Tag Archives: Northampton School for Girls

Lois Schubach Meyers ’53

Lois Meyers, 82, passed away Saturday, Aug. 10, 2019 at Avalon Heath Care Center at StoneRidge in Mystic, Connecticut.

She was predeceased by her husband of 54 years, Theodore Meyers, in 2012. Lois is survived by her daughter, Toby Flanagan and her husband, Kevin Flanagan; three grandchildren, Patrick Flanagan and his wife, Kerri Flanagan, of Waterford, Timothy Flanagan of Key West Fla., and Katelyn Livingston and her husband, Grant Livingston of Waterford. She also leaves two great-grandchildren, Thomas and Trey Flanagan of Waterford.

Born in Northampton, Mass. Nov. 11, 1936, Lois was the daughter of the late Julia and George Schubach of Easthampton, Mass. Lois graduated from Northampton School for Girls, Westfield State College, and then went on to earn a master’s degree from Springfield College. She taught music in Agawam, Northampton, and Boylston, Mass. She then relocated to Connecticut, where she taught in Waterford and Ledyard, and was named Teacher of the Year in 1989. Her full-time teaching career spanned 37 years. Lois was also an adjunct professor at Sacred Heart University where she developed a Multicultural and Human Diversity curriculum.

After retiring to Key West, Fla., she continued to teach music at Mary Immaculate Star of the Sea and at Wesley House Early Childhood Center. Lois was also the choir director of Metropolitan Community Church and was an active member of Literacy Volunteers of America in Monroe County, Fla. where she served as board president for many years.

Since moving back to Conn. in 2016, Lois continued with her love for music and teaching and started a Chimes Choir in which many residents of StoneRidge participated.

Throughout her life, Lois enjoyed entertaining friends and family, was an avid traveler, and a lifelong learner.

The family wishes to thank the entire StoneRidge Community and staff, including Top Sail and Avalon Health Care Center for their support and kindness over the past few years.

A Celebration of Life for family and friends will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14 in the Chart Room at StoneRidge at 186 Jerry Browne Rd, Mystic, CT.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Lois’ memory to the StoneRidge Scholarship Fund, 186 Jerry Browne Rd. Mystic, CT 06355.

Phyllis Seybolt, Former Faculty


Phyllis Seybolt of Boynton Beach, Florida and Gouldsboro, Maine passed away on Saturday, July 13, 2019.

Born on December 7, 1923 in Holyoke, Massachusetts to Willard and Helen Allen, Phyllis graduated from Holyoke High School and entered Penn State. Her college career was put on hold during WWII due to the need for women in the war industries. She worked on airplane production during the war years and then focused on raising her five children. Her husband, James L Beekman II, a career officer in the U.S. Air Force, was stationed in post war Europe where they resided in Chateau-Roux, France. James premature illness and death left her as sole support of her children, a challenge she surmounted by returning to college at University of Massachusetts, Amherst where she earned a Master’s degree in mathematics and initiated a long career in teaching high school algebra and calculus. She initially taught at the Northampton School for Girls and acted as director of admissions. Later she accepted a position at the Williston Academy in Easthampton, MA where she met her husband and life partner, Dr. Stephen Seybolt. Steve’s degree in English literature and Phyllis’ passion for math enriched the lives of generations of high school students.

Phyllis is survived by: her sister Marjorie Yount of North Carolina, her husband Stephen of Boynton Beach, FL, as well as all children: Candace and her husband William Matthew of Hopkington, MA, Dr. Robert Beekman and his wife Ellen of Ellsworth, ME, James Beekman of Portland, OR, Allen Beekman and his wife Sandy of Bend, OR, Laurie and her husband Dana Parker of Plymouth, MA. She is survived by grandchildren: Aria Baker, Brian, Benjamin and Samuel Beekman all of Bend, OR, Julie Matthew of East Greenwich, RI, Allison Miseph of Indianapolis, IN, Michael Miseph of Holyoke, MA, Kimberly Kleinpeter of Gorham, ME, and Andrew Beekman of Boone, NC. She is also survived by 7 great grandchildren: Kiley Shea, Jaya Belle, Jackson Tye, Natalie Kate, Robert Reynolds, Hickson Rudder and George Porter.

