Tag Archives: Class of 1958

Stephan M. Heider ’58

Stephan Moore Heider was born in Northampton, Massachusetts on March 24, 1940, and was raised in Lawrence, Kansas. His parents, Fritz and Grace Heider, taught psychology at the University of Kansas for many years. The family also included oldest brother Karl, middle brother John, and the English Springer Spaniel Tony.

Steve was always fascinated with electricity, and according to his mother, explored the electrical plugs at an early age. At Pinkney grammar school he built an intercom and then a lighting board for the high school theatre. As he grew up, he bought World War II surplus parts and built his own radios and other devices. He got his Ham radio license (WØLUB) when was he was 12. (In later years, he was very proud to be a member of the Quarter Century Wireless Association.)

After high school, Steve selected physics as career path, and did his undergraduate work both domestically and abroad, in Durham, England. Along with his course work, he continued his independent exploration of applied technology, and at the University of Minnesota, he worked at the same radio station as Garrison Keillor.

Steve first came to Buffalo when he was accepted to the University at Buffalo (UB) doctorate program in physics in 1966. He dreamed of having computer analytics when memory was 4 kilowords in a Data General early computer. Building his equipment from scratch took time but resulted in several papers in atomic physics. After graduating in 1976, he left to go to Pittsburgh to work on computerizing mass spectrometers.

When Steve returned to Buffalo in 1978, he worked at the UB Physics Department and then choose to be an Independent consultant. He helped a number of businesses, including General Electric, computerize their equipment for data analytics. Steve felt strongly about keeping people employed using technology and not taking jobs away through automation.

Steve met future wife Arvela at the UB Flint loop bus stop in 1979. After getting their marriage license in Niagara Falls, they went to a Chinese restaurant and fortunately found out their zodiac signs were compatible. Steve married Arvela on May 7, 1983. They bought a “fixer upper” house in 1984 and enjoyed working on making it into a wonderful home.

Steve and Arvela’s 37-year marriage was a joyful partnership founded on intellectual curiosity and exploration. They built a business, Holark Systems—a collaboration from the name to the work itself. Their life together was also filled with many trips to science museums in the US, England, Europe, and even Australia. At home, their bookcases were lined with books on all subjects, and Steve remarked how he would read the titles and the books would reach out and grab him. Breakfasts were often delayed by a delightful read.

He was much beloved by his nieces and nephews. They (and their children) also brought great joy into his life. At almost two, the very youngest great-niece shows a desire to explore the world around her much the way Steve did all of his life.

Steve loved parties and we are planning on bringing family and friends together in the summer to share memories.

