Category Archives: 1950s

G. Arthur Padmore, Jr. ’58

George Arthur Padmore, Jr. was born in Monrovia, Liberia on January 12, 1940. He was the oldest of five sons born to Edith Mai Wiles Padmore and George Arthur Padmore, Sr.: Arthur, Ed, Gerald, Ronnie, and James “Wiki”.
When Arthur was still a young boy, his parents left him in Monrovia in the care of “Gran and Grampa” Euphemia and Edwin Barclay, while they went to Harbel to plant a newly acquired farm for Grampa Edwin Barclay. It was likely the influence of Grampa, an accomplished composer and musician, who was then serving as the 18th President of Liberia, that Arthur first developed his musical ear and lifelong love of music. It was also through the influence of Grampa Edwin Barclay, who introduced Arthur to the encyclopedia, that Arthur developed a lifelong love of learning.
Arthur grew up in the Barclay household with cousins Mary, Siata, and Earnest, and later also with Gran and Grampa Wiles at 99 Broad Street with cousins, Maakai (Sirleaf), Nehsee (Tubman), Myrna (Tolbert), Emmett Harmon, James (Wiles) and other relatives, as well as brothers Ed and Gerald. He attended St. Patrick’s Elementary School in Monrovia and then later attended high school at the College of West Africa (CWA). He left CWA in 1956 when his father was appointed Liberian Ambassador to the United States, and the entire family moved to Washington, D.C.
He graduated from The Williston Academy (now Williston Northampton School) in Easthampton, Massachusetts and matriculated to Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island and lived at Harkness House, where he made lifelong friends like John “Hoss” Frank and Carl Wattenberg. He was accepted into Boston University School of Law but later returned to Liberia where he received his law degree from the University of Liberia.
In 1965, he married Pairlene Eleanor Thomas and they had three daughters: Dawn Mai, Shirley (Mensah), and Soenda (Norman). A true disciple of cool jazz and pretty much everything else that went along with that genre of music, Arthur enjoyed his young adult years as a member of Monrovia’s Crowd 18 and as co-founder of “The WAVE.” A popular nightclub in Monrovia at the time, “The WAVE” was an acronym for co-founders “Winston (Richards), Arthur (Padmore), Varsay (Sirleaf) and Estrada (Bernard),” a name coined by Pairlene. Arthur also hosted the popular jazz radio show, “Music for Moderns,” which introduced many Liberians to jazz. Arthur and Pairlene’s home in Monrovia was often filled with friends, family, and music.
As a young father and husband, Arthur worked as hard as he played. He was General Manager of Liberia Amusements Limited which owned and operated popular
Monrovia movie theaters like the Relda among others. He also ran a law practice and branched out into various enterprises including a video rental business and gift shop.
Like so many Liberians, Arthur’s life as he knew it was upended by the military coup in April 1980. The friendships Arthur developed and maintained during his years in America paid off. For example, his longtime friend from Brown, John Frank, took in his two eldest girls to give Arthur and Pairlene time to settle. The family eventually settled in Wilmington, Delaware, where Arthur’s first cousin, Emmett Harmon, lived with his family.
Although things were not always easy, Arthur decided to make the best of his new life. He took a job selling insurance and he and Pairlene became dedicated members of the Cathedral Church of St. John, where he was eventually named senior warden. He also worked closely with the Liberian Association of Delaware, aiding those in need in Liberia.
Arthur also served as an administrative law judge for the Delaware Public Utilities Commission for fifteen years. In 2001, he was appointed by the Governor of Delaware to serve as the Public Advocate for the State of Delaware. In that role, he advocated on behalf of all consumers of regulated utility services such as gas, electric, water, and cable.
In the thirty-plus years he lived in Wilmington, Arthur took on the role of family elder. He spent countless hours curating and documenting the histories of the Barclay, Grimes, Padmore and Wiles families, using a computer program on Ancestry.com which at that time was in its infancy. He took great pleasure sharing the family history with all his extended family at family reunions and other gatherings.
In 2010, Arthur retired as Public Advocate and later moved with Pairlene to Cary, North Carolina to be closer to youngest daughter, Soenda, son-in-law, Carnley Norman, and grandchildren, Laura and Eleanor. They left countless friends and cherished memories in Wilmington.
After years of working hard and raising their family, Arthur and Pairlene were lucky to enjoy their respective retirements. They often traveled to St. Louis, Missouri to spend time with middle daughter, Shirley, her husband Paul, and granddaughters Olivia and Ava. Arthur was especially proud of the fact that he was present for Ava’s birth and often noted hers was the first birth he ever witnessed.
They visited daughter number one, Dawn (“Maisie”), in New York and never missed her performances as a classically trained Soprano. Arthur and Pairlene also traveled elsewhere within the United States to visit family and friends and often, together with friends and family, traveled to Europe, the Caribbean, China, and other far flung
places. They even invested in a small condominium in the Dominican Republic where they learned Spanish and how to dance Salsa. They continued to make friends along the way.
Their many travels were interrupted when Arthur developed a medical condition that led to episodic, but severe, illness. He eventually underwent surgery to address the condition. Unfortunately, complications from the surgery led to even greater health challenges. Over the past two years, Arthur valiantly faced every medical challenge that came his way (and there were many including total loss of vision). Throughout all of those challenges, his “Bride” of 55 years remained steadfastly by his side, caring for him with support from his daughters, his brother, Gerald, aunties, cousins, nieces, nephews, and many friends.
He died peacefully in the early morning hours of January 7, 2021, surrounded by his wife and his three daughters. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, his three daughters and sons-in-law, his four granddaughters, siblings, aunts, cousins, nieces, nephews and scores of other family and friends. He will be sorely missed by all who knew and loved him.

