Tag Archives: Williston Academy

Stephen A. Trudel ’69

Stephen Allard Trudel, age 69, passed away peacefully on August 6, 2019.

He was born on May 1, 1950 in North Adams. He grew up in Williamstown, MA and Glens Falls, NY and attended Glens Falls High School, Williston Academy and the University of Massachusetts.

Steve was beloved by so many people because he was a man of enormous compassion, kindness, humor and wisdom. Everyone with whom he was a friend felt his caring and his love energy. Early in his career he shared his love with young children as a day care provider.

Steve was among the first men to recognize working with men acting abusively was essential to curb domestic violence. In the early 1980s he went to San Francisco to learn how the Men Overcoming Violence (MOVE) program ran its batterer intervention groups. He brought back a vision of believing men could change. In addition to conducting the initial interviews with many of the men entering the program, Steve worked in virtually every court hearing domestic abuse cases in western Mass., and was the first point of contact for men mandated to attend a 40- week batterer intervention group. Steve led groups continuously for nearly 30 years. It is estimated he worked with more than a thousand men and held nearly every position in the Men’s Resource Center’s batterer’s program, Moving Forward.

Near the end of his career, Steve served as the liaison for the female partners or ex-partners of men in the program, a position heretofore exclusively held by a woman. That these women had no issue with a man being their contact speaks volumes about Steve’s capacity to gain these women’s trust. He set the standard for men as allies to women survivors.

When there was something that Steve cared about he invested himself fully in its cultivation. This was literally true about one of his most fervent passions – his extraordinarily diverse and exquisite garden in which Steve spent so many hours and delighted in giving tours to friends.

He became a plant expert through his endless pursuit of making the garden ever more inviting. The same passion was evident in his eclectic love for music, which flowed dependably throughout his home. He especially loved to sing and was part of not one but two a cappella groups where his beautiful voice and enormous repertoire of songs were most appreciated.

Cooking was another endeavor that absorbed and gratified Steve. Many of his signature dishes enriched holiday dinners at the homes of his chosen families. His scones were the stuff of legends and he could be counted on to bring a memorable dish to any potluck.

Steve recently celebrated the 50th anniversary of his graduation from Williston where he sang in the Caterwaulers, performed in plays and ran cross country. He was on the reunion committee and was very pleased to see friends from his class for whom he was both an inspiration and a driving force through the years. Steve loved looking good and he had an impeccable eye for clothing. Men and women consulted him about their outfits, because his taste was so dependably on the money. His style was uniquely his own and fit every occasion. Folks looked forward to how Steve would dress at many events.

But notwithstanding all of these loves, Steve reserved the greatest part of his enormous heart for his friendships, which were the centerpiece of his life. He nurtured each one with the same tenderness, devotion and integrity with which he bestowed his caring upon every plant in his garden. Not only did he forge deep and abiding connections to so many women and men, but he invariably reached out to the children of his friends and they became his friends as well. The outpouring of love, of the litany of ways in which Steve touched so many of his chosen families is remarkable on so many levels. The outpouring of loving emails he received while in the hospital are yet one more testimony to the essential role he played in his many friendships.

One of the most consistent and outstanding relationships Steve helped to sustain is his men’s group, which will celebrate its 41 st year offering support to one another this fall. Steve was a major driving force in having the group be so significant and long-lasting. His contributions to our celebrative monthly dinners, his belief in honesty and the trust he gave and received were hallmarks of the group throughout its tenure.

Steve will be missed beyond the power of words to express by his family of origin and all of his chosen families. His gifts of unwavering caring, concern and devotion will long be remembered by generations of people whose lives he touched and for whom he had an indelible impact. He leaves behind his siblings, Lyn Trudel of Palm Coast, Florida, Sam Trudel and his partner Liz Winn of Middlebury, Vermont, Susan Marton of Martinsville, New Jersey and David Trudel of Glens Falls, NY. He also is survived by his cousin, Rachel Branch, of N. Adams, MA. He was beloved by his nieces and nephews including, Jason, Joseph and Alexis Cenami, Alyssa and Ryan Trudel, Jeremy, Emily, Samuel and Philip Marton, and Timothy Trudel and Larra Wallace. In addition there are a great many friends who will miss him forever.

