Tag Archives: Williston Academy

Irwin Kelman Cohen ’53

Irwin Kelman “Kel” Cohen, M.D., died on June 9, 2019, in Richmond, Virginia, at the age of 84. He passed away peacefully at his home with his wife at his side. Kel held confidently to his belief that life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but rather that one ought to skid in sideways, with the body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and while screaming “Wow – what a ride!” Kel is survived by his wife, Gayle Williams; his children, David (Candace) Cohen of Madison, Wisconsin and Nancy (Mike) Kotz of Kensington, Maryland; and his grandchildren Hunter, Lowell, Anna and Hannah. He is also survived by his wife’s daughter, Alison (Carl) Meadows and their children, Clara and Libby. He was preceded in death by his parents, Morris and Ida Kelman Cohen; and his brother, William Cohen. Kel was born March 30, 1935, in Troy, New York. He grew up in Massachusetts and on the shores of Lake Winnisquam in New Hampshire, where his lifelong love for the Boston Red Sox was sparked. After graduating from Williston Academy in Massachusetts, he went on to his beloved Kenyon College and then graduated from Columbia University. He earned his M.D. from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill School of Medicine. Kel continued his training at Dartmouth, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and the National Institutes of Health, after which he realized he wanted to pursue an academic career because of the influence of his mentors at Kenyon and UNC. Kel came to Richmond in 1972 to the then Medical College of Virginia, now the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System and founded the Plastic Surgery program as well as the first Wound Healing Laboratory for research in the United States. His many years at MCV were a source of great fulfillment and satisfaction. He continued to support the university and its programs in any way he could long after retirement. As an educator, Kel served on the Board of Plastic Surgery and was an editor of its journal. He founded the Wound Healing Society, served as its president and was the founding president of the Wound Healing Foundation. He lectured on wound healing and plastic surgery throughout the world, published over 125 papers and edited a definitive textbook on wound healing. His awards include Physician of the Year by the Richmond Maimonides Society and Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Wound Healing Society, The Society for the Advancement of Wound Care and the World Union of Wound Healing Societies. Prior to his death, he spearheaded the organization of the Wound Healing Coalition to give wound healing its proper place in medical science and its deserved recognition with the NIH, FDA, United States Congress, CMS and the public. Kel loved the residents and students he guided and felt a deep satisfaction in the good work they did in health care, knowing that his influence made a difference. He was loved in return by them and also by his countless patients, whom he always treated with respect, kindness and genuine caring, for his hope was to make a meaningful difference in their lives. Despite the rigorous demands of his career, Kel still found time to embrace life with zest and zeal, often while enjoying a memorable meal accompanied by a fine wine. He loved music, photography and cooking, and traveling the globe. He was a lifelong learner with curiosity about everything. He was a true blue Carolina Tar Heel fan. Kel embraced a wide circle of friends from many different occupations, countries, languages and backgrounds and he enjoyed keeping in frequent touch with all of them. Still, far above his career was his family and although at times work kept him from them, he agonized when it did. The accomplishments of which he was most proud are his children and grandchildren. Kel believed strongly that life was eternal because his children and grandchildren carried his DNA and he would always live through his offspring. To Kel, his children and grandchildren made him immortal and death would never be the victor. He loved the line from the poet E.E. Cummings, “How do you like your blue-eyed boy Mister Death?” A Celebration of Life will take place at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to a charity of one’s choice.