Deborah Wickes Schwabach ’59

Deborah A. Schwabach of Gilbertsville, New York, died Thursday, July 9, 2020, following a long illness.
She was born Deborah Ann Wickes on June 23, 1942, at Albany Medical Center and grew up in Scotia.
She graduated from the Northampton School for Girls in Northampton, Massachusetts, and attended the University of Chicago. She later graduated from the SUNY Regents College and University of Kentucky.
She loved nature, birds, wildlife and exploring back roads to see where they would take her. She had an extensive knowledge of New York State history and wrote articles for Adirondack Life, Kaatskill Life, New York Alive, the Encyclopedia of New York State, as well as many newspapers and national magazines. She also had some poetry published. She drove the Alaska Highway in an old pickup truck and crossed the country many times, visiting every U.S. state except Hawaii and Alabama.
She taught writing at SUNY Oneonta, Syracuse University, SUNY Cortland, the University of Delaware, and the Marist College program at Oneonta Job Corps.
A lifelong proponent of Civil Rights, she was honored as the NAACP’s Person of the Year for her campaign to get Oneonta library cards for Job Corps students.
She is survived by her sons, Aaron (spouse, Qienyuan Zhou) of San Diego and Jon of Gilbertsville and daughter, Karen of Hammondsport; sister, Cynthia (spouse, James Vail) of North Carolina; nieces, Gabrielle and Lindsay; and grandchildren, Veronica, Jessica and Daniel.
She was predeceased by her daughter, Jennifer; nephew, Jeffrey; and brother, Robert.
A graveside service will be held at 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 14, in Brookside Cemetery in Gilbertsville, with a memorial service planned for a later date after the pandemic.
The family asks that those who wish to do so please donate to the Gilbertsville Emergency Squad in her memory.

Evelyn Lyman Smith ’50

Evelyn Lyman Smith of West Hartford, CT died on October 20, 2020. She was born in Hartford, CT, on June 13, 1932, to Louis Richard and Florence (Bradley) Lyman. She has been reunited with her husband of 59 years, G. Franklin “Frank” Smith. She leaves behind four daughters, Wendy Lyman Smith of West Hartford, CT, Kimberly Smith Pratt and her husband Terry of Oxford, CT, Brenda Smith Sanden and her husband David of Redding, CA, and Cheryl Smith Espinal and her husband Eduardo from West Hartford, CT. She was predeceased by her brother Louis Richard Lyman, Jr., and her sister Marilyn Lyman Hendsey. She leaves behind 8 grandchildren, Hunter Sigler, Cathain Pratt, Spencer Pratt, Audrey Pratt, Eric Sanden, Adam Sanden, Jennifer Espinal and Stephen Espinal. A lifelong resident of West Hartford, she attended both Sedgwick and Hall High school. She graduated from both Northampton School for Girls and Elmira College. She worked at the Traveler’s Insurance Company and dedicated many years to working at West Hartford’s Senior Center. She was an active, lifetime member of First Church of Christ Congregational where she served on numerous committees including the Head of the Flower committee and took great pride in the annual Christmas wreath hangings which later became a family tradition. She coordinated multiple fundraisers including the weekly sale of Marion Heath Greeting Cards to raise funds for the new church kitchen renovation plus the elevator campaign. Evelyn was known for the countless hours she spent in her beautiful backyard gardens on Sunrise Hill. She was a longtime member of the West Hartford Garden Club, very knowledgeable about all kinds of flowers and shrubs. Her cooking, baking, and overall creativity was to be admired. She was also an accomplished piano player, introducing all four daughters to the piano at an early age plus teaching several children from the neighborhood. Evelyn was a devoted and loving daughter, sister, mother, aunt and grandmother, delighted in being part of any family activities, especially when her children and grandchildren were involved. She will be greatly missed. Due to COVID, Services-calling hours be held privately by family.