There will be a CELEBRATION OF LIFE on Saturday, September 21 st .

Phyllis Seybolt, Former Faculty


Phyllis Seybolt of Boynton Beach, Florida and Gouldsboro, Maine passed away on Saturday, July 13, 2019.

Born on December 7, 1923 in Holyoke, Massachusetts to Willard and Helen Allen, Phyllis graduated from Holyoke High School and entered Penn State. Her college career was put on hold during WWII due to the need for women in the war industries. She worked on airplane production during the war years and then focused on raising her five children. Her husband, James L Beekman II, a career officer in the U.S. Air Force, was stationed in post war Europe where they resided in Chateau-Roux, France. James premature illness and death left her as sole support of her children, a challenge she surmounted by returning to college at University of Massachusetts, Amherst where she earned a Master’s degree in mathematics and initiated a long career in teaching high school algebra and calculus. She initially taught at the Northampton School for Girls and acted as director of admissions. Later she accepted a position at the Williston Academy in Easthampton, MA where she met her husband and life partner, Dr. Stephen Seybolt. Steve’s degree in English literature and Phyllis’ passion for math enriched the lives of generations of high school students.

Phyllis is survived by: her sister Marjorie Yount of North Carolina, her husband Stephen of Boynton Beach, FL, as well as all children: Candace and her husband William Matthew of Hopkington, MA, Dr. Robert Beekman and his wife Ellen of Ellsworth, ME, James Beekman of Portland, OR, Allen Beekman and his wife Sandy of Bend, OR, Laurie and her husband Dana Parker of Plymouth, MA. She is survived by grandchildren: Aria Baker, Brian, Benjamin and Samuel Beekman all of Bend, OR, Julie Matthew of East Greenwich, RI, Allison Miseph of Indianapolis, IN, Michael Miseph of Holyoke, MA, Kimberly Kleinpeter of Gorham, ME, and Andrew Beekman of Boone, NC. She is also survived by 7 great grandchildren: Kiley Shea, Jaya Belle, Jackson Tye, Natalie Kate, Robert Reynolds, Hickson Rudder and George Porter.

Phyllis overcame many challenges in her life, but none so great as her final battle with Alzheimer’s disease. A woman proud of her intellectual gifts, she bore progressive losses with grace and dignity. She taught us all to appreciate the smaller pleasures in life and took great joy in the love and companionship of family and friends.

In lieu of flowers, friends are invited to consider a gift in her memory to the Parkside Inn (Memory Care Center), 1613 SW 3rd St, Boynton Beach, FL. 33435.

Burton J. Landau ’50


Burton J. Landau, microbiologist, medical educator and Associate Dean at Drexel University; loving husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather, died in his home on October 23, 2018. He is survived by his wife of 61 years, Ellen Segal Landau, his sons Jim (Lesly) Landau and Richard (Hiromi) Landau, his sister Lois Landau Berman and his brother Peter (Roberta) Landau and his brother in-law William (Joanne) Segal. He was the cherished grandfather of Emily (Jared), Jessica, Andrew (Jennine), Katherine, Joey and his great-grandson Gavin, all of whom will miss his many stories and words of wisdom and love. Family and friends are invited to a Memorial Service, Monday, October 29, 3:00 PM, at Joseph Levine & Sons Memorial Chapel, 4737 Street Road, Trevose, PA. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the American Cancer Society in Burton’s memory (www.cancer.org).

