Stories and updates from around campus

On a Special Pen, the Fine Print, and an Extended Family

Four outstanding Williston athletes commit to their next steps

IMG_2173a (1)There was a lot of lighthearted banter in the Grubbs Gallery on Monday afternoon as four of Williston Northampton School’s top athletes gathered for ceremonies to highlight their college commitments.

Andrew Liu, Ryan Richmond, and John “Marshall” Rizutto signed National Letters of Intent with Assumption College, Bentley University, and Edinboro University, respectively. George “Curt” Mcleod was also recognized for committing to Cornell University.

“Read the fine print—make sure!” yelled one teammate as Mr. Mcleod inked his name. The football player grinned; the paper he was using was a prop for the ceremony.

Mr. Rizutto, a fellow football star, also got a ribbed, with teammates reminding him not to lose the ceremonial signing pen.

“It’s your special pen, Marshall!” “Marshall, don’t lose that pen!” they called.

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Gold Runs in the Family

Courtesy of Abbie Foster
Courtesy of Abbie Foster

Gold is starting to be a tradition in the Foster family.

In 2013, Olivia Foster ’14 received a gold medal for completing the national Congressional Award program, a four-year process that involved extensively documenting her work in public service, personal development, physical fitness, and exploration. As a result of her commitment, she was awarded the program’s highest honor at a ceremony in Washington D.C.

The benefits of going through such a long and rigorous process—that it created someone well rounded, instilled self-confidence, and was extremely rewarding—did not go unnoticed by Ms. Foster’s younger sister, Abbie.

Three years ago, as the younger Foster was starting her own Congressional Award process, she asked her sister Olivia for advice.

“She said, ‘Even if some days you don’t feel like doing it, or don’t know the reason you’re doing it, don’t give up and then it will be worth it,” Abbie Foster ’16 recalled. “And it definitely was.”

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Paying Attention to The Heart

Marcus Ware and Jordan Sansone '17 team up to bring awareness to Williston for Heart Health Month
Photo by Dennis Crommett
Photo by Dennis Crommett

On January 20, the text alerts started pouring into Marcus Ware’s cell phone.

There was a shooter at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He had entered the Carl J. and Ruth Shapiro Cardiovascular Center on the second floor. Shots had been fired at a doctor there. The gunman had turned the gun on himself. Police were at the hospital and had secured the scene.

The news was devastating, and incredibly personal for Dr. Ware, he explained to Williston Northampton School students and faculty during an assembly on February 18.

“You see, I paused for a bit because I am a patient at Brigham and Women’s and have been so for the past 10 years,” he said. “Given that I’ve had high familiarity with the hospital due to the number of visits and procedures that I have had done over the years, these text alerts made me stop in my tracks and pray that all was okay.”

Dr. Ware, a former Williston faculty member, had returned to campus to speak about his own experiences for Heart Health Month. The event was organized by Jordan Sansone ’17, her advisor Ann Pickrell, and Assistant Director of Athletics and Head Athletic Trainer Melissa Brousseau. Later that afternoon, Ms. Sansone also offered a screenings and a confidential six-point questionnaire for students in the Athletic Center during a girls basketball game.

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Photographers’ Lecture Series Explores Light, Darkness

The series features experts Eduardo Angel, Abelardo Morell, and David Wells
Courtesy of Eduardo Angel
Courtesy of Eduardo Angel

Exploring light and dark—how to capture it, how to play with it, and how to mold it with equipment both new and old—is at the core of this year’s Photographers’ Lecture Series.

Eduardo Angel, Abelardo Morell, and David Wells work with vastly different mediums—from the high paced digital world to the camera obscura, one of the oldest-known imaging devices—but bring a common interest in illumination and its sources.

The three are also dedicated educators, using a range of blogs, podcasts, and online courses to explore photography and filmography in all its forms: equipment, lighting, composition, framing, and other creative and technical skills.

“I was looking for a range of image makers,” wrote Fine and Performing Arts Teacher Ed Hing, who organizes the series. “Abelardo is well known for his work with the camera obscura, Eduardo is a technical wizard, and David is a working photojournalist. All will bring something different / unique to the students.”

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Jacy Good to Students: Nothing on Your Phone is Worth a Life

The Wright Speaker Series talk explored the dangers of distracted driving
Photo by Dennis Crommett
Photo by Dennis Crommett

When Jacy Good announced she was going to put her hair in a ponytail, the audience in the Phillips Stevens Chapel fell completely silent.

Ms. Good reached up with her right arm, the only one she can use now, swept her hair up with one hand and secured it. It was a simple task—one most people could do without thinking.

Yet for Ms. Good, who was left critically injured after a 2008 car crash, the act of putting her hair in a ponytail is a reminder not only of the accident, and the distracted driver who caused it, but of a hospital stay and the months of rehabilitation that followed.

Photo by Dennis Crommett
Photo by Dennis Crommett

It’s a reminder of the loss of her parents, both killed during the crash, and of the crusade to change the laws on cell phone use that she and her husband have pursued ever since.

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Stories and updates from around campus