Theodore D. Kurrus ’53

Theodore Dudley Kurrus, 86, passed away on Sept. 12, 2020. Ted was born in Mt. Kisco, New York, to Doris Dudley and Theodore Hornby Kurrus.

Ted’s youth was peppered with attendance at a dozen boarding schools, including Williston-Northampton School, Massachusetts, where in 2013 he was inducted into the Williston Hall of Fame for swimming. Following high school he attended Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, where he graduated with a BA in Economics and a minor in English in 1957. Continuing his swimming talents in college, Ted was recognized by his alma mater in 1997 with induction into the Kenyon Hall of Fame for his swimming and diving achievements.

After college, Ted began a worldwide photo-journalism career, which led him to 68 countries and a nomination for a Pulitzer Prize in journalism. His writings appeared in a wide variety of international publications.

In 1959, he worked for Chicago’s United Press International and later move to the Indianapolis Bureau. From there, Ted set sail for Hawaii where he joined the Honolulu Advertiser in 1961 as general assignment reporter, and later transferred to the Honolulu Star-Bulletin. He worked on special assignment for United Press International while in Hawaii covering the summer Olympic team in Tokyo and winter Olympics in Innsbruck 1964. Afterward, he ran his own freelance agency in Hawaii in the famed Treehouse at International Market Place, Waikiki. His career path led him to employment in Hong Kong as Associate Editor of Asian Business and Industry Magazine.

Ted was the first member of the Western press corps to enter the Citadel Proper (near Hue) on Sept. 16, 1972, where he photographed the initial raising of the colors of the Republic of Vietnam over the Main Gate of the Citadel at Quang Tri, which was considered the Iwo Jima for the Vietnam War. The U.S. Marine Corps gave him a commendation acknowledging “personal courage, unlimited ability and noteworthy dedication to the fundamental concept of full and accurate press coverage of the event.”

After Vietnam, he joined the Dallas Morning News, where he developed a great interest of China (PRC). He began interpreting whatever events could be seen through that country’s “bamboo keyhole.” And in 1976, he had the opportunity to visit the PRC as one of only three American-based journalists invited to report on the semi-annual Kwangechow Export Commodities Fair. The six-part series attracted the attention of China watchers in the USA and overseas.

In the late ’70s, he managed worldwide communications for Rockwell International based in Dallas, Texas.

He returned to Hawaii in the early ’80s and continued his life of writing and sailing. In 1990, he and his wife, Rita Mae, semi-retired to Seaside, Oregon, where they opened Rita Mae’s Great Little Bed & Breakfast and Rita Mae’s Great Little Wine Haus & Deli Pub. In 1993, they fully retired to Green Valley, Arizona.

Ted’s passion for the sea led to a peregrination around the world. In Hawaii, he pursued his mariner passions with membership in Kaneohe Yacht Club. His boats, Harmattan II and Summer notched many cup victories. He shared his love of the sea with his family. While Ted was an aficionado of all sports, the Chicago Cubs were his favorite and their winning of the 2016 World Series was a dream come true.

Ted lived life large. Artist, cartoonist, poet, golfer, Life Master bridge player, were a few of the hats he wore. He filled his life with the talent he was given to the fullest.

Ted is survived by his wife of 38 years, Rita Mae; son David Kurrus; daughter Kimberly Kurrus (grandchildren Jamie and Aaron); son Alexander (wife Stephanie) Kurrus (grandchildren Matthew, Steven, Chase, Alexis, Austin); daughter Kristina (husband Chris) Pagnotta (grandchildren Zachary and Nicholas); stepson Christopher (wife Maria) Spelleri (grandchildren Robert and Anna).

