Tag Archives: Williston Academy

Paul W. Stasz ’65

Paul William Stasz of Vancouver, Washington died
on November 2, 2020. Born on May 30, 1947 in Northampton, Massachusetts, Paul was the son of the late Edmund and Carol (Baldyga) Stasz of Southampton where he attended the local grammar schools. He graduated from Williston Academy (now the Williston Northampton School) in 1965 where he was an outstanding swimmer on the Williston championship team. He graduated from Dickinson College in 1968 where he was a leading member of the swim team.
He had a decades long and successful career in risk management, first for Syracuse University, then for Borden Corporation, International Paper Company and Icahn Enterprises from which he retired in 2017. In his retirement he enjoyed maple sugaring at the home of his sister-in-law Bird Stasz Jones in Weybridge, Vermont. He also volunteered maintaining public gardens and trees in Vancouver.
He leaves daughters Emily Morgan and Eleanor Hanna of Syracuse, New York; his son Phillip Stasz of Keizer, Oregon; his fraternal twin brother Peter Stasz ’65 of Holyoke, Massachusetts; his brother Edmund Stasz Jr. of Southampton, Massachusetts; his former spouse Marisa Arezzi Stasz of Hillsdale, New Jersey; three grandchildren; a niece Megan Stasz of Maine; a nephew Jeffrey Stasz of South Carolina; a sister-in-law Bird Stasz Jones of Weybridge, Vermont, and many cousins. He is predeceased by his brothers Gregory ’68 and Thomas Stasz ’67.
Paul donated his organs and body to medical science therefore there will not be a funeral. Memorial services in several locales will be announced at a later date.
Donations may be made to the Williston Northampton School Class of 1965 Scholarship Fund or any other scholarship fund at the Williston Northampton School, 19 Payson Avenue, Easthampton, MA 01027. Donations may also be made online at www.williston.com/give. Please mark donations to be used for scholarships only.

Joseph C. Stevens ’49

Joseph Chauncy Stevens, MD, of Hanover, NH, died on October 5, 2020, after a short illness. He was 89. He was born in West Springfield, MA. Joe attended public school until the 10th grade, then went on to Williston Academy, Yale, Union Theological Seminary, and the U.S. Air Force. While in the Air Force, he met the love of his life, Jane Rita Wurtz, on a blind date. They married and returned to Yale to prepare for medical school.

Joe and Jane then moved to St. Louis where Joe attended Washington University Medical School. During medical school Joe and Jane welcomed all three of their daughters: Barbara, Mary and Susie. Joe completed his urology residency at Dartmouth/Mary Hitchcock Memorial Hospital and, after several years of urology practice in Madison, Wisconsin, Jane, Joe and the girls settled in Hanover, NH, where Joe continued his career as a urologist at Mary Hitchcock Hospital. Joe then opened a private practice in Claremont, NH, and Springfield, VT.

During Joe’s years practicing urology he commuted from Hanover to Claremont and Springfield. He was always on call and made the trip even in the worst kind of weather and in the middle of the night. Often in a hurry to get to the hospital, he was well known by the State Troopers patrolling I-91. He loved being a doctor and a surgeon, and remembered every single patient.

When Joe wasn’t working, he was focused on his family, friends, and his wide array of interests. He and Jane played tennis and golf regularly with many good friends. Although Joe liked to joke that he “flew a desk” in the Air Force, he later became an actual pilot and loved to fly Cessna’s and gliders in the sky above New England. At 54, Joe decided to become a runner, and ran his first (and only) marathon at 54. He loved opera, had a curious mind and was always interested in doing and learning new things. He took Spanish lessons, grew hydroponic tomatoes (in the living room), studied astronomy, wine, geology, and James Joyce. One summer he even tried his hand at raising sheep. He was a gifted painter, wood carver, and metal worker.

Joe developed and fostered wonderful friendships that he treasured until the last days of his life. In fact, he recently said that being a good friend was one of his greatest achievements.

Joe heartily supported those in need and the institutions that inspired him. He was an early supporter of the Montshire Museum when it was housed in an old bowling alley in Hanover, and was instrumental in its expansion to Norwich, VT, where he served as a trustee. He was an active supporter of Opera North, stayed involved in his high school alma mater, Williston Northampton. In more recent years, Joe renewed his spiritual life and became active in St. Thomas Episcopal Church.

Above all, Joe was interested in people. If he met you, he wanted to know you. If he knew you, he was always happy to see you.

Joe’s generous spirit and jovial presence and will be missed and well remembered by all those who were lucky enough to cross his path.

