Tag Archives: Class of 1958

Susan B. Martula ’58

Susan Barbara Martula, 80, retired principal clarinetist with the Albany Symphony, died on June 28, 2021 at her home in Troy, New York.

Susan, the daughter of the late John and Helen Martula, grew up in Hadley, Massachusetts. She earned a Bachelor of Arts in Music from Smith College in 1962, and afterwards studied at the Paris Conservatory and worked for Nadia Boulanger. Upon her return to the States, she studied clarinet with Leon Russianoff at Manhattan School of Music, receiving a Master of Fine Arts in 1964. As a professional clarinetist Susan continued to study throughout her career and was a student of Larry Combs and, in later years, Steve Hartman. In addition to her work with the Albany Symphony she was principal clarinetist of the Berkshire Symphony. She also played with the American Symphony Orchestra under Leopold Stokowski, the Colorado Philharmonic, Lake George Opera, and others. She has recorded with Albany Records, New World, and Nonesuch.

Susan served on the faculties of Skidmore College and Williams College, where she was artist associate, led the Williams Clarinet Choir and performed with the Williams College Chamber Players. She was adjunct instructor in music at Emma Willard School and was the founding conductor of the orchestra.

Throughout her distinguished career, Susan taught and nurtured scores of young musicians. Her home was fondly referred to as “Camp Martula” by artists who traveled to the Capital Region to perform with the Albany Symphony. She took great delight in hosting her visiting colleagues, and regaled them with legendary dinners precisely timed to get the group to the concert hall on schedule.

Susan was fun to be around. She was charming, gracious, and had a keen wit. People enjoyed her elegant sense of fashion and great smile. She displayed these same qualities during her recent years of treatment for her illness and the pandemic. She stayed as active as possible, even swimming long distances in the ocean which was a lifelong passion, and continuing her Pilates, another passion. Most importantly, she planned and did joyful things like getting ice cream with those she loved. Susan knew how to enjoy every moment that was given to her.

She was predeceased by her husband of 29 years, David A. Perry, M.D. She is survived by brothers Dick (Ann) Martula and David (Tanyss) Martula, nephew Stefan and niece Rose (David), grandniece Brooke, stepdaughter Noelle and stepson Nathan (Amy), goddaughter Deslyn (Alex), and eight grandchildren: Kage, Kevin, Cameron, Mia, MacKenzie, Isabelle, Penda and Charlotte.

Thank you to the Community Hospice of Rensselaer County and all the health care workers, especially Bibi, Jennifer, Dee, and Wendy, who assisted Susan during her illness. Special thanks also to Susan’s circle of deeply devoted friends, especially Ellen, Victor, and Mitsuko.

Burial will be private and a memorial service is planned for later this year.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in memory of Susan B. Martula to the Albany Symphony Orchestra Inc., 19 Clinton Avenue, Albany, NY 12207, or to the Berkshire Symphony, Bernhard Music Center, 54 Chapin Hall Drive, Williamstown, MA 01267.