W. Kirkland Taylor ’53


Westervelt Kirkland (“Kirk”) Taylor passed away on May 7, 2019 at Swedish Medical Hospital in Seattle, Washington. He was 85 years old. A Seattle resident since the mid-1970’s, Kirk came to Seattle from New York to pursue his career as a civil rights and criminal defense attorney. Admitted to practice in Washington in 1977, Kirk joined the Seattle Public Defender office and soon became a senior attorney supervising and mentoring up-and-coming public defense attorneys. Thereafter, Kirk went on to practice privately handling criminal and civil rights cases as well as assignments in intellectual property, real estate and business law matters. Kirk’s nearly 50 years in the legal field began with his engineering expertise and tenure as a patent examiner in the United States Patent Office, followed by his years working at IBM in Fishkill, New York. The New York State Attica Correctional Prison riot of 1971 marked a pivotal professional turning point for Kirk who had made the decision to shift focus to civil rights and criminal defense. His activism and defense work for inmates caught up in the Attica uprising reflected his passion to combine a zest for the law and legal training with a desire to fight for the rights of individuals, including those downtrodden, marginalized or however challenged by the justice system. While sparring with adversaries, Kirk’s unassuming demeanor masked his talent for negotiating and unrelenting spirit to win. And, guided by a humanitarian ethos, his approachable style resonated with many clients who have shared accolades and heartfelt thanks for his work. Kirk earned his Juris Doctor from American University’s Washington College of Law. A graduate of the University of Pennsylvania’s Moore School of Electrical Engineering, he held a Bachelor of Science degree in electrical engineering. Before college, Kirk graduated from The Williston Northampton School in Massachusetts. An outdoorsman, Kirk swapped leisure time spent on Martha’s Vineyard for a joyful life in the Pacific Northwest, often remarking on its beauty and sharing tales of his sailing, fishing, camping and hiking pursuits. He cherished his regular jogs along Lake Washington, workouts at the YMCA and quite a few other favorite pastimes, such as playing poker and chess with his inner circle of friends and colleagues. While his reading list was broad, Kirk was a devotee of the detective genre. And, his overseas travels to Southeast Asia, Brazil and Europe provided even more enchanting stories to tell. Forever an animal lover, Kirk always had a spirited canine companion at his side. Born in New York City on December 20, 1933, Kirk was raised in the St. Albans area of Queens, New York. His father, Westervelt A. Taylor, was a Queens County district attorney and MIT (class of 1927) and Fordham Law graduate, and mother, Zenaide Anderson Taylor, a teacher. A jazz music enthusiast, he recalled during his youth a home filled with music as Mom played piano and at times close St. Albans friends and neighbors, some of whom revered as jazz legends, would visit and join in. In a ceremony officiated by his uncle, the Reverend Jesse F. Anderson, Sr. of Philadelphia, Kirk married Dorothy H. Anderson in the spring of 1959 and is survived and will be missed greatly by their children Kevin, Karen and Todd Taylor. In 2015, Kirk married again and is survived by his wife of 4 years, Patricia Espey. Grandchildren, along with the rest of his family and friends, will remember him fondly as well.

Rodney C. Farnham ’56

Rodney C. “Rod” Farnham, 82, passed away Friday, April 26, 2019, after a long illness. He leaves his wife of 59 years, Phyllis (Underwood) Farnham; his son, James T. Farnham and his wife Linda of Ipswich; his daughter, Merideth J. Farnham of Orlando, Fla.; and his son, Stuart T. Farnham and his wife Julie of Colorado Springs, Colo. He is survived by seven grandchildren, Benjamin, Nathaniel, Elizabeth, Rachel, Hannah, Cole, and John Farnham; and one great-granddaughter, Halie. He is also survived by his sister-in-law and her husband, Grace and Bob Varney; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his brother, John R. Farnham. Rod was born and raised in Northampton, the son of the late F. Russell and Irene (May) Farnham. He spent his early years between Lake Dunmore, Vermont, and western Massachusetts. He attended Williston Academy and was an alumnus of the University of Massachusetts. He met his future wife, Phyllis, at UMass, marrying in 1959. They lived in Conn., Mass., and N.H., throughout their marriage, residing in Hingham for over thirty years. Rod was a retired Reinsurance Executive and was an avid golfer, gardener and cook. He and Phyllis loved to vacation in Vermont, Cape Cod, and Canada. No funeral services are currently scheduled. A private burial may occur at a later date. Donations in memory of Rod can be made to the Norwell Visiting Nurses Association and Hospice via the NVNA and Hospice Charitable Fund, 120 Longwater Drive, Norwell, MA 02061, 781-610-1409.