G. Arthur Padmore, Jr. ’58

George Arthur Padmore, Jr. was born in Monrovia, Liberia on January 12, 1940. He was the oldest of five sons born to Edith Mai Wiles Padmore and George Arthur Padmore, Sr.: Arthur, Ed, Gerald, Ronnie, and James “Wiki”.
When Arthur was still a young boy, his parents left him in Monrovia in the care of “Gran and Grampa” Euphemia and Edwin Barclay, while they went to Harbel to plant a newly acquired farm for Grampa Edwin Barclay. It was likely the influence of Grampa, an accomplished composer and musician, who was then serving as the 18th President of Liberia, that Arthur first developed his musical ear and lifelong love of music. It was also through the influence of Grampa Edwin Barclay, who introduced Arthur to the encyclopedia, that Arthur developed a lifelong love of learning.
Arthur grew up in the Barclay household with cousins Mary, Siata, and Earnest, and later also with Gran and Grampa Wiles at 99 Broad Street with cousins, Maakai (Sirleaf), Nehsee (Tubman), Myrna (Tolbert), Emmett Harmon, James (Wiles) and other relatives, as well as brothers Ed and Gerald. He attended St. Patrick’s Elementary School in Monrovia and then later attended high school at the College of West Africa (CWA). He left CWA in 1956 when his father was appointed Liberian Ambassador to the United States, and the entire family moved to Washington, D.C.
He graduated from The Williston Academy (now Williston Northampton School) in Easthampton, Massachusetts and matriculated to Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island and lived at Harkness House, where he made lifelong friends like John “Hoss” Frank and Carl Wattenberg. He was accepted into Boston University School of Law but later returned to Liberia where he received his law degree from the University of Liberia.
In 1965, he married Pairlene Eleanor Thomas and they had three daughters: Dawn Mai, Shirley (Mensah), and Soenda (Norman). A true disciple of cool jazz and pretty much everything else that went along with that genre of music, Arthur enjoyed his young adult years as a member of Monrovia’s Crowd 18 and as co-founder of “The WAVE.” A popular nightclub in Monrovia at the time, “The WAVE” was an acronym for co-founders “Winston (Richards), Arthur (Padmore), Varsay (Sirleaf) and Estrada (Bernard),” a name coined by Pairlene. Arthur also hosted the popular jazz radio show, “Music for Moderns,” which introduced many Liberians to jazz. Arthur and Pairlene’s home in Monrovia was often filled with friends, family, and music.
As a young father and husband, Arthur worked as hard as he played. He was General Manager of Liberia Amusements Limited which owned and operated popular
Monrovia movie theaters like the Relda among others. He also ran a law practice and branched out into various enterprises including a video rental business and gift shop.
Like so many Liberians, Arthur’s life as he knew it was upended by the military coup in April 1980. The friendships Arthur developed and maintained during his years in America paid off. For example, his longtime friend from Brown, John Frank, took in his two eldest girls to give Arthur and Pairlene time to settle. The family eventually settled in Wilmington, Delaware, where Arthur’s first cousin, Emmett Harmon, lived with his family.
Although things were not always easy, Arthur decided to make the best of his new life. He took a job selling insurance and he and Pairlene became dedicated members of the Cathedral Church of St. John, where he was eventually named senior warden. He also worked closely with the Liberian Association of Delaware, aiding those in need in Liberia.
Arthur also served as an administrative law judge for the Delaware Public Utilities Commission for fifteen years. In 2001, he was appointed by the Governor of Delaware to serve as the Public Advocate for the State of Delaware. In that role, he advocated on behalf of all consumers of regulated utility services such as gas, electric, water, and cable.
In the thirty-plus years he lived in Wilmington, Arthur took on the role of family elder. He spent countless hours curating and documenting the histories of the Barclay, Grimes, Padmore and Wiles families, using a computer program on Ancestry.com which at that time was in its infancy. He took great pleasure sharing the family history with all his extended family at family reunions and other gatherings.
In 2010, Arthur retired as Public Advocate and later moved with Pairlene to Cary, North Carolina to be closer to youngest daughter, Soenda, son-in-law, Carnley Norman, and grandchildren, Laura and Eleanor. They left countless friends and cherished memories in Wilmington.
After years of working hard and raising their family, Arthur and Pairlene were lucky to enjoy their respective retirements. They often traveled to St. Louis, Missouri to spend time with middle daughter, Shirley, her husband Paul, and granddaughters Olivia and Ava. Arthur was especially proud of the fact that he was present for Ava’s birth and often noted hers was the first birth he ever witnessed.
They visited daughter number one, Dawn (“Maisie”), in New York and never missed her performances as a classically trained Soprano. Arthur and Pairlene also traveled elsewhere within the United States to visit family and friends and often, together with friends and family, traveled to Europe, the Caribbean, China, and other far flung
places. They even invested in a small condominium in the Dominican Republic where they learned Spanish and how to dance Salsa. They continued to make friends along the way.
Their many travels were interrupted when Arthur developed a medical condition that led to episodic, but severe, illness. He eventually underwent surgery to address the condition. Unfortunately, complications from the surgery led to even greater health challenges. Over the past two years, Arthur valiantly faced every medical challenge that came his way (and there were many including total loss of vision). Throughout all of those challenges, his “Bride” of 55 years remained steadfastly by his side, caring for him with support from his daughters, his brother, Gerald, aunties, cousins, nieces, nephews, and many friends.
He died peacefully in the early morning hours of January 7, 2021, surrounded by his wife and his three daughters. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, his three daughters and sons-in-law, his four granddaughters, siblings, aunts, cousins, nieces, nephews and scores of other family and friends. He will be sorely missed by all who knew and loved him.