Elria Giamatti Ewing ’58

Elena Maria Giamatti Ewing died at home with family in Portsmouth, NH, on April 15, 2021, of complications from dementia. She was born in Boston on June 14, 1940, to Valentine Giamatti, son of Italian immigrants, and Mary Walton, daughter of the Yankee establishment. Her two-year-old brother promptly and permanently re-christened her Elria. She grew up an American original, with a personality as unique as her name, vibrant, independent, and strong-willed.
Elria was raised in South Hadley, Mass., where her father was on the faculty of Mount Holyoke College. When the family moved to postwar Rome for her father’s sabbatical year, her uninhibited personality was found disruptive in first grade at the Swiss-German School. So she stayed home and learned Italian from maids and neighbors, including Mussolini’s daughter, Edda, then recently released from prison. She also met Pope Pius XII when the family received a private audience. Italian became her fluent second language then and during her father’s later sabbatical in Rome, and her college junior year in Florence.
Her skirmishes with organized education continued through South Hadley public schools, the American Overseas School of Rome, the Northampton School for Girls in Northampton, MA, Wells College in Aurora, NY, and the School of General Studies at Columbia University, where she earned a BS degree in Romance languages in 1963.
She was a natural athlete, good at horseback riding, tennis, and skiing.
Elria got to know David Ewing over many summers at camp in New Hampshire. They were married in 1963. Their first year of married life was in Sierra Leone, West Africa, where both taught secondary school. Their first son was born there by unplanned caesarian section in a rural Catholic mission hospital. The young family grew by three in the next four years after they returned to the States.
Elria repeatedly created secure and nurturing homes for the family as David’s work took them to four countries of Asia and Europe, as well as Virginia, Washington, D.C., and New York City. She was ever a formidable advocate for them with the inevitable bureaucracies of life and education, bruising a few egos in the process.
Fortunately, she had a restless nature; she counted 19 moves in her life. When she wasn’t moving, she was traveling. Her children remember, not always fondly, a rail tour of Europe when they were ages 10 to 14 under the Spartan guidance of Europe on $10 a Day. She avoided flying but counted 25 ocean sailings starting in 1947, including two Pacific crossings. She and David took the Queen Mary II to Europe in its inaugural year and five roundtrips thereafter.
Elria also counted at least 15 jobs, including stints in local newspaper advertising and real estate. She was a natural teacher. She taught English to Japanese schoolgirls and to adult groups including the Taipei City Council and Japanese housewives. She coordinated a program to find summer jobs for American teens in Tokyo. She related particularly well to young people, and is fondly remembered by alumni of the American School in Japan, where she worked in the library, and American University in Washington, D.C, where she was an academic counselor.
Retirement years took the couple to East Dover, Vermont, where she raised llamas and opened an antique shop, and finally to Portsmouth, where they have lived for 19 years. She liked New York City, Lord &Taylor and Italian opera. She joined choral singing groups in Vermont and New Hampshire.
Wherever she went, Elria made friends and was known for her cooking and entertaining, with an international accent. She was active in community organizations, often making sure people were well fed. In Portsmouth she organized the first lobster bake and the first holiday caroling for the South End neighborhood association, both of which became annual events. She was a member of the Academy of Senior Professionals at Eckerd College (Fla.) and the New Hampshire chapter of The Colonial Dames of America at Portsmouth’s Moffatt-Ladd House.
Elria’s family is deeply grateful to the exceptional caregivers who made it possible for her to remain at home in comfort during her last years.
She is survived by her husband; son Jeffrey Ewing and wife Daphne of Conshohocken, Pa.; son Dino Ewing and wife Janine of Eastchester, N.Y.; daughter Valentina Leonard and husband Edward of Acton, Mass.; son Nathaniel Ewing and wife Emily of Nottingham, N.H.; ten grandchildren; one great-granddaughter; and a brother Dino Giamatti and wife Barbara of Scarborough, Maine. She was predeceased by her parents and an older brother, A. Bartlett Giamatti.
She will be remembered at private observances. Memorial contributions to the Alzheimer’s Association are suggested.

