, but she seems inordinately interested in boys.” They were interested back.

At Bryn Mawr College in the early 1950s, she joined her first protest march. Her zeal for social justice led her inadvertently to the field of gerontology, which became her passion and profession.

In Massachusetts she was known as Mimi Dwight. Under that name, she co-founded the Urban Ministries (a multi-faith coalition dedicated to participatory government within the inner city of Holyoke); she served on the Commission on the Status of Women, the State Welfare Commission, and the Housing Finance Agency, among others. In the early 1970s, she braved local and state politics to create the nation’s first municipal Geriatric Authority, spearheading the successful effort to turn an outdated Municipal Home into a groundbreaking geriatric rehabilitation center. The building was later named in her honor.

Propelled by her interest in the challenges she saw in the field of aging, she enrolled at Hampshire College to finish the bachelor’s degree she had postponed in favor of marriage and children. When she learned that Hampshire would not accept any credits from her two years at Bryn Mawr, she resolutely set out to complete her Hampshire degree in one year.

After graduating, she loaded her two youngest into a quirky car and drove cross-country to get a master’s degree in Gerontology from the University of Southern California. In Los Angeles she became Maria Dwight, a single mother raising two boys and beginning a career that would see her rise to become a world-renowned visionary in the field of aging.

She joined Gerontological Planning Associates as vice president in 1975 and in 1982 formed her own company, Gerontological Services Inc. GSI became a national advocate for participatory planning for services and facilities for older adults. Focusing on primary data collected directly from older people, GSI developed operational, design and marketing plans for innovative approaches for its clients, who included LGBTQ, Born Deaf, Chinese-American, Japanese American, Native American, Religious Women, expatriates in Mexico and Costa Rica, faith based long term care and housing providers, hospitals, developers, architects, cities, towns, day centers, CCRCs and moderate-income housing projects.

Among achievements too numerous to list, she served on the Board of Overseers of Brandeis University, on the Boards of Centura Health System (Denver), Stonewall Communities (Boston), Wise and Healthy Aging (Los Angeles), the Williston Northampton School and, most recently, Friends House in Santa Rosa, CA.

For 30 years, Maria taught at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design’s summer session; she presented at Harvard’s Schools of Medicine and Public Health; at MIT, UMass, Boston University School of Medicine; at California University of San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego and Irvine; and her alma mater, the USC School of Gerontology. She testified before the United States House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor and the United States Senate Committee on Housing and Urban Affairs.

She was a frequent speaker at international conferences including AHSA Asian Conference India, Asian Health Conference Singapore, International Association of Homes and Services for the Aging Conferences, as well as “Quo Vadis” in Berlin. Maria was appointed to the White House Conference on Aging, National Advisory Committee in 1981 and also served it as a delegate, advocating for the integration of housing and services. Her work was recognized with countless awards, culminating in the “Continuing Care Hall of Fame Lifetime Achievement Award” in 2017.

She was an intrepid traveler who migrated with the reindeer in the Arctic and marched with the penguins in the Antarctic (as well as lots of warm and exotic places in between).

Maria’s small rented bungalow in Santa Monica was never empty. She fed and mothered a vast extended family of skate rats, actors, hard-core musicians, activists, surfers, students, co-workers, artists and writers, as well as her own brood. She was equally comfortable with Senators, Governors and CEOs as with members of the Flesh Eaters, Dream Syndicate and Sonic Youth. And she was admired and adored by them all.

Maria leaves four children: Bill Dwight (Lida Lewis) of Northampton, Lili Dwight (Byron Coley) of Deerfield, Valle Dwight (Phil O’Donoghue) of Florence, and Ryan Dwight of Huntington Beach, California, as well as eight grandchildren: Eli Dwight, Hudson and Addison Coley, Tim and Aidan O’Donoghue, and Ella, Liam and Dylan Dwight. She is also survived by her sister, Paula Gallup ’49 (John Gallup), of Longmeadow, as well as many nieces and nephews. Her husband, Edward LeVesconte; and her son, Timothy Monk Dwight, pre-deceased her.

The family is planning memorial services for later this summer; one at her home in the redwoods of Northern California, and the second in her childhood haunts of western Massachusetts.

Donations in her honor may be made to Whole Children, 41 Russell St, Hadley, MA 01035; www.wholechildren.org.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that you elect a woman President in 2020.

Read more about Maria in the Spring 2016 issue of the Bulletin.