A. Michael Saaf ’58

Allen Michael Saaf, age 80, passed away peacefully on June 1, 2020 at Hospice of Dayton located in Ohio. He was the son of the late Allen E. Saaf and Marguerite K. Saaf, of New Canaan. Known to most as Mike, he was raised and lived in New Canaan for the first 60 years of his life. Mike attended New Canaan schools, Williston Northampton School and Hobart College. He spent many years working in New York for J. Walter Thompson, American Home Products, Uniroyal Tires, and Manoff Advertising. Mike then shifted to Real Estate by taking over the family business, Saaf Realtors, located in New Canaan. He was as an active member in various groups including Roton Point Beach Club, Ox Ridge Hunt Club (Polo Captain and New England Champion), Rombout Hunt Club, Lions Club, Men’s Club, New Canaan Bridle Path Association, YMCA Health Club, and New Canaan Indoor Tennis Club. He was a longtime supporter of the local Town Players and in 1952 took the stage himself in the show “Life with Father.” An equestrian enthusiast, Mike could be found riding in local and regional horse shows, as well as an avid participant in various fox hunts. Mike’s love of the outdoors was apparent from his passion for sailing, swimming, bike riding, and skiing. In early 2000, he moved to Fort Lauderdale and joined a local real estate brokerage while spending his days swimming in the ocean or riding his bike. He is survived by his former wife Barbara Bonham also of New Canaan with whom he had three children: Shelly Saaf and husband John Talk of Southern Pines, North Carolina and their 5 children, Jason and wife Denise Saaf of Portland, Maine and their 1 child, and Jennifer and husband Chris Hudson of Yellow Springs, Ohio with 2 adult children; as well as 1 great-grandchild. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Hospice of Dayton and the Greene County ASPCA.

Alan Hagstrom ’58

Alan “Chip” Hagstrom, 81, beloved husband of Grace C. (Callahan) Hagstrom, of Rockport, MA, passed away on Sunday morning, April 5, 2020.

Born in Gloucester on July 16, 1938, he was son of the late Edward and Ruth (Currier) Hagstrom. Chip was a graduate of Gloucester High School where he was a standout baseball and basketball player. He attended Williston Academy in Easthampton and played on the school’s soccer and tennis team. He went on to graduate from Boston University with his Bachelor’s degree in business administration. He was also a four year member of the BU crew team. After college, Chip had served in the U.S. National Guard.

Chip worked in the family business with his father Edward and his uncle George in the Hagstrom Construction Co. which he ran for many years and became well known on Cape Ann for his meticulous work. He later built and operated the Captain’s Lodge on Eastern Avenue where he also ran a coffee and sandwich shop, frequented not only by his lodgers but many family friends. In later years, Chip ran the buses for the Rockport school system.

Throughout his life, Chip remained very active in the community having served on the Board of Directors of Bank Gloucester for 39 years, longtime volunteer at Day by Day Adult Care, devout member of the Trinity Congregational Church and advocate for the YMCA. He was a member of the Economic Development Commission and was instrumental in the construction of the Blackburn Industrial Park. Chip was also an avid golfer and former member of the Bass Rocks Golf Club and Rockport Golf Club.

In addition to his wife Grace, he is survived by his son Alan Kyle Hagstrom and wife Anne and their children Alan Tyler, Gil, Caroline and Jon Gunnar all of Florida; his daughter Alison McNamara and husband Dennis and their children Alison Kate, Clare, Margaret and Connor all of Raleigh, N.C. He was predeceased by his sister Marcie Moore.

A memorial service will be held in the Trinity Congregational Church at a later date. Contributions may be made in Chip’s memory to a charity of one’s choice. Arrangements are by the Greely Funeral Home, 212 Washington Street, Gloucester, MA.