Preceded in death by two brothers, Jack “Butch” Jenkins and Thomas Kurrus. Survived by his brother, Theo (wife Susan) Kurrus, New Smyrna Beach, Florida; and sister, Jo Ann Kurrus-Emory, Houston, Texas.

A private Mass will be held at Our Lady of the Valley in Green Valley. Donations in Ted’s memory may be made to St. Jude’s Hospital, Hawaii Special Olympics or Green Valley Fire District.

William D. Clark Jr. ’53

William “Bill” Clark Jr. of South Windsor, CT, formerly of Enfield and East Windsor, died on September 5, 2020 at Saint Francis Hospital. Bill was born in New Haven on December 18, 1934, to the late William Clark Sr. and Gertrude (Stocking) Clark. Most of his youth was spent in Windsor. He went to junior and senior high at Williston Academy (now known as the Williston Northampton School) and graduated in 1953. He graduated from Bates College in 1957 and then served in the Army Reserves. Bill was an English teacher at East Windsor High School for 23 years and then ran a computer lab there for 12 years. He retired from the school system in 1994. After a few months, he joined the IT department at the Dexter Company (now known as Ahlstrom) in Windsor Locks. He retired from Ahlstrom in 2005.
Bill was kind, gentle and generous. His brother-in-law, Dick Kowalsky, wrote a beautiful reflection of Bill’s life which says a great deal about him: “Bill could be a quiet sort of guy. I noticed that he used his ears more than his mouth. I’d say, a good example for us all. One of his passions was minerals, especially those which were rare or had a gem-like quality. Besides being a rockhound, Bill was a hound for life. He was interested in many things but spent a great amount of energy as a family man and high school teacher where he spent much of his professional life. Bill had a special gift for relating to young people and had a positive impact on many of them. Many times, as I walked in town with him, we would encounter someone who knew him, several were former students. I was always amazed at how well-known Bill was in the community. Bill’s love for minerals led him to learn how to make fine jewelry and he and Evelyn had a jewelry business for several years. His creative eye also was expressed in photography. His photos exhibited fine composition and were exhibited throughout his home. He had a zest for food and when he was not in his craft shop, he could be found in the kitchen making wonderful daily meals for his family and guests. His son, Billy, is carrying on the culinary talent. Bill could turn prose into poetry. When I read some of his work, I experienced many emotions, a sign of his gift to see the world in ways unseen by others yet touching senses I could identify with. Beyond his personal interests, Bill had an abiding passion for social justice. Along with Evelyn, he was quick to become involved with local and international issues. Once when they were visiting my family in North Carolina, we told them about a local protest regarding a job-related issue associated with the father of a friend. They immediately said, ‘Let’s go support that.’ Bill’s focus on the needs and concerns of others was a good example for everyone. Bill made the best of life as a son, husband, father, grandfather, and friend to many people. He loved everyone and left the world a better place because he lived in it. God speed Bill. It was great to know you.”
Bill was compiling his writing into a book when he became ill. His daughter, Marie will complete it for him. Bill is survived by his wife of almost 62 years, Evelyn (Vezina) Clark of South Windsor; daughter, Marie Clark of South Windsor; son, William Clark III of Hamburg, New Jersey; granddaughters, Leidi Clark and Flor Clark of South Windsor. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at Saint Patrick – Saint Anthony Church, 285 Church St., Hartford, on Saturday, September 19, at 10:30 a.m. Please observe Covid 19 precautions. The funeral mass will also be live-streamed. You may use the following link: https://venue.streamspot.com/event/MjMzJDAyMQ
Burial will be private. Ample free parking is available in the Saints’ Lot across the street from the church. Memorial donations may be made to Doctors Without Borders, P.O. Box 5030, Hagerstown, MD 21741, or online: donate.doctorswithoutborders.org.; or Franciscan Center for Urban Ministry, 285 Church St., Hartford, CT.