His beloved wife, Jane, died in December of 2019. Joe is survived by his three daughters, Barbara Lucy Stevens ’76, of Key West, Florida, Mary Stevens (Michael Whitaker) of Norwich, VT, and Susie Stevens (Vince Watts) of Norwich, VT, and his brother Aaron Stevens ’45 of Ft. Meyers, FL. He was predeceased by his sister, Drucilla (Stevens) Mazur ’47. Joe was especially loved by all of his grandchildren. He made special time for each of them and they all have favorite Papa stories to tell. They include Sam and Henry Freel, Isabella Ackerman, Jordan ’17 and Joe Sansone ’15, and Jackson Watts.

Due to COVID-19, services for Joe will be held at a later date.

Joseph J. Deliso Jr. ’65

Joseph John Deliso, Jr., 73, died peacefully, September 24, 2020, surrounded by his loving family. Born in Springfield, he was the son of the late Joseph J. and Jennie (Ambrosino) Deliso, Sr.
After having attended Williston Academy he majored in French and Art History at Columbia University. After leaving Columbia, he travelled extensively, including a memorable trip through Spain and down into Africa, where he hitched across the Sahara and through Mali down to the Ivory Coast. From there he moved first to Italy, where he met Elizabeth Fort, then to France. He and Elizabeth were very good friends for fifteen years, during which time Joseph, by then an established Teacher of English as a Foreign Language, returned to the U.S. to complete two master’s degrees at Columbia. He continued to teach, and produced a well-reviewed English as a foreign language teaching method which was published by Longmans. He and Elizabeth eventually deepened their relationship and settled in Provence, where they married in 1999.
They raised their two children there while building and running a successful inn, called Les Olivettes, in the village of Lourmarin, in Provence. Joseph was a visionary, and his taste and determination proved invaluable in creating an extraordinary, welcoming haven. In his spare time, he enjoyed sculpting bone china, riding his bicycle, harvesting his olives and hanging out with guests, friends and family. He became passionate about the wines of Southern France, and he and Elizabeth shared a taste for French cuisine. French, which Joseph had learned from his beloved Québecoise stepmother, was the family language, and Joseph was an unusually fluent, accent-less French speaker. He cultivated his long-standing friendships with his French friends and Elizabeth’s family. He loved his family deeply. They enjoyed many exciting trips together, across Europe, to the Caribbean and to Africa.
Joseph will be dearly missed by his wife, Elizabeth Fort DeLiso, their children, Claire and Pierre ’13, his brother, Clement ’50, his sister, Virginia and husband Van Govoni, and many cousins, nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his brother, Pascal, and sister, Rosalie.
Joseph’s life was celebrated in a private service. Memorial contributions may be made to: The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration at www.TheAFTD.org or AFTD, 2700 Horizon Dr., Ste 120, King of Prussia, PA 19406.

Theodore D. Kurrus ’53

Theodore Dudley Kurrus, 86, passed away on Sept. 12, 2020. Ted was born in Mt. Kisco, New York, to Doris Dudley and Theodore Hornby Kurrus.

Ted’s youth was peppered with attendance at a dozen boarding schools, including Williston-Northampton School, Massachusetts, where in 2013 he was inducted into the Williston Hall of Fame for swimming. Following high school he attended Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, where he graduated with a BA in Economics and a minor in English in 1957. Continuing his swimming talents in college, Ted was recognized by his alma mater in 1997 with induction into the Kenyon Hall of Fame for his swimming and diving achievements.

After college, Ted began a worldwide photo-journalism career, which led him to 68 countries and a nomination for a Pulitzer Prize in journalism. His writings appeared in a wide variety of international publications.

In 1959, he worked for Chicago’s United Press International and later move to the Indianapolis Bureau. From there, Ted set sail for Hawaii where he joined the Honolulu Advertiser in 1961 as general assignment reporter, and later transferred to the Honolulu Star-Bulletin. He worked on special assignment for United Press International while in Hawaii covering the summer Olympic team in Tokyo and winter Olympics in Innsbruck 1964. Afterward, he ran his own freelance agency in Hawaii in the famed Treehouse at International Market Place, Waikiki. His career path led him to employment in Hong Kong as Associate Editor of Asian Business and Industry Magazine.

Ted was the first member of the Western press corps to enter the Citadel Proper (near Hue) on Sept. 16, 1972, where he photographed the initial raising of the colors of the Republic of Vietnam over the Main Gate of the Citadel at Quang Tri, which was considered the Iwo Jima for the Vietnam War. The U.S. Marine Corps gave him a commendation acknowledging “personal courage, unlimited ability and noteworthy dedication to the fundamental concept of full and accurate press coverage of the event.”