Jack D. Hathaway ’55


With sad but peaceful hearts we announce the death of Jack Dalton Hathaway. Jack passed away peacefully at home in Woodstown, New Jersey, early Tuesday morning, May 14, 2019 at age 83. Born January 11, 1936 to Harry and Edith Clark Dalton in Ware, Massachusetts, Jack’s biological father died at an early age and Jack was subsequently adopted by his stepfather Holland Marsh Hathaway, whom he always considered his father. Jack is survived by his wife of 59 years, Gertrude “Trudi” Huber Hathaway and their two sons, John Clark Hathaway (Judy) and Douglas Huber Hathaway (Nan) and their five grandchildren, Evan, Clark, Caroline, Elizabeth and Hillary. He is also survived by his brother Clark P. Hathaway (Linda). Jack grew up in Nahant, Massachusetts and Barrington, Rhode Island. He attended Barrington High School and Williston Academy, a boarding preparatory school in Easthampton, Massachusetts, where he lettered in soccer and basketball. In 1959 he graduated from Gettysburg College with a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and History. He earned a Master’s in Education from Shippensburg University in 1968. His athletic career in soccer and basketball followed him to Gettysburg College and in 2008, Jack was inducted into the Gettysburg College Hall of Athletic Honor. At Gettysburg Jack was a member of Phi Gamma Delta Fraternity. After college, Jack served in the Army and married his college sweetheart. He began his teaching and coaching careers in 1962 at Waynesboro High School in Waynesboro, Pennsylvania. In 1968 his family moved to South Jersey where he accepted a position as teacher and head basketball coach at Pennsville Memorial High School. In 1980 Jack established the boys’ varsity soccer program at Pennsville High School and coached for many years. Jack truly loved teaching and coaching and made a difference in the lives of many of his students as evidenced by letters he often received years after they graduated. In 1984 he was named New Jersey Social Studies Teacher of the Year and in 1990 he was an exchange teacher to Russia with a program called “Hands Across the Water”. Community volunteerism was always a significant part of Jack’s life. When he moved to South Jersey, he became involved immediately with the Salem County YMCA, which allowed him to work with the youth in the Woodstown area. After his retirement in 1993 from public education he took on numerous volunteer positions. He was a board member of the American Red Cross for NJ – PA and for 18 years he coordinated the Woodstown Red Cross Blood Drive. He was a Salem County Habitat Board member and was President from 1999 – 2002; past chairperson of the Woodstown Historic Preservation Commission; a founding member of the Woodstown Beautification Committee and worked endlessly to secure funding for lampposts and flags in the Borough of Woodstown. Jack was a valued mentor in the Interfaith Council Tutoring Program for 18 years and was a dedicated volunteer for Meals on Wheels. In 2017 he was recognized for his decades of volunteer leadership by receiving the Woodstown Outstanding Citizen Award. Although he served on several boards and committees within the Woodstown Presbyterian Church, he always felt that his time as a Deacon was the most important. He went on three Mission Trips to Romania to help build a Christian Orphanage and numerous mission trips within the U.S. Jack loved spending time in Cape May with his family and friends. One of his favorite pastimes was gathering twice a month with his Hearts group always with a goal of “shooting the moon”. An extra special pastime of Jack’s was playing team sports with the Salem County Civic Softball League and the Pennsville Basketball Rec League. Jack and Trudi along with friends loved exploring far away destinations, the Scandinavian countries were Jack’s favorites. But his greatest joy was sitting and talking with his children and five grandchildren. A Memorial Service will take place at the Woodstown Presbyterian Church, 46 Auburn Street, Woodstown, NJ on May 31, 2019 at 11:00 am with a light lunch and visitation time following the service. Burial will take place in the church Memorial Garden at the convenience of the family. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Woodstown Beautification Committee c/o Lester Robeson, 160 East Avenue, Woodstown, NJ 08098 or the Woodstown Presbyterian Church, 46 Auburn Street, Woodstown, NJ 08098.