Phyllis overcame many challenges in her life, but none so great as her final battle with Alzheimer’s disease. A woman proud of her intellectual gifts, she bore progressive losses with grace and dignity. She taught us all to appreciate the smaller pleasures in life and took great joy in the love and companionship of family and friends.

In lieu of flowers, friends are invited to consider a gift in her memory to the Parkside Inn (Memory Care Center), 1613 SW 3rd St, Boynton Beach, FL. 33435.

Corinne Rogers Honkalehto ’46


Corinne Rogers Honkalehto, of Hamilton, NY – beloved mother and friend, dedicated swimmer, reader, gardener, and crossword aficionado – died peacefully in her sleep on March 29, 2018, at her daughter’s home in Boise, Idaho, after several months battling heart failure and vascular disease. She was 89.
Corinne was born to Virginia Thompson Rogers and Reginald B. Rogers on March 9, 1929, in Manhasset, NY, and grew up in the Long Island town of Huntington. She and her sister Judy attended Adelphi Academy in Brooklyn, NY, while their mother attended library school at Pratt Institute. Later the family moved to Northampton, MA, when her mother became Head of Circulation for Nielson Library at Smith College. Corinne graduated from Smith in 1950 with an A.B. in Sociology and later earned a Masters in Library Science from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn.
Corinne’s professional librarian positions included school, business and academic settings. While working as a reserves librarian at MIT in Cambridge, MA, she met a handsome Finn from Quincy, MA, Oswald Honkalehto, who was pursuing a Ph.D. in Economics. They married in 1953 and lived in Brookline, MA, and also in Princeton, NJ, while Ozzie worked at Princeton University. In 1957, they moved to Pittsburgh, PA, (Carnegie Mellon) where their daughter, Taina, was born, and next to East Lansing, MI, (Michigan State) where their 2nd daughter, Liisa, was born.
In 1962, Ozzie was recruited to teach Economics at Colgate University in Hamilton, NY, where they settled as part of a cohort of young faculty who arrived in the 1960s – most of whom raised families and stayed in Hamilton for many years. Corinne worked as full-time mom, then on and off in the Colgate Language Lab, as a substitute librarian at Hamilton Central School, and as librarian at the American Management Association. She also served on the board of the Hamilton Public Library.
The family enjoyed playing tennis, spending summers at Colgate Camp, Old Forge, and Speculator, NY, with close family friends, and visits with relatives and friends on Cape Cod. Corinne and their daughters also accompanied Ozzie to England over several fall semesters with the Colgate London Economics study group. Later, after he retired the two of them enjoyed many trips to New York City, to Europe and elsewhere with the MIT Alumni Association, and on South American and south Pacific voyages aboard the Queen Mary II.
Corinne was active in the women’s Hamilton Fortnightly Club, and she loved swimming almost anywhere, especially in the ocean or with friends at the Colgate pool. In addition to tennis and swimming, she played guitar and sang, and later took up the piano. She enjoyed dancing, reading books, traveling, and became a master at Sunday New York Times crossword puzzles.
Corinne was thoughtful, kind, and patient, and delighted in experiencing both the quiet outdoor beauty around her in Hamilton and the culture of world cities. She maintained strong friendships with long-time friends, and welcomed new friends from her travels with ease. Her last years were spent enjoying reading, movies and art in Hamilton, Manhattan, Boise and Seattle with her daughters and their friends. She had a knack for remembering little jokes and rhymes, and she shared them with family, friends and caregivers into her last days.
Corinne was preceded in death by her husband, Oswald, in 2013, and sister, Judith Rogers Atwood ’45, of Kingston, RI, in 2001. She is survived by her daughters, Taina Honkalehto (Ed Melvin), of Seattle, WA, and Liisa Rogers, of Boise, ID, and two nieces.
The family wishes to thank Treasure Valley Hospice of Nampa, ID, for their expert care and services during her last weeks.
A remembrance gathering for Corinne will be held in Hamilton in late spring or early summer 2018.
In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Colgate University Lineberry Natatorium, Colgate University Gift Records, 13 Oak Drive, Hamilton, NY 13346.