After Vietnam, he joined the Dallas Morning News, where he developed a great interest of China (PRC). He began interpreting whatever events could be seen through that country’s “bamboo keyhole.” And in 1976, he had the opportunity to visit the PRC as one of only three American-based journalists invited to report on the semi-annual Kwangechow Export Commodities Fair. The six-part series attracted the attention of China watchers in the USA and overseas.

In the late ’70s, he managed worldwide communications for Rockwell International based in Dallas, Texas.

He returned to Hawaii in the early ’80s and continued his life of writing and sailing. In 1990, he and his wife, Rita Mae, semi-retired to Seaside, Oregon, where they opened Rita Mae’s Great Little Bed & Breakfast and Rita Mae’s Great Little Wine Haus & Deli Pub. In 1993, they fully retired to Green Valley, Arizona.

Ted’s passion for the sea led to a peregrination around the world. In Hawaii, he pursued his mariner passions with membership in Kaneohe Yacht Club. His boats, Harmattan II and Summer notched many cup victories. He shared his love of the sea with his family. While Ted was an aficionado of all sports, the Chicago Cubs were his favorite and their winning of the 2016 World Series was a dream come true.

Ted lived life large. Artist, cartoonist, poet, golfer, Life Master bridge player, were a few of the hats he wore. He filled his life with the talent he was given to the fullest.

Ted is survived by his wife of 38 years, Rita Mae; son David Kurrus; daughter Kimberly Kurrus (grandchildren Jamie and Aaron); son Alexander (wife Stephanie) Kurrus (grandchildren Matthew, Steven, Chase, Alexis, Austin); daughter Kristina (husband Chris) Pagnotta (grandchildren Zachary and Nicholas); stepson Christopher (wife Maria) Spelleri (grandchildren Robert and Anna).

Preceded in death by two brothers, Jack “Butch” Jenkins and Thomas Kurrus. Survived by his brother, Theo (wife Susan) Kurrus, New Smyrna Beach, Florida; and sister, Jo Ann Kurrus-Emory, Houston, Texas.

A private Mass will be held at Our Lady of the Valley in Green Valley. Donations in Ted’s memory may be made to St. Jude’s Hospital, Hawaii Special Olympics or Green Valley Fire District.

William D. Clark Jr. ’53

William “Bill” Clark Jr. of South Windsor, CT, formerly of Enfield and East Windsor, died on September 5, 2020 at Saint Francis Hospital. Bill was born in New Haven on December 18, 1934, to the late William Clark Sr. and Gertrude (Stocking) Clark. Most of his youth was spent in Windsor. He went to junior and senior high at Williston Academy (now known as the Williston Northampton School) and graduated in 1953. He graduated from Bates College in 1957 and then served in the Army Reserves. Bill was an English teacher at East Windsor High School for 23 years and then ran a computer lab there for 12 years. He retired from the school system in 1994. After a few months, he joined the IT department at the Dexter Company (now known as Ahlstrom) in Windsor Locks. He retired from Ahlstrom in 2005.
Bill was kind, gentle and generous. His brother-in-law, Dick Kowalsky, wrote a beautiful reflection of Bill’s life which says a great deal about him: “Bill could be a quiet sort of guy. I noticed that he used his ears more than his mouth. I’d say, a good example for us all. One of his passions was minerals, especially those which were rare or had a gem-like quality. Besides being a rockhound, Bill was a hound for life. He was interested in many things but spent a great amount of energy as a family man and high school teacher where he spent much of his professional life. Bill had a special gift for relating to young people and had a positive impact on many of them. Many times, as I walked in town with him, we would encounter someone who knew him, several were former students. I was always amazed at how well-known Bill was in the community. Bill’s love for minerals led him to learn how to make fine jewelry and he and Evelyn had a jewelry business for several years. His creative eye also was expressed in photography. His photos exhibited fine composition and were exhibited throughout his home. He had a zest for food and when he was not in his craft shop, he could be found in the kitchen making wonderful daily meals for his family and guests. His son, Billy, is carrying on the culinary talent. Bill could turn prose into poetry. When I read some of his work, I experienced many emotions, a sign of his gift to see the world in ways unseen by others yet touching senses I could identify with. Beyond his personal interests, Bill had an abiding passion for social justice. Along with Evelyn, he was quick to become involved with local and international issues. Once when they were visiting my family in North Carolina, we told them about a local protest regarding a job-related issue associated with the father of a friend. They immediately said, ‘Let’s go support that.’ Bill’s focus on the needs and concerns of others was a good example for everyone. Bill made the best of life as a son, husband, father, grandfather, and friend to many people. He loved everyone and left the world a better place because he lived in it. God speed Bill. It was great to know you.”
Bill was compiling his writing into a book when he became ill. His daughter, Marie will complete it for him. Bill is survived by his wife of almost 62 years, Evelyn (Vezina) Clark of South Windsor; daughter, Marie Clark of South Windsor; son, William Clark III of Hamburg, New Jersey; granddaughters, Leidi Clark and Flor Clark of South Windsor. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at Saint Patrick – Saint Anthony Church, 285 Church St., Hartford, on Saturday, September 19, at 10:30 a.m. Please observe Covid 19 precautions. The funeral mass will also be live-streamed. You may use the following link: https://venue.streamspot.com/event/MjMzJDAyMQ
Burial will be private. Ample free parking is available in the Saints’ Lot across the street from the church. Memorial donations may be made to Doctors Without Borders, P.O. Box 5030, Hagerstown, MD 21741, or online: donate.doctorswithoutborders.org.; or Franciscan Center for Urban Ministry, 285 Church St., Hartford, CT.