Richard B. Brady ’58

Richard B. Brady, 79, beloved husband of Irene T. Brady, passed away due to complications of lung cancer on March 18, 2019. Dick was the son of John F. and Gertrude (Clifford) Brady, and was born on August 15, 1939 in Hartford, Connecticut. A life-long resident of West Hartford, he was a man of strong faith in God and known for his humor. He loved golfing, fishing and boating and summers at Old Lyme Shores. A humble man and wonderful storyteller, he loved to ignite the imagination of others, including young children with his story of the “green hand.” Dick is survived by: his wife of 54 years, Irene; his sister, Gillian Hollister and her husband, Bob; his Four Bouys (the fond name of his boat): Christopher, Patrick, Peter and Kevin, and their spouses and significant others; and his four grandchildren he adored, Ryan, Caitlyn, Kathryn and Ayn, as well as many nieces and nephews. Dick was predeceased by his brother, Jack, and is survived by Jack’s wife Cathy. Friends may call at Molloy Funeral Home, 906 Farmington Avenue, West Hartford, on Sunday, March 24th from 2 pm until 5 pm. A Mass will be held on Monday, March 25th at 10 am at St. Thomas the Apostle Church, 872 Farmington Ave., West Hartford, CT 06119, followed by burial at Fairview Cemetery, 200 Whitman Avenue, West Hartford. In lieu of flowers, donations In Memory of Richard B. Brady may be made to the Smilow Cancer Hospital at the St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center (www.saintfrancisdonor.com) or the American Cancer Society (cancer.org). Online expressions of sympathy at www.molloyfuneralhome.com.
And, as Dick would say, “See ya around the globe.”

Alan B. Slawsby ’58

Alan Slawsby, age 79, of Wellesley, MA, formerly of Nashua, NH, passed away on Thursday, February 14, 2019. He is survived by his wife Lauri, son Alex and his wife Eli, and three granddaughters, Ava, Bree and Cameron. He is also survived by his sisters, Sheila Kowal and her husband Blake Chambliss and Karen Stone and her husband James and his sister-in-law, Jane Rosser and her husband Ken Vitale and their families. Alan retired in 2016 after 34 years in residential property management. He is a graduate of Williston Academy and Cornell University, AB ’62. Alan was also a member of the Ancient York Masonic Lodge No. 89 of Nashua, NH for 56 years, as well as a 32nd degree Mason. Alan served as Treasurer and on the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the Meadowbrook School of Weston in the 1980s. Funeral Services will be at Temple Beth Elohim, 10 Bethel Road, Wellesley on Sunday, February 17 at 10:30 am. Interment to follow at Crawford Street Memorial Park, 776 Baker Street, West Roxbury. Donations in Alan’s memory may be made to the MGH Cancer Center c/o Dr. Inge Lennes, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02214.

John P. Ossolinski ’58

John Paul Ossolinski, 78, passed away in Bradenton, FL on September 30, 2018. He grew up in Chicopee, MA and was the son of Matthew and Anna (Stawarz) Ossolinski. John is survived by his wife Patricia Daugherty, son Robert Ossolinski, daughter Christine Hollins, brother Richard Ossolinski, and three grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his first wife, Patricia Janik Ossolinski. John was a graduate of Williston Academy, Bowdoin College, and Wharton Business School. His friendships with classmates from all three schools brought him much joy. In retirement, John enjoyed traveling and attending family reunions with his wife, whose family embraced him.

A service was held at 2 p.m. on Saturday, October 13, 2018, at Spring Hill Funeral Home & Cemetery in Nashville, TN. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the American Cancer Society or a charity of your choice.