Barbara Santaniello Brown ’64

Barbara Jean (Sanders) Brown, age 72, went to be with the Lord on June 25, 2019 after a long battle with Parkinson’s disease. She was born in Springfield, Massachusetts on July 28, 1946. She was a graduate of Williston Northampton School and Elmira College. After college, she married the love of her life, James H. Brown with whom she lived a blessed and glorious life for 50 years. She was a member of First Presbyterian Church in Knoxville, Knoxville Christian Women’s Connection, Knoxville Symphony League, and a lifetime member of Presbyterian Women. She was involved in many organizations in Knoxville as well as in Erie, Pennsylvania.

Barbara is preceded in death by her parents, Jean Atkinson and Donald Santaniello.

She is survived by her husband, James H. Brown, her sister Carol Kelley ’66, both of Knoxville, her brother, Joseph Santaniello and wife Angela of Massachusetts, nephew, Jim Lepine and wife Jennifer of Cummings, GA, niece, Jackie Delorm and husband Rob of East Berne, New York, sister-in-law, Jeanie Belhobek and husband George of Pepper Pike, OH, 2 great nephews and 1 great niece, Goddaughter Shelby Brooks and husband Tracy, special friend and caregiver, Alisa Jones and husband Chris, all of Knoxville. She will be greatly missed by many.

A celebration of life will be held on Saturday, June 29 at 2:00 pm at First Presbyterian Church at 620 State St., Knoxville, TN 37902. Barbara’s family will receive friends following the service. In lieu of flowers, memorials in Barbara’s name may be made to First Presbyterian Church.

Barbara Seabury Engel ’48

Barbara “Bobi” Seabury Engel, age 89, passed away April 12, 2019 in Naples, Florida. Bobi was born on February 9, 1930 in Springfield, MA. She was the daughter of Raymond M. Seabury of Longmeadow, MA and Laura Barker of Newport, RI. Bobi was predeceased by her sister Margaret (Seabury) Lyman, her brother Raymond Seabury, Jr., her daughter Cynthia Engel and her grandson, Joshua Sasen. Bobi is survived by her husband, Dr. N. Eugene “Gene” Engel. She is also survived by her sons Phillip Johnson of Salem, MA, David Engel of Easley, South Carolina, Donald Engel and his wife Donna of Naples, FL; her daughters Laura Lovell and her husband Ross of East Haddam, CT, Christine Sasen of Springfield, Carolyn Brennan and her husband Thomas of Wilbraham and Zandra Engel of Agawam, MA; ten grandchildren, and several great-grandchildren. Bobi grew up in Longmeadow. She was a resident of Wilbraham and Brewster before moving to Naples, FL in 1995. Bobi attended the Northampton School for Girls and the House in the Pines Junior College majoring in Art History. Bobi was a former member of the Junior League of Springfield, the Dennis Yacht Club of E. Dennis and the League Club of Naples. Bobi served as the Director of Youth Programs for both the Wilbraham United Church and the Dennis Yacht Club. Bobi was a proud member of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She was an avid bridge player, loved to dance, athlete, painter, craft lady, dramatist and had her most fun as a puppeteer. Bobi and her husband Gene were blessed to travel throughout the world after retirement. A Memorial Service will be held at 11:00 a.m. on June 20th at Bethlehem Church, 123 Allen St., Hampden, MA. There will be a private burial service. Memorial donations in Bobi’s name may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 225 N. Michigan Ave., Fl. 17, Chicago, IL 60601 or at www.alz.org

Margaret Moore Eckman ’45


Margaret Moore Eckman, 91, died on January 18, 2018 at her home in Bremen, Maine. She was born in Chester, Connecticut on January 1, 1927, the last of five children to Ernst D. and Elsie (Warner) Moore. She is survived by her husband of 65 years, Roland Eckman; two sons, Andrew and John; five grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. There will be no service, and burial will be private.