 

Thomas H. LaBelle ’53

Thomas H. LaBelle, 95, of Easthampton passed away peacefully surrounded by his family July 2, 2019 at the Elaine Manor in Hadley. He was born in Holyoke, April 2, 1924, the son of the late Henry and Marie (Tagliolato) LaBelle. Tom was educated in the Easthampton schools and was a graduate of the Williston Academy. He was a WWII US Army Air Corp Veteran serving as Radio Operator. Tom owned and operated The Camera Shop as well as Jessie’s Taxi Co., both in Easthampton, for many years. Additionally, he was a self-employed freelance photographer working independently and contributing to the Daily Hampshire Gazette. He was a member of the Easthampton Lions Club, the Easthampton Chamber of Commerce and sang with a local Barber Shop Quartet. Thomas was a scratch golfer belonging to many local country clubs and had eight holes-in-one to his credit. Tom’s beloved wife for 54 years June (Ladnier) LaBelle passed away in 1999. He leaves his daughters, Sandy M. Colpack (Jim) and June “Jill” Prosciak, both of Easthampton, and Barbara “Bonnie” Johnson (Cliff) of Southampton, his 6 Grandsons Thomas, Jarrett, Heath, Michael, Kyle, and Chris, his 8 Great Grandchildren, his sister Shirley Slavas of Belchertown, and his many nieces and nephews. Tom was predeceased by his daughter Janice LaBelle and his son-in-law John Prosciak. Funeral services will be private, the O’Brien Funeral Home has been entrusted with all arrangements. Memorial gifts can be made to Riverside Industry 1 Cottage St. Easthampton, MA 01027 or to the Hospice of the Fisher Home 1165 North Pleasant St. Amherst, MA 01002.

Howard H. Tiley ’49


Howard H.“Bub” Tiley, 89, of New Smyrna Beach, FL, formerly of Williamsburg, MA, passed away Friday, April 5, 2019. Mr. Tiley was born on March 26, 1930 in Williamsburg, MA, the son of the late Charles and Ethel (Harlow) Tiley. He was a professional golfer, the owner of the Jolly Bull and the founder of Bub’s Bar B Que both in MA. He was an avid fisherman and a loyal fan of the Boston Red Sox.
Mr. Tiley was predeceased by his wife, Norinne (Jacobus) Tiley and is survived by his children; daughter, Patricia McAnaugh (John), son, Deac Tiley (Elaine), daughter, Mary Jo Lundquist (Michael), daughter, Susan Flynn (James) and daughter, Carolyn Tiley. He is also survived by his four grandchildren; Tara, Kristen, Ashley and Miles, seven great-grandchildren and one great, great-grandson.
A Graveside Service was held April 12, 2019 at Daytona Memorial Park, Daytona Beach, FL.
A memorial service for Mr. Tiley will be conducted in Massachusetts at a later date. Online memories and condolences may be made at lohmanfuneralhomes.com

Memorial Contributions may be made in memory of Howard H. Tiley, to the Halifax Health Hospice, 3800 Woodbriar Trail, Port Orange, FL 23129

Walter Burrichter ’60


Walter Burrichter, 76, of Homestead, Florida, passed away unexpectedly Sunday, May 19, 2019. The son of August and Osa Burrichter, he was born August 28, 1942. Except for the years he spent away at school, Walter was a lifelong resident of Florida. He graduated high school from Williston Academy, Easthampton, Massachusetts, and went on to Purdue University where he graduated with a degree in plant sciences. Walter is survived by his twin sister, Metta Price; older sister, Minna Cornelisse; and younger brother, August ’62. Walter started farming with his father in 1964 and continued through the mid 1980’s. He was currently employed by the Florida Department of Agriculture as a fruit and vegetable inspector. Walter’s true love was fishing and snorkeling in the Florida Keys. In addition, he fished the Big Island of Hawaii, the Bay of Islands in New Zealand, Panama and the Yucatan Peninsula. Walter’s dedication to his profession and his love of life and all it’s challenges were the foundation of his character. May he rest in peace. A celebration of life will be held at a later date for family and close friends.