Eugene M. Pfeifer ’58

Eugene “Gene” Michael Pfeifer, Esq. died June 10, 2018 of pancreatic cancer at his home in Alexandria, VA in the company of his loving family. Born on May 17, 1940, Gene was predeceased by his second wife of 31 years Jill Bothwell Pfeifer, stepson Thomas Bothwell, sisters Anne and Teresa. He is survived by his children Chris Pfeifer (Daniela Spigai) and Laura Pfeifer (Edgar Fields), stepdaughter Maria Bothwell (Jeffery Kline), daughter-in-law Laurie Bothwell (Keith Burgess) and grandchildren Marc Blanch-Baldwin, Amelia Bothwell, Max Kline, Lily and Zane Pfeifer, Jackie Tilley, and a host of grieving family and friends. Gene was a graduate of Williston Academy 1958, Brown University 1962, and then moved to Alexandria, VA to attend Georgetown University Law Center, graduating in 1967. He enlisted in the National Guard while at law school and served 1962-64. While at Georgetown, he clerked for the first African American judge in DC and was an ardent civil rights activist, attending many marches and demonstrations in DC in the 1960’s. His children are inspired by his sense of civic duty. Gene was well and widely read. He always had a book in hand. His penetrating intellect made him a formidable conversationalist enhanced by a dry sense of humor. A marvelous raconteur and bon vivant, Gene enjoyed travel; when his children were young, Gene and his first wife Debbie Baldwin pulled their kids out of school for a year-long road trip across The United States and Mexico in a van he had converted. Gene’s children, Chris and Laura, forever grateful, remember this as their most profound education and a life changing experience. He was quite the adventurer. His love of sailing started as a child growing up in New England. Summers on the water at a young age seeded his passion for sailing that lives on in his grandson Max. On land, he loved to bike. He rode 100 miles in 2014 and 2015 for Bike to the Beach for Autism. Sports were a big part of his life. He was a gymnast, played hockey for Brown, and skied every winter. Gene loved his family and in his last year, he did not shy away from telling his children how proud he was of them and his grandchildren. He left comforted by knowing he had passed on his values, morals, and integrity to his children and grandchildren. Generous of spirit, Gene was a wonderful grandfather and could often be found undertaking projects with the grandchildren including building a playhouse and tubing behind the Grady White in Easton. Gene had a remarkable legal career rooted first at the Food and Drug Administration. He was a law partner at King & Spalding in Washington DC and prior to that was a law partner at Burditt, Bowles & Radzius. Among his many accomplishments, Gene was a major participant in the development of the Drug Price Competition and Patent Term Restoration Act of 1984. He provided regulatory advice and representation on a wide variety of FDA, FTC, and DEA regulated activities, including product approval and compliance issues. Prior to his law firm work, Gene served for a year in the General Counsel’s office of the Federal Trade Commission, where he represented the FTC in Federal Court to enjoin violations of the Federal Trade Commission Act. He had served ten years in the Chief Counsel’s Office at the FDA as Associate Chief Counsel for Enforcement, Associate Chief Counsel for Drugs, and Deputy Chief Counsel for Regulations and Hearings. During his tenure at the FDA, he was the FDA’s lead litigator and Appellate Court advocate, and he briefed six major FDA cases before the Supreme Court. He was an active volunteer professionally and personally, serving on the board of Elite Pharmaceuticals, and as volunteer at Habitat for Humanity in Easton, MD.

Helen Haase Tompkins ’58

Helen Elizabeth Tompkins, 75, of Ellenton, FL passed away on April 23, 2015. She was the widow of Thomas H. Tompkins and is survived by her sons; Thomas H. and Ronald L. (Sherry) of Florida. Also surviving are grandsons; Christopher (Abby) and Dylan as well as her precious great-granddaughter, Arya Lynn Tompkins, all of Coldwater, Michigan. Additionally, Helen leaves her sister, Mary (David) of Tampa and her brother, Bill (Nancy) of Pennsylvania as well as four nieces and nephews and their families.

Charles F. Lyons ’58

Charles Francis Lyons, 77, of North Elm Street, passed away Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016, at Cooley Dickinson Hospital.

Born Nov. 17, 1939, at the same hospital, he was the son of the late Francis and Nora (Crane) Lyons. He graduated from Williston School and Columbia University, where he became president of the Sigma Chi fraternity and a member of the Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps. Charlie would meet the love of his life, Susette DuPuy, while working as head waiter in the dining room of Columbia’s graduate dormitory.

After graduation, Charlie served in the Navy as a Lieutenant JG on the USS Bellatrix. Upon completing his naval service, he married his beloved Susette in 1964, and the newlyweds returned to Charlie’s hometown where he worked as a chartered life underwriter at the family-owned Francis P. Lyons Insurance Agency on King Street. He later sold the agency in the early 1980’s and became a commercial real estate developer in both Northampton and Springfield. Charlie transformed several buildings in the area into vibrant places for business and veteran’s services, including the Todd’s Department Store building on Main Street.

Charlie was an active figure in Northampton’s civic and business communities. He was instrumental in creating the Northampton Recycling Center on Locust Street, served as president of the Northampton Rotary Club, was an active member of the Elks Lodge, and served on the boards of numerous local institutions, including the Chamber of Commerce. His last project was helping to donate a new boat launch for the Northampton Rowing Club in honor of his late brother Thomas.

He leaves his wife Susette; sons Matthew of New York City, and Michael of Peoria, Arizona; grandchildren Isabel, Jake and Chloe; nephew Marc of Ludlow; and niece, Margot of Isle de Capri, Florida.