James N. Perkins ’51

Jim Perkins, entrepreneur, writer, sportsman, conservationist and patriot, died April 16, 2019. He was 85.
Born in Littleton, NH, a hardscrabble town near the Canadian border, he was the son of Nick and Lucia Perkins, who emigrated from Greek Macedonia. His parents built a life in Littleton opening a popular restaurant, The White Mountain Café, where Jim learned to wash dishes, bake pies and make friends. The family later opened the Perkins Motel, the first Florida style resort motel in the state.
Jim grew up hiking, hunting, fishing and skiing, fostering a lifelong love of the mountains and respect for the environment. The beneficiary of his parents’ reverence for education, Jim graduated from Williston Academy and Dartmouth College.
While at Dartmouth he was mentored by Corey Ford, a prolific humor and nature writer. While still in college, Jim was published in The Saturday Evening Post and Field and Stream and co-wrote a screenplay for John Wayne’s independent film company, Batjac Productions.
Jim described his rich and varied career as “moving words and pictures in various ways.” His early achievements included executive positions with Curtis Publishing, Doubleday & Co., Playboy Press and The Times Mirror Company, where he initiated successful book projects such as the Outdoor Bible Series and the Audubon Nature Encyclopedia, which sold millions of copies.
Following his corporate publishing career Jim started his own marketing agency. He went on to originate The Home Shopping Show, a half-hour program delivered by satellite on which national advertisers such as Revlon, Pillsbury and Chevrolet demonstrated their products. Advertising Age called Jim a “new media visionary and one of the original cable idea men.” He joined with the Hearst Corporation and ABC Television to head a venture specializing in cable programming and is credited with creating the original Lifetime and ARTS networks. Next, he followed the developing technology, creating communication projects for a joint venture between Citibank, Nynex and RCA called CNR Partners.
Conservation was a continuing thread in Jim’s life. As an Air Force lieutenant he worked in the Office of Public Information. He became a captain and as one of the most junior officers in the Pentagon, Jim developed a program to designate Air Force bases as conservation areas. His concept was accepted and it is credited with protecting some 30 million acres and hundreds of endangered species of plants and animals on military bases around the world. For this big idea Jim received The U.S. Commendation Medal, the nation’s second highest peacetime award. More recently he was honored again by the Department of Defense for “One Good Idea.”
After moving to Litchfield County, Connecticut, Jim became a trustee of the Sunny Valley Association, protecting 2,500 acres. He originated and chaired The New Milford Inland Wetlands Commission and was president of The Housatonic Valley Association. He received an official citation from the Connecticut General Assembly for helping to protect thousands of acres in Kent from projected casino development.
An avid athlete, Jim loved cruising on his trawler The Chimera, and was still skiing in his 80s in Colorado and Montana. He also loved golf, heading up the Northwest Seniors League, and was a 28-year member of The Lake Waramaug Country Club.
Fearless, intelligent, hardworking, stylish, curious, generous and fun, he was known as “a guy who makes things happen.” Beloved husband, father, brother and patriarch, Jim is survived by Judy, his wife of 40 years, and daughters Susan (an MBA, CFA, attorney and skydiver), Karen (a PhD in molecular biology, educator and triathlon competitor) and Elizabeth (a stage, film and television actor). His survivors also include his sister Pamela Perkins; brothers-in-law Bruce Berger and James Holb; sons-in-law Julio Macat and Jon Stark; his aunt Catherine Tegu; eight grandchildren; and many talented cousins, nieces and nephews, all of whom Jim loved and respected as individuals. He was preceded in death by his sister Nitsa Perkins Bailey.
Jim’s autobiography By Way of Luck – How Chance Shaped a Storied Life, chronicles his ever evolving adventures.
Services will be held June 8, 2019 at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Kent, where Jim was a member of The Vestry. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to The Kent Memorial Library, The Kent Volunteer Fire Department or the Kent Land Trust.
Those who cannot attend may wish to send a note with a memory of Jim to judyperkins77@gmail.com.

