Glynis A. Douglass ’76

A sweet and kind light has gone out. It is with deep sadness that at 2:20p on Monday, April 19, 2021, we released Glynis Ann Douglass back to the ethereal universe. She was a constant caring presence to those of us who were blessed by her love. Quietly and subtly, she would leave notes and thoughtful little gifts of food and soul nourishment to ease our daily journeys. Glynis was a gifted artist with a keen intellect and spot-on moral compass. She saw and reflected our flaws and frailties in the kindest of lights. Her judgements were true, but carefully tempered for only the slightest sting. She had a razor-sharp wit, but she lived by moderation and never hit harder than necessary to reveal an alternative perspective.
Glynis was born in Manhattan on January 9, 1959, to Sharon Luley Douglass and Malcolm Welsh Douglass. On May 4, 1961, Glynis lost her only (then) four-year-old brother, Angus Fitzgerald Douglass, to the sea. Arianna and I (Jillian) were born thereafter, but the loss of Angus left a void for her, that was only filled 28 years later on September 21, 1987, with the birth of Jared Maurice Sacks, the true Light of Glynis’s Love. Glynis was a gentle, but fiercely protective, and completely devoted mother.
As a child Glynis had an extraordinary will. At the tender age of 5, she challenged my father to a race that lasted at least a mile, before my father called out to her that she had won. For the rest of his life, my father would confide in Glynis and trust her to be strong, independent and capable. She carried this lesson of mutual respect forth in everything she did.
Glynis was a sharp and curious student. She attended Williston Northampton School from 1974 to 1976, where she studied visual and performance arts. She quickly learned and applied vast amounts of information and feeling into well-organized and well-founded original works. She became a talented printer, painter and lithographer. She went on to receive a BA in Art History from UMass Amherst, graduating early in 1979. She became an Assistant Editor for Boston Arts Magazine and continued her art studies at Massachusetts College of Art. She was awarded a Guggenheim scholarship and pursued a Masters’ degree abroad, in Italy.
Glynis exhibited her greatest creativity and passion in her boundless generosity and constant capacity to share “random acts of kindness”. She enjoyed cooking and planning meals and gatherings, but her highest joy was serving & tasting delicious foods. She loved volunteering with Food4Kids at Church of the Holy Spirit in Orleans. Those of us in her care and under her protective wings (including her close friends, and especially my mother during her final years of life) were, and will always be, truly blessed.
In her final days at Tufts Medical Center, with deepest gratitude to all the doctors and staff, Glynis chose Hospice over life-extending treatments. In honor of Glynis’s gracious spirit, please give as generously as you can to Hospice, the Tibetan Nun Project, or the humanitarian charity of your choice.

4 thoughts on “Glynis A. Douglass ’76”

  1. I remember Glynis from Williston and sorry to hear of her passing. Thank you for sharing some of her life’s journey. She and her family are in our thoughts and prayers now.

    I lost contact with her after we left Williston, but i do feel a kindred spirit with her, as i had three sons born between ’86 and ’89. So we travelled a similar road. Rest in peace friend.

  2. She was a gentle soul. Always kind and so thoughtful. My condolences and thoughts are with her family as they go through this most difficult time!

  3. My sincere condolences for your dear and thoughtful family member and friend.
    Glynis will be greatly missed by all who knew her.

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