Donald M. Barnard ’58

Donald M. Barnard, 81, of East Hartford, CT, beloved husband of the late Joanne (Rogers) Barnard passed away on Thursday, April 1, 2021 at St. Francis Hospital, Hartford. He was born on May 31, 1939 in Hartford, son of the late Leon and Mary (Miller) Barnard. Don grew up in Bloomfield, attended Bloomfield High, graduated from Williston Academy in 1958, served in the US Army from 1962 to 1965 stationed at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, graduated cum laude with an Associates Degree in Engineering from Ward Tech (UHART), attending classes while working for Pratt & Whitney full time. Don lived in East Hartford, working at Pratt both before the army and from 1965 to 1999, biking to work as a young father. When not at work, he could often be found attending to the yard, listening to music, working on the house or enjoying the shade of a pine tree in the side yard. Although Don retired from Pratt in 1999, he continued as a consultant for another 2 years. Don tested aircraft engines and aircraft engine parts and, in the process, forged close friendships lasting a lifetime. Don played the piano by ear, having had a few years of lessons as a young boy, continuing to enjoy playing for his own pleasure throughout his life, and for family and friends, such as at Worcester Poly Tech as a TEKE (Tau Kappa Epsilon, Zeta-Mu Chapter, circa 1959). For over 40 years, Don and his family spent their vacations tent camping at Acadia National Park in Maine, where he enjoyed hiking, canoeing, stargazing, cooking and eating meals by the campfire. Don and his wife Joanne continued to tent camp in Acadia for years after their children had grown, often with close friends Doug and Karen or Bob and Ellen. Don and Joanne shared their lives and many interests including nature, photography, cooking and beautifying and maintaining their yard and gardens and home, and did so together for 47 years until her passing in 2009. In his later years from his home in East Hartford, Don continued to study and appreciate the stars and planets through his telescope and music through his Hi-Fi stereo system; and the natural world, UCONN girl’s basketball and golf through television and his many maps. Don kept a journal, kept track of dates and took precise measurements at work and in the kitchen. After Joanne’s passing, Don would keep in close contact with old friends and family through many phone conversations. Don was always deeply dedicated to his family and leaves behind his son, Donald M. Barnard Jr. and his wife, Brenda of Colchester, his daughter, Christine Neal and her husband, Timothy of Harwinton. He leaves behind his sister, Barbara Douglas and her husband, Craig and three grandchildren, Andrew, Justin and Daniel Neal. He is predeceased by his brother, Leon “Peter” Barnard and leaves many nieces, nephews and cousins. His family will receive friends and family Saturday, May 15, 2021 from 2-3 PM followed by funeral services at 3:00 PM at Carmon Funeral Home, 807 Bloomfield Ave., Windsor. Flowers and sharing of memories are appreciated. Tribute donations may be made in Don’s (and Joanne’s) memory to Friends of Acadia at https://friendsofacadia.org/tribute-gift/ or by calling 207-288-3340.

Stephan M. Heider ’58

Stephan Moore Heider was born in Northampton, Massachusetts on March 24, 1940, and was raised in Lawrence, Kansas. His parents, Fritz and Grace Heider, taught psychology at the University of Kansas for many years. The family also included oldest brother Karl, middle brother John, and the English Springer Spaniel Tony.

Steve was always fascinated with electricity, and according to his mother, explored the electrical plugs at an early age. At Pinkney grammar school he built an intercom and then a lighting board for the high school theatre. As he grew up, he bought World War II surplus parts and built his own radios and other devices. He got his Ham radio license (WØLUB) when was he was 12. (In later years, he was very proud to be a member of the Quarter Century Wireless Association.)

After high school, Steve selected physics as career path, and did his undergraduate work both domestically and abroad, in Durham, England. Along with his course work, he continued his independent exploration of applied technology, and at the University of Minnesota, he worked at the same radio station as Garrison Keillor.

Steve first came to Buffalo when he was accepted to the University at Buffalo (UB) doctorate program in physics in 1966. He dreamed of having computer analytics when memory was 4 kilowords in a Data General early computer. Building his equipment from scratch took time but resulted in several papers in atomic physics. After graduating in 1976, he left to go to Pittsburgh to work on computerizing mass spectrometers.

When Steve returned to Buffalo in 1978, he worked at the UB Physics Department and then choose to be an Independent consultant. He helped a number of businesses, including General Electric, computerize their equipment for data analytics. Steve felt strongly about keeping people employed using technology and not taking jobs away through automation.

Steve met future wife Arvela at the UB Flint loop bus stop in 1979. After getting their marriage license in Niagara Falls, they went to a Chinese restaurant and fortunately found out their zodiac signs were compatible. Steve married Arvela on May 7, 1983. They bought a “fixer upper” house in 1984 and enjoyed working on making it into a wonderful home.

Steve and Arvela’s 37-year marriage was a joyful partnership founded on intellectual curiosity and exploration. They built a business, Holark Systems—a collaboration from the name to the work itself. Their life together was also filled with many trips to science museums in the US, England, Europe, and even Australia. At home, their bookcases were lined with books on all subjects, and Steve remarked how he would read the titles and the books would reach out and grab him. Breakfasts were often delayed by a delightful read.

He was much beloved by his nieces and nephews. They (and their children) also brought great joy into his life. At almost two, the very youngest great-niece shows a desire to explore the world around her much the way Steve did all of his life.

Steve loved parties and we are planning on bringing family and friends together in the summer to share memories.