Irwin Kelman Cohen ’53

Irwin Kelman “Kel” Cohen, M.D., died on June 9, 2019, in Richmond, Virginia, at the age of 84. He passed away peacefully at his home with his wife at his side. Kel held confidently to his belief that life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but rather that one ought to skid in sideways, with the body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and while screaming “Wow – what a ride!” Kel is survived by his wife, Gayle Williams; his children, David (Candace) Cohen of Madison, Wisconsin and Nancy (Mike) Kotz of Kensington, Maryland; and his grandchildren Hunter, Lowell, Anna and Hannah. He is also survived by his wife’s daughter, Alison (Carl) Meadows and their children, Clara and Libby. He was preceded in death by his parents, Morris and Ida Kelman Cohen; and his brother, William Cohen. Kel was born March 30, 1935, in Troy, New York. He grew up in Massachusetts and on the shores of Lake Winnisquam in New Hampshire, where his lifelong love for the Boston Red Sox was sparked. After graduating from Williston Academy in Massachusetts, he went on to his beloved Kenyon College and then graduated from Columbia University. He earned his M.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill School of Medicine. Kel continued his training at Dartmouth, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and the National Institutes of Health, after which he realized he wanted to pursue an academic career because of the influence of his mentors at Kenyon and UNC. Kel came to Richmond in 1972 to the then Medical College of Virginia, now the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System and founded the Plastic Surgery program as well as the first Wound Healing Laboratory for research in the United States. His many years at MCV were a source of great fulfillment and satisfaction. He continued to support the university and its programs in any way he could long after retirement. As an educator, Kel served on the Board of Plastic Surgery and was an editor of its journal. He founded the Wound Healing Society, served as its president and was the founding president of the Wound Healing Foundation. He lectured on wound healing and plastic surgery throughout the world, published over 125 papers and edited a definitive textbook on wound healing. His awards include Physician of the Year by the Richmond Maimonides Society and Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Wound Healing Society, The Society for the Advancement of Wound Care and the World Union of Wound Healing Societies. Prior to his death, he spearheaded the organization of the Wound Healing Coalition to give wound healing its proper place in medical science and its deserved recognition with the NIH, FDA, United States Congress, CMS and the public. Kel loved the residents and students he guided and felt a deep satisfaction in the good work they did in health care, knowing that his influence made a difference. He was loved in return by them and also by his countless patients, whom he always treated with respect, kindness and genuine caring, for his hope was to make a meaningful difference in their lives. Despite the rigorous demands of his career, Kel still found time to embrace life with zest and zeal, often while enjoying a memorable meal accompanied by a fine wine. He loved music, photography and cooking, and traveling the globe. He was a lifelong learner with curiosity about everything. He was a true blue Carolina Tar Heel fan. Kel embraced a wide circle of friends from many different occupations, countries, languages and backgrounds and he enjoyed keeping in frequent touch with all of them. Still, far above his career was his family and although at times work kept him from them, he agonized when it did. The accomplishments of which he was most proud are his children and grandchildren. Kel believed strongly that life was eternal because his children and grandchildren carried his DNA and he would always live through his offspring. To Kel, his children and grandchildren made him immortal and death would never be the victor. He loved the line from the poet E.E. Cummings, “How do you like your blue-eyed boy Mister Death?” A Celebration of Life will take place at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to a charity of one’s choice.