Glenn F. Swanson ’64

Glenn Frank “Swanee” Swanson passed away on April 26, 2019 at his home in Easthampton, MA at the age of 73. He had just finished chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer and the cause of death was sudden and unexpected, but he did not suffer and his family is thankful for that. He will be remembered as a dedicated teacher, loving father, and supportive friend. Swanee was born in 1946 in Brockton, MA to Frank and Maida (Grinnell) Swanson. He graduated from the Williston Northampton School in Easthampton, MA, where he served as both proctor and captain of the soccer team and also played basketball and baseball. He attended Haverford College, graduating in 1968 with a degree in history, after which he returned to Williston as a teacher of history, and philosophy. He also earned a Masters in history from UMass Amherst. During his 46 years at Williston, he also coached many sports, and served as the Dean of Students for 17 years.

Click here to view the full obituary.

Richard O. Banyard ’62

Richard Otis Banyard, 74 of Wesley Chapel, FL passed away April 14, 2019 surrounded by his loving family. Rick spent his childhood in Bermuda. He graduated from Williston Academy in MA. He received his BS in Mechanical Engineering from Lafayette College in Easton, PA in 1967 and later earned his MS in Management Science from Fairleigh Dickinson College in NJ. He was employed by the Department of Defense at Fort Monmouth, NJ for 35 years in the CECOM Division. Rick enjoyed woodworking, playing the guitar, and listening to music, but most of all he loved cruising on his own boat up and down the east coast with his wife. He is preceded in death by parents: Captain Leslie (of the Queen of Bermuda) and Jane Banyard and brother Frederick Parker Banyard. Rick is survived by his wife of 50 years Sharon; daughter: Kimberly Knapp and husband Steve; son: Charles Banyard and spouse Cynthia; grandchildren: Tristan Spicer, Caelie Spicer, Kieran Spicer, Alexander Knapp and Austin Knapp.
In lieu of flowers please send donations to Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa at https://give.moffitt.org     “Take it easy Ferndock”.

William Lee Warner ’65

William Lee Warner, 72, passed away peacefully on Easter Sunday, April 21st, 2019, after a 17 month illness. He is survived by his adoring wife of 26 years, Anita, and loving nieces, Chloe Warner, Jennifer Jarden, and her daughters, Charlotte and Angelina. Born January 20th, 1947 to William and Dori Warner of Manhattan, Lee was the ultimate New Yorker. After attending St. Hilda’s and St. Hugh’s, and The Williston Northampton School, he received a BA from Columbia College and an MBA from NYU Stern. Lee was a Managing Director at J.P. Morgan Investment Management and then at Global Investment Advisors. Following a successful career in Money Management, he and Anita fulfilled their dream of sharing their time between Manhattan and Antibes, France. Celebration Service will be held at St. Bartholomew’s Chapel, 325 Park Ave., New York, on April 30th at 3:30 pm. Donations in Lee’s memory may be made to the Rhodes Center for Glioblastoma, New York Presbyterian, Office of Development, 850 Third Avenue, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10022.