G. Arthur Padmore, Jr. ’58

George Arthur Padmore, Jr. was born in Monrovia, Liberia on January 12, 1940. He was the oldest of five sons born to Edith Mai Wiles Padmore and George Arthur Padmore, Sr.: Arthur, Ed, Gerald, Ronnie, and James “Wiki”.
When Arthur was still a young boy, his parents left him in Monrovia in the care of “Gran and Grampa” Euphemia and Edwin Barclay, while they went to Harbel to plant a newly acquired farm for Grampa Edwin Barclay. It was likely the influence of Grampa, an accomplished composer and musician, who was then serving as the 18th President of Liberia, that Arthur first developed his musical ear and lifelong love of music. It was also through the influence of Grampa Edwin Barclay, who introduced Arthur to the encyclopedia, that Arthur developed a lifelong love of learning.
Arthur grew up in the Barclay household with cousins Mary, Siata, and Earnest, and later also with Gran and Grampa Wiles at 99 Broad Street with cousins, Maakai (Sirleaf), Nehsee (Tubman), Myrna (Tolbert), Emmett Harmon, James (Wiles) and other relatives, as well as brothers Ed and Gerald. He attended St. Patrick’s Elementary School in Monrovia and then later attended high school at the College of West Africa (CWA). He left CWA in 1956 when his father was appointed Liberian Ambassador to the United States, and the entire family moved to Washington, D.C.
He graduated from The Williston Academy (now Williston Northampton School) in Easthampton, Massachusetts and matriculated to Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island and lived at Harkness House, where he made lifelong friends like John “Hoss” Frank and Carl Wattenberg. He was accepted into Boston University School of Law but later returned to Liberia where he received his law degree from the University of Liberia.
In 1965, he married Pairlene Eleanor Thomas and they had three daughters: Dawn Mai, Shirley (Mensah), and Soenda (Norman). A true disciple of cool jazz and pretty much everything else that went along with that genre of music, Arthur enjoyed his young adult years as a member of Monrovia’s Crowd 18 and as co-founder of “The WAVE.” A popular nightclub in Monrovia at the time, “The WAVE” was an acronym for co-founders “Winston (Richards), Arthur (Padmore), Varsay (Sirleaf) and Estrada (Bernard),” a name coined by Pairlene. Arthur also hosted the popular jazz radio show, “Music for Moderns,” which introduced many Liberians to jazz. Arthur and Pairlene’s home in Monrovia was often filled with friends, family, and music.
As a young father and husband, Arthur worked as hard as he played. He was General Manager of Liberia Amusements Limited which owned and operated popular
Monrovia movie theaters like the Relda among others. He also ran a law practice and branched out into various enterprises including a video rental business and gift shop.
Like so many Liberians, Arthur’s life as he knew it was upended by the military coup in April 1980. The friendships Arthur developed and maintained during his years in America paid off. For example, his longtime friend from Brown, John Frank, took in his two eldest girls to give Arthur and Pairlene time to settle. The family eventually settled in Wilmington, Delaware, where Arthur’s first cousin, Emmett Harmon, lived with his family.
Although things were not always easy, Arthur decided to make the best of his new life. He took a job selling insurance and he and Pairlene became dedicated members of the Cathedral Church of St. John, where he was eventually named senior warden. He also worked closely with the Liberian Association of Delaware, aiding those in need in Liberia.
Arthur also served as an administrative law judge for the Delaware Public Utilities Commission for fifteen years. In 2001, he was appointed by the Governor of Delaware to serve as the Public Advocate for the State of Delaware. In that role, he advocated on behalf of all consumers of regulated utility services such as gas, electric, water, and cable.
In the thirty-plus years he lived in Wilmington, Arthur took on the role of family elder. He spent countless hours curating and documenting the histories of the Barclay, Grimes, Padmore and Wiles families, using a computer program on Ancestry.com which at that time was in its infancy. He took great pleasure sharing the family history with all his extended family at family reunions and other gatherings.
In 2010, Arthur retired as Public Advocate and later moved with Pairlene to Cary, North Carolina to be closer to youngest daughter, Soenda, son-in-law, Carnley Norman, and grandchildren, Laura and Eleanor. They left countless friends and cherished memories in Wilmington.
After years of working hard and raising their family, Arthur and Pairlene were lucky to enjoy their respective retirements. They often traveled to St. Louis, Missouri to spend time with middle daughter, Shirley, her husband Paul, and granddaughters Olivia and Ava. Arthur was especially proud of the fact that he was present for Ava’s birth and often noted hers was the first birth he ever witnessed.
They visited daughter number one, Dawn (“Maisie”), in New York and never missed her performances as a classically trained Soprano. Arthur and Pairlene also traveled elsewhere within the United States to visit family and friends and often, together with friends and family, traveled to Europe, the Caribbean, China, and other far flung
places. They even invested in a small condominium in the Dominican Republic where they learned Spanish and how to dance Salsa. They continued to make friends along the way.
Their many travels were interrupted when Arthur developed a medical condition that led to episodic, but severe, illness. He eventually underwent surgery to address the condition. Unfortunately, complications from the surgery led to even greater health challenges. Over the past two years, Arthur valiantly faced every medical challenge that came his way (and there were many including total loss of vision). Throughout all of those challenges, his “Bride” of 55 years remained steadfastly by his side, caring for him with support from his daughters, his brother, Gerald, aunties, cousins, nieces, nephews, and many friends.
He died peacefully in the early morning hours of January 7, 2021, surrounded by his wife and his three daughters. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, his three daughters and sons-in-law, his four granddaughters, siblings, aunts, cousins, nieces, nephews and scores of other family and friends. He will be sorely missed by all who knew and loved him.