Lawrence H. Herzig ’56


Lawrence H. Herzig (U.S. Army Ret.), 84, of Castle Pines, CO, died Friday, August 14, 2020, at Legacy Village of Castle Pines with family by his side.

Larry is survived by his wife of 44 years, Joan (Pellerin) Herzig; a daughter, Catherine (Herzig) Crowley and her husband Ralph of Leominster, MA; a son, Philip Herzig and his wife Holly of Mesa, AZ; a sister, Linda (Herzig) de Laveaga, of Star, ID; two stepsons, Rob Matson and his wife Elizabeth of Castle Rock, and Glenn Matson and his wife Stephanie of Las Vegas, NV; a stepdaughter, Elizabeth Van Vechten and her husband Brian of Castle Rock; 14 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren; a niece and a nephew; and his dog, Lexi. He was predeceased by his father, Elgin Herzig, in 1973; his mother, Doris (Reynolds) Herzig, in 1974; and his brother, Russell Herzig, in 2013.

Larry was born to Elgin and Doris of Pittsfield, MA, in 1936. Before graduating from Pittsfield High School in 1954, Larry was a two-time all-Berkshire and all-Western Massachusetts guard in football, a standout sprinter and shot-putter in track and field, a top-ranked speedskater, and a letterman in hockey and baseball. He attended prep school at Williston Academy in Easthampton from 1954 to 1955, where he again starred on the gridiron, on the track, and in the pit. He attended Stetson University in Deland, FL, from 1955 to 1956, where he played fullback until a knee injury ended his playing days. He would later earn his associate’s degree from Mt. Wachusett Community College in Gardner, MA.

Larry enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1958, attending basic training at Fort Dix, NJ. After several years in the enlisted ranks, he entered the warrant officer ranks after earning his aviator wings as a helicopter pilot. He would serve two tours in Vietnam, flying Hueys his first tour and Cobras his second. His awards included the Bronze Star, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal with “V” device, the Air Medal with 32nd award, and the Army Commendation Medal with second Oak Leaf Cluster. He would also receive a Purple Heart. His tours of duty included France, Texas, Massachusetts, then-West Germany, Hawai’i, and eventually Colorado, where he would retire from the service in 1984 with more than 26 years of steadfast service.

Thereafter, he worked mostly as an independent contractor until 2015. Larry was an avid reader who enjoyed golfing, bowling, crossword puzzles, painting, music, travelling, playing with his family members, testing his vast knowledge during Jeopardy, and rooting for the New England Patriots. He was intelligent, articulate, witty, selfless, and the epitome of a patriot. Above all, he was a devoted family man, a loyal son and brother, and a trustworthy friend who will be missed immensely.

Upcoming Events Graveside Aug 27. 2:30 PM (MST) Ft. Logan National Cemetery 4400 West Kenyon Avenue Denver, CO, 80236