Judith Balise Stein ’45

Judith Balise Stein peacefully passed away on the morning of May 6, 2019 at home surrounded by her loving family. She was born in Northampton in 1928 and attended The Northampton School for Girls followed by graduation from Smith College. She worked on a fellowship at Harvard School of Public Health for a year during which time she married Richard Stein, professor of Chemistry at the University of Massachusetts. She further earned a graduate degree of education from UMass and resided in Amherst. She choose to play a supporting role in her husband’s career and raised four daughters before venturing into her interest in real estate and established a successful rental property business.

Judy traveled the world with her husband to numerous countries including Japan, China, Russia, United Arab Emirates, India, Sweden, England, France, Germany and Italy. Judy would love to experience the local culture and would leave behind a bit of her American way of thinking.

Summers were spent at their Lake Wyola cottage which always had an open door welcoming extended family and friends. Anyone she met was always invited and encouraged to come to the lake for a swim and a meal. There was always a spare bathing suit available and a freezer full of ice cream.

Judy was a member of the Amherst Women’s Club where she was honored with a life time membership after 50 continuous years as a member, a member of the International Wives Club where she took joy helping new arrivals acclimate to life in Amherst, a member of The League of Women Voters and a member of the Appalachian Mountain Club, always enjoying an adventurous hike.

Throughout her life Judy always was thinking of others first, never wanting the focus on herself. Her later years were spent lovingly being cared for by her husband, children, grandchildren and her most recent caregivers Cynthia, Becky, Sharon and Sarah. A special thank you to the Hospice of the Fisher Home team for their support and guidance.

She is survived by her husband Richard Stein, her children Anne Stein and husband Monty Kroopkin of San Diego, Carol Avonti and husband Steve of West Springfield, Lisa Lesure and husband Walter of Amherst and son-in-law Darrel Rost of Pittsfield, six grandchildren: Faith Stein, Kay Parsons, Rick Avonti, Mariah Lesure, Kayla Lesure and Taylor Lesure, 4 great grandchildren, many nieces and nephews, and her beloved sister-in law Lucy Townsend who became a true sister and friend. She joins her late brothers Peter Balise, John Balise and David Balise and her late daughter Linda Rost.

Her remains have been donated to the University of Massachusetts Medical School. A memorial service will occur this summer. Gifts in her memory may be donated to Hospice of the Fisher Home in Amherst.

Janice R. Brown ’43


Janice Rae Brown, 92, died on May 13, 2019, at Day Brook Village in Holyoke, Massachusetts.

Janice was born in Northampton on May 31, 1926, to the late Lorimer Hamilton and Pearle (Farnham) Brown. She was the sister of Roger Hamilton Brown, U.S.N. Lt. Com., and Frances Joy Brown, R.N., both deceased.

Janice Brown graduated from the former Northampton School for Girls, and later from Smith College earning both a B.A. and later with an M.Ed.

Her teaching years included positions in West Hartford, CT, and Northampton. She was a member of the former First Baptist Church.

All services will be private with burial in the Farnham family lot at Lakeview Cemetery in Shoreham, VT.

Karen McKenzie Anderson ’54

Karen McKenzie Anderson of Wernersville, PA, passed away peacefully in her home with her family present on February 25, 2019, at the age of 82 after a brief illness. She was predeceased by her husband of 45 years. Born on September 6, 1936, Karen was the only child of Kenneth W. McKenzie and Elizabeth “Betty” McKenzie. She grew up in Essex, Connecticut and graduated from the University of Vermont in 1958. That same year, she married David C. Anderson after his graduation from the United States Naval Academy. During David’s military service, the family moved frequently and lived overseas. They settled in West Hartford and Farmington, Connecticut, while David practiced law in Hartford for over 30 years.Karen enjoyed being a part of Phoebe Berks Village for 10 years where she met many new friends and served in several volunteer roles. She was an active member of the Friends Wernersville Public Library. Karen loved birdwatching and travel. She is survived by her three daughters and by seven grandchildren: Celia Anderson Davis (Paul E. Davis) of Parkton, Maryland and their children Samuel and Dorothy (Dee Dee); Jane Anderson Price (Stephen H. Price) of Wernersville and their children Morgan, Emma and Gwyn; and Deborah C. Stevens (Michael F. Stevens) of Niles, Michigan and their children Luke and Caleb.A private graveside service at the Mountain View Cemetery in Bloomfield, Connecticut, is planned for a future date. Lamm & Witman Funeral Home, Inc., 243 W. Penn Ave., Wernersville, is handling arrangements. In lieu of flowers, donations in Karen’s memory may be directed to Wernersville Public Library or to a charity of the donor’s choice.