W. Kirkland Taylor ’53


Westervelt Kirkland (“Kirk”) Taylor passed away on May 7, 2019 at Swedish Medical Hospital in Seattle, Washington. He was 85 years old. A Seattle resident since the mid-1970’s, Kirk came to Seattle from New York to pursue his career as a civil rights and criminal defense attorney. Admitted to practice in Washington in 1977, Kirk joined the Seattle Public Defender office and soon became a senior attorney supervising and mentoring up-and-coming public defense attorneys. Thereafter, Kirk went on to practice privately handling criminal and civil rights cases as well as assignments in intellectual property, real estate and business law matters. Kirk’s nearly 50 years in the legal field began with his engineering expertise and tenure as a patent examiner in the United States Patent Office, followed by his years working at IBM in Fishkill, New York. The New York State Attica Correctional Prison riot of 1971 marked a pivotal professional turning point for Kirk who had made the decision to shift focus to civil rights and criminal defense. His activism and defense work for inmates caught up in the Attica uprising reflected his passion to combine a zest for the law and legal training with a desire to fight for the rights of individuals, including those downtrodden, marginalized or however challenged by the justice system. While sparring with adversaries, Kirk’s unassuming demeanor masked his talent for negotiating and unrelenting spirit to win. And, guided by a humanitarian ethos, his approachable style resonated with many clients who have shared accolades and heartfelt thanks for his work. Kirk earned his Juris Doctor from American University’s Washington College of Law. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania’s Moore School of Electrical Engineering, he held a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering. Before college, Kirk graduated from The Williston Northampton School in Massachusetts. An outdoorsman, Kirk swapped leisure time spent on Martha’s Vineyard for a joyful life in the Pacific Northwest, often remarking on its beauty and sharing tales of his sailing, fishing, camping and hiking pursuits. He cherished his regular jogs along Lake Washington, workouts at the YMCA and quite a few other favorite pastimes, such as playing poker and chess with his inner circle of friends and colleagues. While his reading list was broad, Kirk was a devotee of the detective genre. And, his overseas travels to Southeast Asia, Brazil and Europe provided even more enchanting stories to tell. Forever an animal lover, Kirk always had a spirited canine companion at his side. Born in New York City on December 20, 1933, Kirk was raised in the St. Albans area of Queens, New York. His father, Westervelt A. Taylor, was a Queens County district attorney and MIT (class of 1927) and Fordham Law graduate, and mother, Zenaide Anderson Taylor, a teacher. A jazz music enthusiast, he recalled during his youth a home filled with music as Mom played piano and at times close St. Albans friends and neighbors, some of whom revered as jazz legends, would visit and join in. In a ceremony officiated by his uncle, the Reverend Jesse F. Anderson, Sr. of Philadelphia, Kirk married Dorothy H. Anderson in the spring of 1959 and is survived and will be missed greatly by their children Kevin, Karen and Todd Taylor. In 2015, Kirk married again and is survived by his wife of 4 years, Patricia Espey. Grandchildren, along with the rest of his family and friends, will remember him fondly as well.

Rodney C. Farnham ’56

Rodney C. “Rod” Farnham, 82, passed away Friday, April 26, 2019, after a long illness. He leaves his wife of 59 years, Phyllis (Underwood) Farnham; his son, James T. Farnham and his wife Linda of Ipswich; his daughter, Merideth J. Farnham of Orlando, Fla.; and his son, Stuart T. Farnham and his wife Julie of Colorado Springs, Colo. He is survived by seven grandchildren, Benjamin, Nathaniel, Elizabeth, Rachel, Hannah, Cole, and John Farnham; and one great-granddaughter, Halie. He is also survived by his sister-in-law and her husband, Grace and Bob Varney; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his brother, John R. Farnham. Rod was born and raised in Northampton, the son of the late F. Russell and Irene (May) Farnham. He spent his early years between Lake Dunmore, Vermont, and western Massachusetts. He attended Williston Academy and was an alumnus of the University of Massachusetts. He met his future wife, Phyllis, at UMass, marrying in 1959. They lived in Conn., Mass., and N.H., throughout their marriage, residing in Hingham for over thirty years. Rod was a retired Reinsurance Executive and was an avid golfer, gardener and cook. He and Phyllis loved to vacation in Vermont, Cape Cod, and Canada. No funeral services are currently scheduled. A private burial may occur at a later date. Donations in memory of Rod can be made to the Norwell Visiting Nurses Association and Hospice via the NVNA and Hospice Charitable Fund, 120 Longwater Drive, Norwell, MA 02061, 781-610-1409.