A. Michael Saaf ’58

Allen Michael Saaf, age 80, passed away peacefully on June 1, 2020 at Hospice of Dayton located in Ohio. He was the son of the late Allen E. Saaf and Marguerite K. Saaf, of New Canaan. Known to most as Mike, he was raised and lived in New Canaan for the first 60 years of his life. Mike attended New Canaan schools, Williston Northampton School and Hobart College. He spent many years working in New York for J. Walter Thompson, American Home Products, Uniroyal Tires, and Manoff Advertising. Mike then shifted to Real Estate by taking over the family business, Saaf Realtors, located in New Canaan. He was as an active member in various groups including Roton Point Beach Club, Ox Ridge Hunt Club (Polo Captain and New England Champion), Rombout Hunt Club, Lions Club, Men’s Club, New Canaan Bridle Path Association, YMCA Health Club, and New Canaan Indoor Tennis Club. He was a longtime supporter of the local Town Players and in 1952 took the stage himself in the show “Life with Father.” An equestrian enthusiast, Mike could be found riding in local and regional horse shows, as well as an avid participant in various fox hunts. Mike’s love of the outdoors was apparent from his passion for sailing, swimming, bike riding, and skiing. In early 2000, he moved to Fort Lauderdale and joined a local real estate brokerage while spending his days swimming in the ocean or riding his bike. He is survived by his former wife Barbara Bonham also of New Canaan with whom he had three children: Shelly Saaf and husband John Talk of Southern Pines, North Carolina and their 5 children, Jason and wife Denise Saaf of Portland, Maine and their 1 child, and Jennifer and husband Chris Hudson of Yellow Springs, Ohio with 2 adult children; as well as 1 great-grandchild. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Hospice of Dayton and the Greene County ASPCA.

Alan Hagstrom ’58

Alan “Chip” Hagstrom, 81, beloved husband of Grace C. (Callahan) Hagstrom, of Rockport, MA, passed away on Sunday morning, April 5, 2020.

Born in Gloucester on July 16, 1938, he was son of the late Edward and Ruth (Currier) Hagstrom. Chip was a graduate of Gloucester High School where he was a standout baseball and basketball player. He attended Williston Academy in Easthampton and played on the school’s soccer and tennis team. He went on to graduate from Boston University with his Bachelor’s degree in business administration. He was also a four year member of the BU crew team. After college, Chip had served in the U.S. National Guard.

Chip worked in the family business with his father Edward and his uncle George in the Hagstrom Construction Co. which he ran for many years and became well known on Cape Ann for his meticulous work. He later built and operated the Captain’s Lodge on Eastern Avenue where he also ran a coffee and sandwich shop, frequented not only by his lodgers but many family friends. In later years, Chip ran the buses for the Rockport school system.

Throughout his life, Chip remained very active in the community having served on the Board of Directors of Bank Gloucester for 39 years, longtime volunteer at Day by Day Adult Care, devout member of the Trinity Congregational Church and advocate for the YMCA. He was a member of the Economic Development Commission and was instrumental in the construction of the Blackburn Industrial Park. Chip was also an avid golfer and former member of the Bass Rocks Golf Club and Rockport Golf Club.