Margaret Ould Bell Craig ’36


Mrs. Margaret Ould Bell Craig, died April 24, 2019 in Middletown R.I. at the age of 99. She graduated from Northampton School for Girls in 1936, and from Wellesley College in 1940. After raising four daughters with her husband Frederick E. Craig in N.J. they enjoyed many happy retirement years in Rhode Island near the ocean. She is survived by four daughters, three grandchildren, and 3 great grandchildren.

Claire Neiley Moss ’46

Claire Neiley Moss was born in Binghamton, New York in 1928. She began her education in the Endicott Public Schools, later attending Northampton School for Girls, Skidmore College, Boston State Teacher’s College, and Harvard University. A resident of Cambridge, Massachusetts for more than sixty-five years, she was active in schools, church, and community affairs. During the 1960’s, Claire was the first director of the Roxbury-Belmont Summer Program, a summer school that preceded the formal integration of the Boston and area public schools. Claire taught in Westwood and later in Belmont for thirty-one years. Upon retirement, she was a field supervisor for education students at Harvard University. Claire also worked with Amnesty International in London and with The Tuesday Meals Program at First Parish Unitarian Universalist Church in Harvard Square. In 1983 she married Van Wood. They traveled and enjoyed life together for many years. She loved the arts and was herself artistic. Her family, her students, and her friends will remember Claire for her kindness, her devotion to social justice, her passion for both teaching and learning, and her love of life. She met life challenges by always working toward good possibilities ahead. Claire was pre-deceased by her husband Van (2007) and by her three brothers Dick (1988), Bob (2011) and Chick (2015). She is survived by her two daughters Molly Moss (David) and Kate Moss Manski (Chuck), as well as her four grandchildren including Ben Manski (Sarah), Becca Manski, Anna Rosenbluth (Paul), and Peter Rosenbluth (Milvi), and by six great-grandchildren: Alex, Hannah, Aivi, Lev, Miku, and Isaac. If you wish to make donations in honor of Claire, please consider The Tuesday Meals Program at First Parish Unitarian Universalist Church in Cambridge, Amnesty International, or Planned Parenthood. Claire worked all her life for a better world. A memorial for family and close friends will be scheduled at a later time.

Ellen von Hofen Beckman ’42


Ellen Beckman, a longtime resident of Kirkwood, Missouri, beloved wife of the late Robert Page Beckman, died in peace in Glen Carbon, Illinois, Thursday, Nov. 27, 2018.

Born Jan. 21, 1924, in Cranford, New Jersey, Ellen resided in Massachusetts most of her young adult life. She graduated from Smith College in 1947 and completed her M.A. degree in 1967 from University of Missouri. Ellen worked as assistant librarian at Kirkwood High School from 1970 to 1980.

Ellen loved to read, learn and travel. She is survived by three children, Ericka Beckman (Richard) Baim, Alan (Jenny) Beckman and Keith (Gloria) Beckman, and two granddaughters, Lindsay A. and Sarah J. Beckman.

Maria Burgee Dwight LeVesconte ’52

By day, a barefooted Mimi Dwight sang along to Joni Mitchell as she drove a station wagon full of her five children and a shedding Saint Bernard around the streets of Holyoke, Massachusetts. In the evenings, she met in back rooms to organize for social justice in her community and beyond.

Born and raised in Holyoke, she was the youngest daughter of Henry and Marcelle Burgee. Her adolescence at the Northampton School for Girls earned the comment on her report card that “Mimi is a good student, but she seems inordinately interested in boys.” They were interested back.

At Bryn Mawr College in the early 1950s, she joined her first protest march. Her zeal for social justice led her inadvertently to the field of gerontology, which became her passion and profession.