Diane Warner Wojtowicz ’52

Diane Linda (Warner) Wojtowicz passed away peacefully in her sleep on August 28, 2020. Born June 29, 1934 in New York, the daughter of the late James Warner and Mary (Zywar) Warner, as a child she grew up in the Bronx, NY and Easthampton, MA. She attended St. Michael’s High School and the Northampton School for Girls. She had a lifelong love of dancing and met her soulmate, Clarky Wojtowicz, at a Chicopee dance in 1954. They married in 1955 and together owned and operated multiple businesses in Chicopee over the next 30 years, including Clarky’s, Market Square and The Kendall. In 1984, they purchased Wyckoff Country Club in Holyoke, which they and their family owned and operated for 36 years. Those close to her will miss her love of children and animals, her unexpectedly bursting into song, and especially her laugh. She famously “never let the truth get in the way of a good story” and would happily regale anyone with many tales about her and her husband’s lives in the service industry or her childhood. The last years of her life were spent in well earned retirement in Marco Island cared for by her daughter Tami. She is predeceased by her parents, stepfather (Francis “Frannie” Wodicka), and her husband Clarence “Clarky” Wojtowicz. She is survived by her four children: Lynn Stebbins and her husband Kenneth of Belchertown, Clark Wojtowicz of Chicopee, Tami Kelley and husband Tony of Marco Island, FL; and Jay Wojtowicz and his wife Caroline of Easthampton. She also leaves 9 grandchildren (Amy, Mark, Kris, Grant, Brooke, Paige, Kyle, Hunter, Lucas), 4 great-grandchildren (Graham, Thaddeus, Grayson, and Kimber), many former employees who became family (Linda), and cousins with whom she kept in close touch. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society or St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. A celebration of life will take place at a future date.

Lawrence H. Herzig ’56


Lawrence H. Herzig (U.S. Army Ret.), 84, of Castle Pines, CO, died Friday, August 14, 2020, at Legacy Village of Castle Pines with family by his side.

Larry is survived by his wife of 44 years, Joan (Pellerin) Herzig; a daughter, Catherine (Herzig) Crowley and her husband Ralph of Leominster, MA; a son, Philip Herzig and his wife Holly of Mesa, AZ; a sister, Linda (Herzig) de Laveaga, of Star, ID; two stepsons, Rob Matson and his wife Elizabeth of Castle Rock, and Glenn Matson and his wife Stephanie of Las Vegas, NV; a stepdaughter, Elizabeth Van Vechten and her husband Brian of Castle Rock; 14 grandchildren and 7 great grandchildren; a niece and a nephew; and his dog, Lexi. He was predeceased by his father, Elgin Herzig, in 1973; his mother, Doris (Reynolds) Herzig, in 1974; and his brother, Russell Herzig, in 2013.

Larry was born to Elgin and Doris of Pittsfield, MA, in 1936. Before graduating from Pittsfield High School in 1954, Larry was a two-time all-Berkshire and all-Western Massachusetts guard in football, a standout sprinter and shot-putter in track and field, a top-ranked speedskater, and a letterman in hockey and baseball. He attended prep school at Williston Academy in Easthampton from 1954 to 1955, where he again starred on the gridiron, on the track, and in the pit. He attended Stetson University in Deland, FL, from 1955 to 1956, where he played fullback until a knee injury ended his playing days. He would later earn his associate’s degree from Mt. Wachusett Community College in Gardner, MA.

Larry enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1958, attending basic training at Fort Dix, NJ. After several years in the enlisted ranks, he entered the warrant officer ranks after earning his aviator wings as a helicopter pilot. He would serve two tours in Vietnam, flying Hueys his first tour and Cobras his second. His awards included the Bronze Star, the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal with “V” device, the Air Medal with 32nd award, and the Army Commendation Medal with second Oak Leaf Cluster. He would also receive a Purple Heart. His tours of duty included France, Texas, Massachusetts, then-West Germany, Hawai’i, and eventually Colorado, where he would retire from the service in 1984 with more than 26 years of steadfast service.

Thereafter, he worked mostly as an independent contractor until 2015. Larry was an avid reader who enjoyed golfing, bowling, crossword puzzles, painting, music, travelling, playing with his family members, testing his vast knowledge during Jeopardy, and rooting for the New England Patriots. He was intelligent, articulate, witty, selfless, and the epitome of a patriot. Above all, he was a devoted family man, a loyal son and brother, and a trustworthy friend who will be missed immensely.