In addition to his wife Grace, he is survived by his son Alan Kyle Hagstrom and wife Anne and their children Alan Tyler, Gil, Caroline and Jon Gunnar all of Florida; his daughter Alison McNamara and husband Dennis and their children Alison Kate, Clare, Margaret and Connor all of Raleigh, N.C. He was predeceased by his sister Marcie Moore.

A memorial service will be held in the Trinity Congregational Church at a later date. Contributions may be made in Chip’s memory to a charity of one’s choice. Arrangements are by the Greely Funeral Home, 212 Washington Street, Gloucester, MA.

Richard B. Brady ’58

Richard B. Brady, 79, beloved husband of Irene T. Brady, passed away due to complications of lung cancer on March 18, 2019. Dick was the son of John F. and Gertrude (Clifford) Brady, and was born on August 15, 1939 in Hartford, Connecticut. A life-long resident of West Hartford, he was a man of strong faith in God and known for his humor. He loved golfing, fishing and boating and summers at Old Lyme Shores. A humble man and wonderful storyteller, he loved to ignite the imagination of others, including young children with his story of the “green hand.” Dick is survived by: his wife of 54 years, Irene; his sister, Gillian Hollister and her husband, Bob; his Four Bouys (the fond name of his boat): Christopher, Patrick, Peter and Kevin, and their spouses and significant others; and his four grandchildren he adored, Ryan, Caitlyn, Kathryn and Ayn, as well as many nieces and nephews. Dick was predeceased by his brother, Jack, and is survived by Jack’s wife Cathy. Friends may call at Molloy Funeral Home, 906 Farmington Avenue, West Hartford, on Sunday, March 24th from 2 pm until 5 pm. A Mass will be held on Monday, March 25th at 10 am at St. Thomas the Apostle Church, 872 Farmington Ave., West Hartford, CT 06119, followed by burial at Fairview Cemetery, 200 Whitman Avenue, West Hartford. In lieu of flowers, donations In Memory of Richard B. Brady may be made to the Smilow Cancer Hospital at the St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center (www.saintfrancisdonor.com) or the American Cancer Society (cancer.org). Online expressions of sympathy at www.molloyfuneralhome.com.
And, as Dick would say, “See ya around the globe.”

Alan B. Slawsby ’58

Alan Slawsby, age 79, of Wellesley, MA, formerly of Nashua, NH, passed away on Thursday, February 14, 2019. He is survived by his wife Lauri, son Alex and his wife Eli, and three granddaughters, Ava, Bree and Cameron. He is also survived by his sisters, Sheila Kowal and her husband Blake Chambliss and Karen Stone and her husband James and his sister-in-law, Jane Rosser and her husband Ken Vitale and their families. Alan retired in 2016 after 34 years in residential property management. He is a graduate of Williston Academy and Cornell University, AB ’62. Alan was also a member of the Ancient York Masonic Lodge No. 89 of Nashua, NH for 56 years, as well as a 32nd degree Mason. Alan served as Treasurer and on the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the Meadowbrook School of Weston in the 1980s. Funeral Services will be at Temple Beth Elohim, 10 Bethel Road, Wellesley on Sunday, February 17 at 10:30 am. Interment to follow at Crawford Street Memorial Park, 776 Baker Street, West Roxbury. Donations in Alan’s memory may be made to the MGH Cancer Center c/o Dr. Inge Lennes, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02214.

John P. Ossolinski ’58

John Paul Ossolinski, 78, passed away in Bradenton, FL on September 30, 2018. He grew up in Chicopee, MA and was the son of Matthew and Anna (Stawarz) Ossolinski. John is survived by his wife Patricia Daugherty, son Robert Ossolinski, daughter Christine Hollins, brother Richard Ossolinski, and three grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his first wife, Patricia Janik Ossolinski. John was a graduate of Williston Academy, Bowdoin College, and Wharton Business School. His friendships with classmates from all three schools brought him much joy. In retirement, John enjoyed traveling and attending family reunions with his wife, whose family embraced him.

A service was held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, October 13, 2018, at Spring Hill Funeral Home & Cemetery in Nashville, TN. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the American Cancer Society or a charity of your choice.