In Massachusetts she was known as Mimi Dwight. Under that name, she co-founded the Urban Ministries (a multi-faith coalition dedicated to participatory government within the inner city of Holyoke); she served on the Commission on the Status of Women, the State Welfare Commission, and the Housing Finance Agency, among others. In the early 1970s, she braved local and state politics to create the nation’s first municipal Geriatric Authority, spearheading the successful effort to turn an outdated Municipal Home into a groundbreaking geriatric rehabilitation center. The building was later named in her honor.

Propelled by her interest in the challenges she saw in the field of aging, she enrolled at Hampshire College to finish the bachelor’s degree she had postponed in favor of marriage and children. When she learned that Hampshire would not accept any credits from her two years at Bryn Mawr, she resolutely set out to complete her Hampshire degree in one year.

After graduating, she loaded her two youngest into a quirky car and drove cross-country to get a master’s degree in Gerontology from the University of Southern California. In Los Angeles she became Maria Dwight, a single mother raising two boys and beginning a career that would see her rise to become a world-renowned visionary in the field of aging.

She joined Gerontological Planning Associates as vice president in 1975 and in 1982 formed her own company, Gerontological Services Inc. GSI became a national advocate for participatory planning for services and facilities for older adults. Focusing on primary data collected directly from older people, GSI developed operational, design and marketing plans for innovative approaches for its clients, who included LGBTQ, Born Deaf, Chinese-American, Japanese American, Native American, Religious Women, expatriates in Mexico and Costa Rica, faith based long term care and housing providers, hospitals, developers, architects, cities, towns, day centers, CCRCs and moderate-income housing projects.

Among achievements too numerous to list, she served on the Board of Overseers of Brandeis University, on the Boards of Centura Health System (Denver), Stonewall Communities (Boston), Wise and Healthy Aging (Los Angeles), the Williston Northampton School and, most recently, Friends House in Santa Rosa, CA.

For 30 years, Maria taught at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design’s summer session; she presented at Harvard’s Schools of Medicine and Public Health; at MIT, UMass, Boston University School of Medicine; at California University of San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego and Irvine; and her alma mater, the USC School of Gerontology. She testified before the United States House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor and the United States Senate Committee on Housing and Urban Affairs.

She was a frequent speaker at international conferences including AHSA Asian Conference India, Asian Health Conference Singapore, International Association of Homes and Services for the Aging Conferences, as well as “Quo Vadis” in Berlin. Maria was appointed to the White House Conference on Aging, National Advisory Committee in 1981 and also served it as a delegate, advocating for the integration of housing and services. Her work was recognized with countless awards, culminating in the “Continuing Care Hall of Fame Lifetime Achievement Award” in 2017.

She was an intrepid traveler who migrated with the reindeer in the Arctic and marched with the penguins in the Antarctic (as well as lots of warm and exotic places in between).

Maria’s small rented bungalow in Santa Monica was never empty. She fed and mothered a vast extended family of skate rats, actors, hard-core musicians, activists, surfers, students, co-workers, artists and writers, as well as her own brood. She was equally comfortable with Senators, Governors and CEOs as with members of the Flesh Eaters, Dream Syndicate and Sonic Youth. And she was admired and adored by them all.

Maria leaves four children: Bill Dwight (Lida Lewis) of Northampton, Lili Dwight (Byron Coley) of Deerfield, Valle Dwight (Phil O’Donoghue) of Florence, and Ryan Dwight of Huntington Beach, California, as well as eight grandchildren: Eli Dwight, Hudson and Addison Coley, Tim and Aidan O’Donoghue, and Ella, Liam and Dylan Dwight. She is also survived by her sister, Paula Gallup ’49 (John Gallup), of Longmeadow, as well as many nieces and nephews. Her husband, Edward LeVesconte; and her son, Timothy Monk Dwight, pre-deceased her.

The family is planning memorial services for later this summer; one at her home in the redwoods of Northern California, and the second in her childhood haunts of western Massachusetts.

Donations in her honor may be made to Whole Children, 41 Russell St, Hadley, MA 01035; www.wholechildren.org.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that you elect a woman President in 2020.

Read more about Maria in the Spring 2016 issue of the Bulletin.