Upcoming Events Graveside Aug 27. 2:30 PM (MST) Ft. Logan National Cemetery 4400 West Kenyon Avenue Denver, CO, 80236

Cherry Copeland Gillespie ’56

Cherry Copeland Gillespie, age 82, of Greenville, Delaware passed away peacefully on the morning of May 31, 2020. Born May 19, 1938, Cherry grew up in Holland, Michigan. Sailing was a favorite pastime in her youth and something she enjoyed as an adult whenever the opportunity arose. Cherry attended Bradford Junior College in Haverhill, MA, where she made several lifelong friends. From there she studied at Katherine Gibbs Secretarial School and worked in New York City until she and her roommates were enticed to attend a dance in Connecticut hosted by some boys from Yale that were short a few dates. That night she met the love of her life William (Bill) F. Gillespie III, whom she married in 1960.
Bill’s career with DuPont brought them to Wilmington, DE at first, then on to Evanston, IL, Kansas City, MO and Lake Forest, IL before settling permanently back in Delaware in 1969.
In each city, Cherry took great pride in making her homes places of comfortable, tasteful elegance. Her knack for interior design led many friends to ask her for guidance, and she eventually got her decorator’s license working part-time in affiliation with Plain & Fancy in Centerville, DE. Her love of design extended into her gardens as well. Cultivating plants and flowers was a year-round interest. She was a long-time member of the Wilmington Garden Club and held several leadership roles over the years. Besides these activities, raising two children, and enjoying many wonderful times with the dozens of people in her circle of friends, Cherry enjoyed playing golf. She and Bill were longtime members of Bidermann and the Vicmead Hunt Club. Much of their travel in later years revolved around opportunities to play golf. This passion led Cherry and Bill to South Carolina in the early 1980’s where they became founding members of Spring Island in Okatie, SC. Many other wonderful friendships were formed there. Their legacy lives on at Spring Island through the Gillespie Nature trail. After Bill’s untimely death in 2004, Cherry continued going to Spring Island seasonally before eventually selling their home to be in Greenville DE full-time. In recent years, her life centered around playing bridge, participating in Garden Club, visiting friends and her children and grandchildren.
Cherry was preceded in death by her sister Sally Copeland Horrax, and her husband William F. Gillespie III. She is survived by her son Brook J. Gillespie (Kathy) and granddaughter MacKenzie Gillespie of Chester Springs, PA, and her daughter Sally H. Gillespie, granddaughter Emily C. Boettger and grandson William “Gunner” Boettger of Sun Valley, Idaho.
The family is planning a memorial service to be held in Delaware in the fall. Those wishing to honor her memory are encouraged to donate to The Garden Club of Wilmington – PO Box 3855 Wilmington, DE 19807 or The Spring Island Trust – 40 Mobley Oaks Lane, Okatie, SC 29909.

Robert A. Alden ’50

Robert A. Alden, a Washington Post news and layout editor for 48 years who helped design the inside pages of the newspaper’s first section, died June 7, 2020 at his home in McLean, Va. He was 87.

The cause was complication from Alzheimer’s disease, his wife, Diane Alden, said.

Mr. Alden retired from The Post in 2000. His career included the design and layout of newspaper pages containing stories, photographs and headlines about happenings that ranged from routine procedures of local governing boards to airplane crashes, natural disasters and historic events including the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963 and the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon in 1974.

On busy nights, the page designs and layouts had to be changed several times to keep up with fast-breaking events.

Mr. Alden was also president of the National Press Club in 1976, and he was a co-founder of the National Press Foundation, which supports educational programs for journalists. He was among the early advocates of the admission of women to press-club membership, which came about in the 1970s.

Mr. Alden had lived in McLean since 1953 and saw it evolve from a rural community of dairy cows and farms into a bustling suburb of shops and expensive houses. He was a longtime civic activist who helped plan McLean’s downtown, including a park and community center. The 386-seat community theater is named in his honor.

Robert Ames Alden was born in Washington on Feb. 5, 1933, and he spent part of his childhood in Rocky River, Ohio. As a high school student, he worked part-time at the Cleveland Press from 1947 to 1951 as a writer and reporter.

Returning to Washington after high school, he was a statistician at the Office of Price Stabilization before joining The Post news staff in 1952.

While working at the paper, he attended George Washington University, where he received a bachelor’s degree in 1965 and a master’s degree in history in 1968.

In 1958, he married Diane Heidkamp. In addition to his wife, of McLean, survivors include four children, William Alden of Princeton, N.J., Thomas Alden of Manchester, Vt., Jennifer Alden of Chesterfield, Va., and Martha Alden of Reston, Va.; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.