Jack D. Hathaway ’55


With sad but peaceful hearts we announce the death of Jack Dalton Hathaway. Jack passed away peacefully at home in Woodstown, New Jersey, early Tuesday morning, May 14, 2019 at age 83. Born January 11, 1936 to Harry and Edith Clark Dalton in Ware, Massachusetts, Jack’s biological father died at an early age and Jack was subsequently adopted by his stepfather Holland Marsh Hathaway, whom he always considered his father. Jack is survived by his wife of 59 years, Gertrude “Trudi” Huber Hathaway and their two sons, John Clark Hathaway (Judy) and Douglas Huber Hathaway (Nan) and their five grandchildren, Evan, Clark, Caroline, Elizabeth and Hillary. He is also survived by his brother Clark P. Hathaway (Linda). Jack grew up in Nahant, Massachusetts and Barrington, Rhode Island. He attended Barrington High School and Williston Academy, a boarding preparatory school in Easthampton, Massachusetts, where he lettered in soccer and basketball. In 1959 he graduated from Gettysburg College with a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and History. He earned a Master’s in Education from Shippensburg University in 1968. His athletic career in soccer and basketball followed him to Gettysburg College and in 2008, Jack was inducted into the Gettysburg College Hall of Athletic Honor. At Gettysburg Jack was a member of Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity. After college, Jack served in the Army and married his college sweetheart. He began his teaching and coaching careers in 1962 at Waynesboro High School in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. In 1968 his family moved to South Jersey where he accepted a position as teacher and head basketball coach at Pennsville Memorial High School. In 1980 Jack established the boys’ varsity soccer program at Pennsville High School and coached for many years. Jack truly loved teaching and coaching and made a difference in the lives of many of his students as evidenced by letters he often received years after they graduated. In 1984 he was named New Jersey Social Studies Teacher of the Year and in 1990 he was an exchange teacher to Russia with a program called “Hands Across the Water”. Community volunteerism was always a significant part of Jack’s life. When he moved to South Jersey, he became involved immediately with the Salem County YMCA, which allowed him to work with the youth in the Woodstown area. After his retirement in 1993 from public education he took on numerous volunteer positions. He was a board member of the American Red Cross for NJ – PA and for 18 years he coordinated the Woodstown Red Cross Blood Drive. He was a Salem County Habitat Board member and was President from 1999 – 2002; past chairperson of the Woodstown Historic Preservation Commission; a founding member of the Woodstown Beautification Committee and worked endlessly to secure funding for lampposts and flags in the Borough of Woodstown. Jack was a valued mentor in the Interfaith Council Tutoring Program for 18 years and was a dedicated volunteer for Meals on Wheels. In 2017 he was recognized for his decades of volunteer leadership by receiving the Woodstown Outstanding Citizen Award. Although he served on several boards and committees within the Woodstown Presbyterian Church, he always felt that his time as a Deacon was the most important. He went on three Mission Trips to Romania to help build a Christian Orphanage and numerous mission trips within the U.S. Jack loved spending time in Cape May with his family and friends. One of his favorite pastimes was gathering twice a month with his Hearts group always with a goal of “shooting the moon”. An extra special pastime of Jack’s was playing team sports with the Salem County Civic Softball League and the Pennsville Basketball Rec League. Jack and Trudi along with friends loved exploring far away destinations, the Scandinavian countries were Jack’s favorites. But his greatest joy was sitting and talking with his children and five grandchildren. A Memorial Service will take place at the Woodstown Presbyterian Church, 46 Auburn Street, Woodstown, NJ on May 31, 2019 at 11:00 am with a light lunch and visitation time following the service. Burial will take place in the church Memorial Garden at the convenience of the family. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Woodstown Beautification Committee c/o Lester Robeson, 160 East Avenue, Woodstown, NJ 08098 or the Woodstown Presbyterian Church, 46 Auburn Street, Woodstown, NJ 08098.