Richard B. Brady ’58

Richard B. Brady, 79, beloved husband of Irene T. Brady, passed away due to complications of lung cancer on March 18, 2019. Dick was the son of John F. and Gertrude (Clifford) Brady, and was born on August 15, 1939 in Hartford, Connecticut. A life-long resident of West Hartford, he was a man of strong faith in God and known for his humor. He loved golfing, fishing and boating and summers at Old Lyme Shores. A humble man and wonderful storyteller, he loved to ignite the imagination of others, including young children with his story of the “green hand.” Dick is survived by: his wife of 54 years, Irene; his sister, Gillian Hollister and her husband, Bob; his Four Bouys (the fond name of his boat): Christopher, Patrick, Peter and Kevin, and their spouses and significant others; and his four grandchildren he adored, Ryan, Caitlyn, Kathryn and Ayn, as well as many nieces and nephews. Dick was predeceased by his brother, Jack, and is survived by Jack’s wife Cathy. Friends may call at Molloy Funeral Home, 906 Farmington Avenue, West Hartford, on Sunday, March 24th from 2 pm until 5 pm. A Mass will be held on Monday, March 25th at 10 am at St. Thomas the Apostle Church, 872 Farmington Ave., West Hartford, CT 06119, followed by burial at Fairview Cemetery, 200 Whitman Avenue, West Hartford. In lieu of flowers, donations In Memory of Richard B. Brady may be made to the Smilow Cancer Hospital at the St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center (www.saintfrancisdonor.com) or the American Cancer Society (cancer.org). Online expressions of sympathy at www.molloyfuneralhome.com.
And, as Dick would say, “See ya around the globe.”

Edward J. O’Brien ’46

Edward (Skitzie) O’Brien, 89, of Keene, NH passed away at the Cheshire Medical Center Saturday January 14, 2017 after a period of failing health. He was born Oct. 09, 1927 in Keene to parents Edward O’Brien and Ann (Chardon) O’Brien. He was a lifelong resident of Keene attending local schools graduating from Keene High in 1945. After graduation he served his country by joining the US Navy. Upon leaving the service he achieved his undergraduate and law degrees from Boston University. He returned to Keene upon graduation joining the law firm of Homer Bradley and Dick Fernald until establishing his own private practice. At one time he served as the Keene City Attorney becoming involved in creating and planning Keene’s first subdivision. In 1964 he became Cheshire County attorney, a position he held for almost 30 years. Initially it was a part time job he balanced along with his private practice. In the 1980’s the influx of court cases increased to a point where the position became full time and later expanded to include two full time assistants. Upon leaving the position of County Attorney he returned to private practice retiring at the age of 76. During his career he held many professional and city wide volunteer positions. In the 1960’s he served as a member of the Keene School board and was co-chairman for several years. He also took part in the School Planning Board during a period of time of increasing school enrollment. He was active in the local Lions Club and a member of the American Legion. He was an accomplished trumpet player and one of his greatest pleasures was playing in the American Legion Band and the taking part in the Lions Club annual performances. He enjoyed being around his fellow band members playing at concerts and performing in parades in Keene and other locations throughout the country. Golf was another favorite pastime of his and you could often see him on the course two or three times a week. Skiing was another. He and his late wife, Patricia, loved spending time at their Spofford lake house when not at their Keene residence. Ed enjoyed telling stories about growing up in Keene in the 30’s and 40’s and what life was like back then with the people he knew and the activities that they did. His ability to talk, help and get along with anybody was a great quality of his. To those that knew him he was a loving father and a compassionate friend. Ed is survived by his daughter Lauren Berube and husband Bob of Lewiston ME., son Matthew O’Brien and wife Gail of Keene, son Nathan and wife Lesley of West Chesterfield, a daughter in law Christina O’Brien of Keene, stepson Michael Bomba and wife Sarah of Hinsdale and stepdaughter Lisa Bomba of Hinsdale. He is also survived by his first wife and good friend Jane O’Brien, several grandchildren and great grandchildren, a niece Cheryl Soones and nephew Steven Oliver both of Summerland Key FL. He was predeceased by his wife Patricia, his son Mark and granddaughter Stephanie Little. Friends and family are invited to call on Friday January 20, 2017 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Foley Funeral Home located at 49 Court Street, Keene. A private graveside service will be held in the spring. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the National Kidney Foundation with the following web address information https://www.kidney.org/support.