Steven S. Allen ’71

Steven S. Allen, age 66, passed away on Tuesday, July 28, 2020, at University Hospital and Clinics in Lafayette, LA. At the request of family, private Inurnment will follow at a later date in Oakwood Cemetery in Syracuse, NY. Steven, affectionately known as “Steve”, was born on August 17, 1953, in Syracuse, NY and was a long-time resident of Acadiana. Steve attended Cazenovia High School in Cazenovia, NY and Williston Academy in Easthampton, MA. He earned a bachelor’s degree at the State University of New York at Oneonta. Steve worked in sales and installation in the home tile-flooring industry for many years. He attended the First United Methodist Church in Lafayette. Steve was Cajun music’s biggest fan and loved to dance. He was very fond of animals, especially his pet cats. Most of all, Steve loved to spend time with his friends and family and will be very deeply missed. Steve is survived by three siblings, his two sisters, Lindy McMahon and her husband Richard, of Stowe, VT and Becky Rizzi and her husband Joseph, of West Rutland, VT and one brother, William Allen, Jr., of Killington, VT as well as numerous nieces, nephews, grandnieces, grandnephews and dear friends. He was preceded in death by his parents, William Miller Allen and Doreen Ynez Lukeman Allen. The family wishes to thank the doctors and nurses at University Hospital and Clinics for the compassionate care given to Steve and his family. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made in Steve’s name to the First United Methodist Church at 703 Lee Ave., Lafayette, LA 70501.

Christopher R. Lowell ’60

Christopher Richard Lowell, beloved husband, daddy, step-dad, teacher, student, historian, mentor, adviser, friend, linguist, drummer, chef, Francophile, ham, mensch, actor, director, and international performer took his final bow on Bastille Day, July 14, 2020.

Born October 11, 1942 in New York City to parents Richard and Norma, he studied French and theatre, earning degrees from Dickinson College and Colgate University. Lifelong scholar, teacher, and actor, Chris mentored countless students and actors.

In his last fifteen years, he brought the life, philosophy, wit, and accomplishments of Benjamin Franklin to audiences across the United States and France. Chris’ interwoven passions for France, theatre, history, and language arose from a deep affection, a fascination, for people. While his passions drove him to pursue excellence in every undertaking, his deeply humanist side was what made him a generous actor-director, careful and insightful historian, and beloved teacher and mentor, well beyond the collective forty-two years he spent on faculty at Cazenovia High School (Cazenovia, NY), Chestnut Hill Academy (Philadelphia, PA), Fountain Valley School of Colorado (Colorado Springs, CO), Lycee Amiral Ronac’h (Brest, France), Williston Northampton (Easthampton, MA), and the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs (Colorado Springs, CO).

He will be remembered for his quick wit, easy laugh, embrace of all things cultural, the quality of his relationships, and the intense personal presence he devoted to everyone, years after professional responsibility dictated. For those in his life, he forever offered his heart and house. Chris’ family will treasure the boundless love, inspiration, encouragement, support, and culinary delights he provided.

He will be greatly missed by all, especially by his surviving wife, Sue; his kids, Laura, Barbi, and Jennifer; his step-kids, Burton and Clara; and his nine grandkids.

A Celebration of Life will be held at a later date when an in-person gathering can offer more joy than risk.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in Chris’ memory may be made to the UCCS Theatreworks, Fountain Valley School of Colorado, or Pikes Peak Hospice Foundation.

Robert A. Alden ’50

Robert A. Alden, a Washington Post news and layout editor for 48 years who helped design the inside pages of the newspaper’s first section, died June 7, 2020 at his home in McLean, Va. He was 87.

The cause was complication from Alzheimer’s disease, his wife, Diane Alden, said.

Mr. Alden retired from The Post in 2000. His career included the design and layout of newspaper pages containing stories, photographs and headlines about happenings that ranged from routine procedures of local governing boards to airplane crashes, natural disasters and historic events including the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963 and the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon in 1974.

On busy nights, the page designs and layouts had to be changed several times to keep up with fast-breaking events.

Mr. Alden was also president of the National Press Club in 1976, and he was a co-founder of the National Press Foundation, which supports educational programs for journalists. He was among the early advocates of the admission of women to press-club membership, which came about in the 1970s.

Mr. Alden had lived in McLean since 1953 and saw it evolve from a rural community of dairy cows and farms into a bustling suburb of shops and expensive houses. He was a longtime civic activist who helped plan McLean’s downtown, including a park and community center. The 386-seat community theater is named in his honor.

Robert Ames Alden was born in Washington on Feb. 5, 1933, and he spent part of his childhood in Rocky River, Ohio. As a high school student, he worked part-time at the Cleveland Press from 1947 to 1951 as a writer and reporter.

Returning to Washington after high school, he was a statistician at the Office of Price Stabilization before joining The Post news staff in 1952.

While working at the paper, he attended George Washington University, where he received a bachelor’s degree in 1965 and a master’s degree in history in 1968.

In 1958, he married Diane Heidkamp. In addition to his wife, of McLean, survivors include four children, William Alden of Princeton, N.J., Thomas Alden of Manchester, Vt., Jennifer Alden of Chesterfield, Va., and Martha Alden of Reston, Va.; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.